Calendar

Apr
14
Sun
The Parade (Parada) @ North End Studios
Apr 14 @ 5:00 pm
Director: Srdjan Dragojević
Serbia | 2011 | Narrative | Serbo-Croatian w/English subtitles
Narrative | 115 minutes
Film source: Global Lens
FREE SHOWING

A group of gay activists in Belgrade strikes a tense alliance with Limun, a Serbian crime boss, whose fiancée demands an extravagant wedding that only struggling gay theater director Mirko and his friends can provide. In exchange, macho Limun reluctantly agrees to provide security for the group’s Pride parade. It’s a tall order: previous attempts to march met with mass violence from right-wing skinheads. When Limun’s gang balks at the assignment, he recruits a band of former Balkan war combatants, now dear friends, who will stand up to the aggressors Seven Samurai style, in this rollickingly shrewd and humane comedic take on a vital human rights issue.

About the Director: Srdjan Dragojević was born in Belgrade, Yugoslavia (now Serbia) in 1963. He studied clinical psychology at the University of Belgrade and film at the University of Arts in Belgrade. His debut feature, We Are Not Angels, won nine awards (out of fourteen nominations) at the 1992 Crystal Prism Awards, Yugoslavia’s Academy Awards. His fifth feature, Saint George Shoots the Dragon, won Best Artistic Contribution at the Montreal World Film Festival in 2009. The Parade is his sixth feature film.

A full “Study Guide” about the film, prepared by the Global Film Initiative, can be downloaded here PDF)

May
12
Sun
Highway @ North End Studios
May 12 @ 5:00 pm


Director: Deepak Rauniyar
Nepal | 2012 | Narrative | Nepali w/English subtitles
Narrative | 80 minutes
Highway

FREE SHOWING

The feature debut of Nepali filmmaker Deepak Rauniyar, marks the rise of a fresh new cinematic vision for the Himalayan nation. Decidedly different from the standard commercial product heavily influenced by Bollywood, the film takes an understated look at an increasingly common phenomenon: the bandhs, roadblocks caused by strikes or protests that often paralyze traffic and disrupt daily life.

The unusual road drama centers around an ill-fated journey on a highway from eastern Nepal to Kathmandu, the nation’s capital. A bus filled with passengers of various social and economic backgrounds gets repeatedly stuck in bandhs. Each passenger is desperate to get to Kathmandu for a different reason — a man needs to reach his wife quickly to try to conceive a baby or else the herbal fertility medicine he has taken will lose effectiveness, a young woman leaves her lover and is on her way to an arranged marriage, and a man hurries back home to see his boyfriend who is devastated by an attack on a transgender friend. They quickly put their heads together and transform the bus into a wedding vehicle — with a bride, a groom, and a wedding band in tow — to gain passage.

Crisscrossing this seemingly humorous adventure are fragments of each individual’s backstory, ironically filled with despair, hardship, and deceit. The non-linear narrative structure, which includes the main plot and disconnected subplots, offers a kaleidoscopic look at contemporary Nepali life, which has only recently emerged from 12 years of civil war.

Read the interview with Director Deepak Rauniyar

 

Jun
9
Sun
About 111 Girls (Darabre 111 Dokhtar) @ North End Studios
Jun 9 @ 5:00 pm

Director: Nahid Ghobadi and Bijan Zamanpira
Iraq | 2012 | Narrative | Farsi & Kurdish w/English subtitles
Narrative | 79 minutes
Film source: Global Lens

Global Film Series

FREE SHOWING

A government official, carrying a message from Iran’s president, travels across Iranian Kurdistan with his driver and a young guide on a mission to stop 111 young Kurdish women from committing suicide in protest against conditions that have left them spinsters. Racing against the clock, they travel into territory simmering with resentment at official neglect and the hardship it has sown among a proud people. Against a dramatically colorful physical and human landscape, wistful longing mingles with dreamlike desire and absurdist humor as the three travelers meander helplessly in a land riddled with contradictions.

About the Directors: Nahid Ghobadi was born in Baneh, Iran in 1964. She studied librarianship at Tehran University and film at Columbia College Hollywood, is a published poet and has directed nine short films and documentaries. About 111 Girls is her first feature film.

Bijan Zamanpira was born in Sanandaj, Iran in 1965. He studied Persian language and literature at Payame Noor University in Tehran and has directed eleven short films and documentaries. About 111 Girls is his first feature film.

A full “Study Guide” about the film, prepared by the Global Film Initiative, can be downloaded here PDF)

Jul
14
Sun
Beijing Flickers (You-Zhong) @ North End Studios
Jul 14 @ 5:00 pm

Director: Zhang Yuan
China | 2012 | Narrative | Mandarin w/English subtitles
Narrative | 96 minutes
Film source: Global Lens

Beijing Flickers

FREE SHOWING
San Bao is a young man left behind by Beijing’s fabulous new wealth, having just lost his job, his apartment and the woman he loves (who’s left him for a richer man). Even Happiness, his dog, has run away from him. Lovelorn, self-destructive and desperately aimless, San Bao nevertheless has moments of euphoria amid his own despair, as he roams the sleek, shifting city with other soulful, cash-poor dreamers and misfits. Such heavenly losers form the vital spirit of Beijing in acclaimed director Zhang Yuan’s gorgeously gritty, angst-ridden portrait of youthful disaffection and perseverance in the teeth of heartbreak, ruthless inequality and unfeeling ambition.

About the Director

Zhang Yuan was born in Nanjing, China in 1963. He studied cinematography at the Beijing Film Academy and began directing feature films in 1980. In 1994, TIME Magazine selected him as one of the 100 Young Leaders of the Next Century. A leading filmmaker of China’s Sixth Generation, his second feature, Beijing Bastards, received a Special Mention by the Official Jury at the Locarno Film Festival in 1993, and his fourth feature, Sons, won the Tiger Award at the International Film Festival Rotterdam in 1996. Beijing Flickers is his eleventh feature film.

A full Study Guide about the film, prepared by the Global Film Initiative, can be downloaded here (PDF)
Aug
11
Sun
The Fantastic World of Juan Orol @ North End Studios
Aug 11 @ 5:00 pm

Director: Sebastián del Amo
Mexico | 2012 | Narrative | Spanish w/English subtitles
Narrative | 90 minutes
Film source: Global Lens

The Fantastic World of Juan Orol

FREE SHOWING

Move over Ed Wood! Mexico’s half-forgotten B-movie master, “involuntary surrealist” Juan Orol, receives a pitch-perfect tribute in this irresistible love letter to a self-made man of showbiz, whose career spanned nearly sixty films. In a glorious black-and-white flashback mingling movie-tainted memories of his Galician childhood, forced exile to Cuba and arrival in Mexico, intrepid “Juanito“ pursues failed careers as baseball player, boxer, bullfighter and gangster before landing in the movies—where failure kind of works for him. As Orol, Roberto Sosa exudes droll underdog charm, anchoring a fast-moving comedy where every frame is an infectious homage to a golden age of cinema, the wile of memory and the art of fantasy.

About the Director

About the Director Sebastián del Amo was born in Paris, France in 1971 and attended school in Mexico beginning at a young age. He studied filmmaking at the Centro de Capacitación Cinematográfica (CCC) in Mexico City. He has worked as a director, writer and director of photography for numerous short films.The Fantastic World of Juan Orol is his first feature film.

A full Study Guide about the film, prepared by the Global Film Initiative, can be downloaded here (PDF)

 

Sep
8
Sun
Grey Matter (Matiere Grise) @ North End Studios
Sep 8 @ 5:00 pm

Director: Kivu Ruhorahoza
Rwanda | 2011 | Narrative | Kinyarwanda and French w/English subtitles
Narrative | 100 minutes
Film source: Global Lens

Grey Matter

FREE SHOWING
Set in Kigali, Rwanda’s capital, this radiantly self-referential film-within-a-film describes the vision and trials of a determined filmmaker named Balthazar, as he tries to produce his first feature, The Cycle of the Cockroach. The trenchant drama, about a brother and sister dealing with the aftermath of genocide, finds no support from agencies only interested in funding upbeat policy-friendly films. As Balthazar borrows recklessly from a loan shark, the Cycle plays out on the screen, subtly measuring the horror and systematic madness of events hardly unique to Rwanda, while offering bracing insight into the nature of political violence.

About the Director: Kivu Ruhorahoza was born in Kigali, Rwanda in 1982. A self-taught filmmaker, he won the award for Best African Short at Montreal’s 25th Pan African International Film Festival and Best Short at the Kenya International Film Festival in 2009 for his short film, Lost in the South. He has also produced an experimental documentary, Rwanda 15, with New York saxophonist Jeremy Danneman for the Parade of One project. Grey Matter is his first feature film and the first feature-length narrative film produced in Rwanda by a native Rwandan filmmaker.

A full Study Guide about the film, prepared by the Global Film Initiative, can be downloaded here

 

Oct
11
Fri
Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase 1 @ Film House
Oct 11 @ 2:30 pm

THE WORST THING ABOUT COMING OUT
Director: Rob Barracano & Champlain Filmmaking Students Documentary
Run Time: 60 minutes
Sponsor: The Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase is sponsored by Ben & Jerry’s and the Vermont Arts Council
FREE SCREENING Screening free, recommended donation of $5+.
World Premiere.
Followed by panel discussion at 3:45
What is the worst thing that happens when coming out as gay, lesbian, bisexual, trans-gender or queer? The answers, and much more are revealed in this touching and inspiring film. A feature length documentary derived from the interviews on the website, Worstthingaboutcomingout.com an on-line repository for queer community coming out stories, aimed at serving queer folks that are still in the closet. Read more…

Panel: Self-Identity + Home: Ourselves in Our Community @ Film House
Oct 11 @ 3:45 pm
Talks & Panels
Sponsor: Champlain College

FREE TO ATTEND
Panel accompanies the screening of The Worst Thing About Coming Out and celebrates National Coming Out Day.
Panelists include: Rob Barracano, Dr. Eric Ronis, teacher, Dr Ame Lambert – of Champlain College, Dr. Kim Fountain of RU12, Representative Joanna Cole, John Chagnon, Health & Wellness Coordinator, RU12 and Tate Bates who appears in the film.

“To thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.” ~ William Shakespeare

Oct
12
Sat
Short Term 12 @ Film House
Oct 12 @ 8:15 pm

Director: Destin Daniel Cretton
USA | 2012 | Fiction | French w/English subtitles
Run Time: 96 minutes
Film source: Cinedigm
Sponsor: Lorna-Kay Peal & Michael Smolin

Short Term 12

GET TICKETS
Winner of both the Grand Jury Narrative Feature and the Narrative Audience Award at this year’s SXSW Film Festival, Short Term 12 is moving, honest, and emotionally revelatory. Focusing on the residents and caretakers at a residential foster care center for at-risk teenagers, Short Term 12 explores the difficult and extremely human realities of what it means to take care of another person. The story is told largely through the eyes of Grace (rising star Brie Larson, who won Best Actress at the Locarno Film Festival for her performance), the facility’s supervisor, as she tries to find ways to deal with her own life as well as those of the residents. Grace is put to the test with the arrival of Jayden, a troubled new arrival with whom she finds a special connection. Shot in an unobtrusive, handheld style, Short Term 12 is raw, sincere, and, at times, unexpectedly funny, with terrific performances at every level.

Awards

Grand Jury Award SXSW, Best Actress Locarno Film Festival

Oct
13
Sun
Voices Unveiled: Turkish Women Who Dare @ North End Studios
Oct 13 @ 5:00 pm

Director: Binnur Karaevli
Turkey/USA | 2010 | Narrative | English & Turkish w/English subtitles
Narrative | 69 minutes
Film source: Women Make Movies

Sponsors: The Vermont Council on World Affairs; The World Affairs Councils of America; The Turkish Cultural Foundation

VoicesUnveiledhires

FREE SHOWING

Can Islamic values co-exist with full equality for women? VOICES UNVEILED examines this timely issue through portraits of three women pursuing life paths and careers of their own choosing in present-day Turkey. Each has defied social expectations in a democratic, secular nation where religious fundamentalism has re-emerged as a political force and patriarchal values still prevail. Well-known textile artist Belkis Belpinar, whose work combines science and kilim rug traditions, resisted her father’s wishes that she study engineering. Dancer and psychologist Banu Yucelar braved family opposition to modern dance, widely perceived as a form of prostitution. Women’s rights activist Nur Bakata Mardin helps women in underserved communities, where old beliefs hold sway, form small business cooperatives.

 As engaging as its subjects, Voice Unveiled punctuates its in-depth portraits with insights from other Turks and lively discussions that include intergenerational debates over veiling.

 

Oct
16
Wed
Tanta Agua (So Much Water) @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 16 @ 6:00 pm

Director: Ana Guevara, Leticia Jorge
Uruguay | 2012 | Fiction | Spanish w/English subtitles
Run Time: 96 minutes
Film source: Film Movement

Tanta Agua

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Winner of multiple awards at several international film festivals, Uruguay’s Tanta Agua is the directorial debut of Ana Guevara Pose and Leticia Jorge Romero. Simple in premise but emotionally complex, Tanta Agua (roughly translated, “So Much Water”) takes us along on a “fun” resort vacation as a divorced father (Guzzini) tries to reconnect with his kids, 13-year-old Lucía (Chouza, in a terrific performance) and 10-year-old Federico (Castiglioni). But the constant, torrential rain and the awkwardness between the family members make any sort of reconnection nearly impossible. Rather than play this situation for pathos, Pose and Romero extract from it gentle comedy and true insight into adolescence, especially in the film’s latter half, which focuses on Lucía’s misguided attempts at a summertime fling. Tanta Agua is the exact opposite of heavy-handed, leaving it up to the viewer to process and reflect on its emotional genuineness, and on the kind of uncomfortable family situation with which we can all identify.

Awards

Knight Grand Jury Prize – MIFF; Best First Feature – Guadalajara Film Festival

Oct
17
Thu
The Attack @ Film House
Oct 17 @ 7:30 pm
Director: Ziad Doueiri (read interview)
Lebanon | 2013 | Fiction | Hebrew, Arabic w/English subtitles
Film Source: Cohen Media Group
Sponsor: Barbara McGrew
Also: Film with discussion

The Attack

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This challenging film – a Lebanese-French-Qatari-Belgian coproduction – focuses on the seemingly small, interpersonal questions and connections which, in reality, underpin even the most dramatic political struggles. Set in present-day Israel, The Attack’s title refers not only to the Israel-Palestinian conflict but to a more metaphorical assault on the closest personal relationship of a doctor who, in the aftermath of a terrorist bombing, finds himself at the epicenter of the battle. The Attack, which has won festival awards and attracted great critical praise, asks two simple yet potentially harrowing questions of every one of its viewers: How well do you really know the people you love? And, furthermore, what are the consequences of truly knowing everything about them? The film walks the tightrope that just barely separates not only Arab and Jewish cultures, but love and hate, as well. It is the personalized approach that gives this film its universal focus.

Interview with Director Ziad Doueiri (PDF)

Laurence Anyways @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 17 @ 7:45 pm

Director: Xavier Nolan
Canada | 2013 | Fiction | French w/English subtitles
Run Time: 161 minutes
Film source: Breaking Glass Pictures

Laurence Anyways

GET TICKETS
Winner of several major festival awards, Laurence Anyways is the third film from Quebeçois enfant terrible Xavier Dolan, whose films I Killed My Mother (2009) and Heartbeats (2010) were both international sensations. Evoking Rainer Werner Fassbinder (via Douglas Sirk), Wong Kar Wai, and Pedro Almodóvar, Dolan, not yet 25, has created a rich brew of daring cinematic accomplishment. A love story rendered impossible by the fluid nature of sexuality and identity, Laurence Anyways takes us through the many-gendered permutations of the romance of Laurence and Frédérique (Suzanne Clément, winner of the Un Certain Regard award for her performance at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival). Laurence, living as a man, reveals to his lover Frédérique that his life has been a lie, and that to be true to himself, he must live as a woman. Unsurprisingly, this revelation changes the nature of the couple’s romance, but not in ways that either of them would ever have expected. Bold, ambitious, and frank, Laurence Anyways is a challenging statement about gender, love, and human nature.

Awards

Best Canadian Feature film; Suzanne Clément – best Actress

Oct
19
Sat
Laurence Anyways @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 19 @ 12:00 pm

Director: Xavier Nolan
Canada | 2013 | Fiction | French w/English subtitles
Run Time: 161 minutes
Film source: Breaking Glass Pictures

Laurence Anyways

GET TICKETS
Winner of several major festival awards, Laurence Anyways is the third film from Quebeçois enfant terrible Xavier Dolan, whose films I Killed My Mother (2009) and Heartbeats (2010) were both international sensations. Evoking Rainer Werner Fassbinder (via Douglas Sirk), Wong Kar Wai, and Pedro Almodóvar, Dolan, not yet 25, has created a rich brew of daring cinematic accomplishment. A love story rendered impossible by the fluid nature of sexuality and identity, Laurence Anyways takes us through the many-gendered permutations of the romance of Laurence and Frédérique (Suzanne Clément, winner of the Un Certain Regard award for her performance at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival). Laurence, living as a man, reveals to his lover Frédérique that his life has been a lie, and that to be true to himself, he must live as a woman. Unsurprisingly, this revelation changes the nature of the couple’s romance, but not in ways that either of them would ever have expected. Bold, ambitious, and frank, Laurence Anyways is a challenging statement about gender, love, and human nature.

Awards

Best Canadian Feature film; Suzanne Clément – best Actress

Short Term 12 @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 19 @ 5:15 pm

Director: Destin Daniel Cretton
USA | 2012 | Fiction
Run Time: 96 minutes
Film source: Cinedigm
Sponsor: Lorna-Kay Peal & Michael Smolin

Short Term 12

GET TICKETS
Winner of both the Grand Jury Narrative Feature and the Narrative Audience Award at this year’s SXSW Film Festival, Short Term 12 is moving, honest, and emotionally revelatory. Focusing on the residents and caretakers at a residential foster care center for at-risk teenagers, Short Term 12 explores the difficult and extremely human realities of what it means to take care of another person. The story is told largely through the eyes of Grace (rising star Brie Larson, who won Best Actress at the Locarno Film Festival for her performance), the facility’s supervisor, as she tries to find ways to deal with her own life as well as those of the residents. Grace is put to the test with the arrival of Jayden, a troubled new arrival with whom she finds a special connection. Shot in an unobtrusive, handheld style, Short Term 12 is raw, sincere, and, at times, unexpectedly funny, with terrific performances at every level.

Awards

Grand Jury Award SXSW, Best Actress Locarno Film Festival

Oct
20
Sun
The Genius of Marian @ ECHO
Oct 20 @ 1:00 pm
Director: Banker White, Anna Fitch
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 84 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker
Sponsor: Nora and Nancy Bercaw in honor of Beau Bercaw 

Playing with: There’s No Hole in My Head
Director:
 Alison Segar | USA | 2011 | Documentary | 15 minutes

Genius of Marian

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A visually rich, emotionally complex story that follows Pam White in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease as her son, the filmmaker, documents her struggles to retain her sense of self. After she is diagnosed at age 61 life begins to change for Pam and everyone around her. Pam’s husband grapples with his changing role from partner to caregiver. Her adult children each find ways to show their love and support while mourning the slow loss of their mother. And Pam deals with the fear that she will be institutionalized for her disease. This delicate film treats the subject with a humor and a light touch while serving as a meditation on the role of memory in creating legacy.

 

Director’s Statment

I have been making documentary films for more than a decade and each project has been deeply important to me in its own way.  My most recent film, THE GENIUS OF MARIAN, is the most personal and most challenging project I have ever undertaken. I approached this film both as a loving son and as a patient observer.  It is a story about my extraordinary mother, Pam White, and her struggle with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. On the surface, the film is about my family’s efforts to come to terms with the changes Alzheimer’s disease brings. But it is also a meditation on the meaning of family, the power of art and the beautiful and painful ways we cope with illness and loss. The last few years have been a roller coaster of emotions, filled with frustration, sadness, joy and celebration. I didn’t originally set out to make a documentary film about my mother’s disease. The project began as a series of informal recorded conversations with my mom in the months after her Alzheimer’s diagnosis in 2009. She had begun writing a memoir called “The Genius of Marian” about her own mother (my grandmother), Marian Williams Steele. Marian was a well-loved and well-known painter and was in many ways the matriarch of our family. In 2001, Marian died of Alzheimer’s disease at the age of 89.

Soon after my mom started writing the book, she began to struggle with typing and other mental tasks. To help her continue the project, I began filming our conversations. For the next three years, I recorded both the big events and the small details of my family’s changing reality. I filmed my parents recounting stories of how they met and fell in love. I captured my mother’s delight at the birth of her grandchildren. But I also documented the slow erosion of my mother’s ability to dress and feed herself, her waning independence, and her fierce resistance to accepting help from professional caregivers.

I grew up feeling like my mom could do it all—and often, she did. She worked full-time while raising my siblings and me, maintained deep friendships and dedicated herself to helping others, both in her personal life and in her career as a therapist. She loved being a mom and encouraged us to be ourselves, always stressing how important it was to talk about our feelings, especially when times were tough. That’s why it was especially painful to see her frozen by the shame of her diagnosis, unable to talk openly about what she was experiencing. And despite being a loving, willing and available family, we also struggled to share our thoughts and feelings with each other. Before she was ready to talk candidly about her diagnosis, my mom and I were able to connect by remembering Marian, someone we’d both loved and had lost to the disease that was now affecting my mother. These intimate conversations became a kind of therapy space and my mom began to share the complex emotions related to what she was going through. At the same time, filming with the other members of my family provided a way for each of us to celebrate my mother’s life while processing difficult feelings about how she was changing. I am grateful to my siblings and father for having the bravery to share so openly. I have been especially moved by my father, who displayed tremendous compassion and loyalty while grappling with his changing role from partner to caregiver. The spirit of my mother’s book project was my point of departure — the deep desire to memorialize someone you love and to connect with the difficult and complex emotions that surround losing them. My goal is to create a film that finds light and beauty in a place often shrouded in shame and confusion. A patient approach to production has helped me capture the essence of my family’s story. I’ve shared warmth and intimacy in conversations with my mother, laid bare our family’s challenges in caring for her and allowed myself to feel the silence that increasingly fills my parents’ house. I believe the story is deeply important and powerfully told and I trust it will resonate not only for those directly affected by Alzheimer’s disease, but for with anyone who has had to reconcile complicated emotions around aging and loss. It is from this place that I know we have created something special.

~ Banker White, Director