Calendar

Oct
11
Fri
Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase 1 @ Film House
Oct 11 @ 2:30 pm

THE WORST THING ABOUT COMING OUT
Director: Rob Barracano & Champlain Filmmaking Students Documentary
Run Time: 60 minutes
Sponsor: The Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase is sponsored by Ben & Jerry’s and the Vermont Arts Council
FREE SCREENING Screening free, recommended donation of $5+.
World Premiere.
Followed by panel discussion at 3:45
What is the worst thing that happens when coming out as gay, lesbian, bisexual, trans-gender or queer? The answers, and much more are revealed in this touching and inspiring film. A feature length documentary derived from the interviews on the website, Worstthingaboutcomingout.com an on-line repository for queer community coming out stories, aimed at serving queer folks that are still in the closet. Read more…

Panel: Self-Identity + Home: Ourselves in Our Community @ Film House
Oct 11 @ 3:45 pm
Talks & Panels
Sponsor: Champlain College

FREE TO ATTEND
Panel accompanies the screening of The Worst Thing About Coming Out and celebrates National Coming Out Day.
Panelists include: Rob Barracano, Dr. Eric Ronis, teacher, Dr Ame Lambert – of Champlain College, Dr. Kim Fountain of RU12, Representative Joanna Cole, John Chagnon, Health & Wellness Coordinator, RU12 and Tate Bates who appears in the film.

“To thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.” ~ William Shakespeare

The Crash Reel @ Film House
Oct 11 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Lucy Walker
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 108 minutes
Film source: Phase4Films
Sponsor: Anonymous donor
Special Event: Opening Night Film. Special ticket prices for this film – 6-pack and 10-pack discounts don’t apply. All proceeds go to Special Olympics Vermont. Kevin & David Pearce in attendance. Preceded by opening night reception at 5pm in the Lakeside Lobby outside The Film House, Food provided courtesy of Sugarsnap, cash bar. Screening followed by Opening Night party at 8:30 pm, at Signal Kitchen. Announcement and presentation of Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase Awards. Party sponsored by Signal Kitchen.
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Crash Reel

It’s the training season for the 2010 winter Olympics. World-class snowboarder Kevin Pearce swings up the half pipe and launches into the air. He spins into a double cork 1080. It’s one of the toughest moves in his – or any – repertoire, and he comes back down, hard and fast, towards the ramp. The tail end of his board catches the ice. He falls forward with no time to put out his arms. His full weight lands on his head and neck. Academy Award-winning documentarian Lucy Walker’s film seamlessly combines twenty years of stunning action footage with vérité footage and interviews as it follows Kevin and exposes the irresistible but potentially fatal appeal of extreme sports. An escalating rivalry between Kevin and his nemesis Shaun White in the run-up to the 2010 Olympics leaves Shaun on top of the Olympic podium and Kevin in a coma following his accident. Kevin’s tight-knit Vermont family flies to his side and helps him rebuild his life as a brain injury survivor. But when he insists he wants to return to the sport he still loves, his family intervenes with his eloquent brother David speaking for all of them when he says, “I just don’t want you to die.” Kevin’s doctors caution him that even a small blow to the head could be enough to kill him. Will Kevin defy them and insist on pursuing his passion? With his now impaired skills, what other options does he have? How much risk is too much?

Awards

Audience Awards: SXSW, HotDocs

Oct
12
Sat
Short Term 12 @ Film House
Oct 12 @ 8:15 pm

Director: Destin Daniel Cretton
USA | 2012 | Fiction | French w/English subtitles
Run Time: 96 minutes
Film source: Cinedigm
Sponsor: Lorna-Kay Peal & Michael Smolin

Short Term 12

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Winner of both the Grand Jury Narrative Feature and the Narrative Audience Award at this year’s SXSW Film Festival, Short Term 12 is moving, honest, and emotionally revelatory. Focusing on the residents and caretakers at a residential foster care center for at-risk teenagers, Short Term 12 explores the difficult and extremely human realities of what it means to take care of another person. The story is told largely through the eyes of Grace (rising star Brie Larson, who won Best Actress at the Locarno Film Festival for her performance), the facility’s supervisor, as she tries to find ways to deal with her own life as well as those of the residents. Grace is put to the test with the arrival of Jayden, a troubled new arrival with whom she finds a special connection. Shot in an unobtrusive, handheld style, Short Term 12 is raw, sincere, and, at times, unexpectedly funny, with terrific performances at every level.

Awards

Grand Jury Award SXSW, Best Actress Locarno Film Festival

Oct
13
Sun
The Ridge (Pura Vida) @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 1:15 pm
Director: Pablo Irburu, Migueltxo Molina
Nepal, Spain | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 85 minutes
Film source: Dogwoof
Sponsor: Bobbie Lanahan
Special Note: US Premiere

The Ridge (Pura Vida)

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This exciting and gorgeously photographed film will keep you at the edge of your seat. It tells the nail-biting and life-affirming story of a dangerous rescue mission in the Himalayan Mountains. The south wall of Mount Annapurna in the Nepalese Himalayas is known among climbers as the most dangerous climb in the world. To reach the mountain’s summit at over 8,000 meters above sea level, mountaineers have to traverse a seven-kilometer-long ridge at 7,500 meters – an impossible task, especially for “pure” climbers who brave the thin air without oxygen tanks. So when experienced Spanish climber Iñaki Ochoa de Olza falls seriously ill while crossing the ridge in 2008, his hopes are slim. After his climbing partner Horia Colibasanu sounds the alarm, 12 fellow climbers from all over the world (Switzerland, Kazakhstan, Russia and the United States) mount a highly dangerous rescue operation. We travel the world to let these 12 rescuers tell their stories in their home environments. Why would they risk their lives to reach these mountaintops? Whatever the result of the rescue will be, these 12 heroes show us that the human spirit is alive and well.

A Passion for Snow @ Film House
Oct 13 @ 4:00 pm
Directors: Producer: Lisa Denmore;  Assoc Producer:  Rick Moulton; Exec. Producer: Steve Waterhouse
USA | 2013 | Documentary | English
Run Time: 60 minutes
Film source: biggreen65.com
Sponsor: Seventh Generation
Ticketing Note: This film is part of a triple bill with White Rock and the presentation: Restoring Olympic Films and includes a reception sponsored by SunCommon.

A Passion for Snow

GET TICKETS Note: Special triple bill ticketing including White Rock & Restoring Olympic Films.
100-plus years of skiing history from Dartmouth, based on the book “Passion for Skiing” by Dartmouth graduate Stephen Waterhouse. Breathtaking newly-discovered footage and compelling 1st-hand accounts from alumni who helped transform the sport of skiing into the $25 billion industry it is today- are masterfully edited by VT filmmaker Rick Moulton. The film opens with footage of “The Grinch,” created by Dartmouth grad Theodor Geisel – aka Dr. Seuss – sledding downhill towards Whoville. Narrated by Buck Henry and followed by stories on how ski racing, the 10th Mtn Div, ski resorts, the Olympics/Paralympics and much more got started,

SPECIAL EVENT

Q&A led by the filmmakers and Olympic Coach John Morton ,with former Olympians in the audience, including Tiger Shaw (President-to-be of the US Ski Association), members of the Cochran Family, and a number of Dartmouth’s all time racing stars. Followed by reception at 5:30 pm in the Main Street Landing Boardroom to launch the Sport & Film series, food and cash bar. Sponsored by SunCommon.

Reception for A Passion for Snow @ Film House Boardroom
Oct 13 @ 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm

A special reception to celebrate A Passion for Snow and our Sport & Film series
Food provided, cash bar.
Sponsors:  SunCommon. with support from Dartmouth Regional Affairs
catering-4

All ticket holders for A Passion for Snow  and White Rock are invited.

White Rock @ Film House
Oct 13 @ 6:45 pm
Director: Tony Maylem
UK | 1977 | Documentary
Run Time: 80 minutes
Film source: IOC
Sponsor: Smugglers Notch Resort
Special Note: North American Premiere. Introduced by Adrian Wood.
Ticketing Note:TICKETS CANNOT BE PURCHASED ONLINE BUT ARE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT THE DOOR. This film is part of a triple bill with A Passion for Snow and the presentation: Restoring Olympic Films and includes a reception.

White Rock

TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT THE DOOR
Photograph © IOC. The Official Film of the Innsbruck 1976 Winter Olympics in a brand new restored version. Director’s Statement: “It is never easy to make a film on the Olympic Games that will theatrically engage audiences. By the time of its release most people have already seen the event on TV, so it has to deliver on a very different level than simple reportage. I concentrated on just a handful of chosen events rather than dissipate the focus across every sport and medal. The concept was to take the audience inside those winter sports—to feel the emotion and experience the dangers and majesty that the competitors felt. Rick Wakeman’s score added considerably to the visual and emotional experience. To bring the audience even closer to the action, James Coburn was brought in to act as “everyman,” helping the audience to identify, not only with the obvious dangers, but also with the competitors high levels of skill.” Shot in Panavision utilizing using vari-speed cameras with telephoto lenses up to 2000mm, White Rock was created to take the audience on a ride that was very different from the TV coverage. It resulted in an extensive worldwide theatrical release including the US, the UK and Japan.
The restoration: The film was digitally restored in 4K for the International Olympic Committee by Warner Bros. Motion Picture Imaging using the 35mm original anamorphic negative. The 4-track magnetic stereo sound was restored and re-mastered at Audio Mechanics in Burbank, CA.
TICKETS CANNOT BE PURCHASED ONLINE BUT ARE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT THE DOOR.

Oct
14
Mon
King Curling (King Curling) @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 14 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Ole Endresen
Norway | 2013 | Fiction | Norwegian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 90 minutes
Film source: Films Boutique
Sponsors: Eyes On The World

King Curling (King Curling)

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King Curling is nothing less than The Big Lebowski of curling movies. If that’s not enough to intrigue you, consider that it’s also full of deadpan humor, pill-popping weirdos, and heavyset, gaudily attired Norwegians with emotional problems. A riot of color, comedy, and, yes, curling, King Curling slots itself neatly into the tradition of sports comedies about ne’er-do-well misfits (The Bad News Bears and Kingpin come to mind) who band together – in as awkward and bizarre a manner as possible – to win The Big Game. In this case, that game is the championship of curling, a sport often mocked tepidly in late-night monologues around Winter Olympics time, but the film, as a kind of bonus feature, reveals it to be more complex and entertaining than it appears. The inherent ridiculousness of the sport – ice brooms, really? – rests knowingly at the heart of this fun, outsized comedy that will have you laughing out loud and rooting for the underdog misfit loser oddball emotionally maladjusted gang of bizarro curlers.

Oct
15
Tue
Lunchtime Shorts: Reality? @ BCA
Oct 15 @ 12:00 pm

A program of some of the most interesting and varied international documentary shorts.
Your ticket includes lunch. Come up to the Loraine B Goode room on the 2nd floor of BCA, grab your sandwich and drink, sit down and watch the films.

The Lunchtime Shorts Series is sponsored in part by Middlebury College

Program curated by: Orly Yadin

No Ordinary Passenger

Director: Cabell Hopkins
UK | 2012 | Documentary | 8 minutes

Noordinarypassenger_WEB

86 years old and positively fearless, Stan Dibben recalls his hair-raising, tarmac-skimming career as a World Champion passenger.

Coffee Time

Director: Maria Fredriksson
Sweden | 2011 | Documentary
Run Time: 14 minutes

Coffee Time

A quartet of proper Swedish ladies of a certain age get together for a coffee klatch; they nibble on sweet cakes, sip from fine china and discuss all the usual things: viagra, cock rings and orgasms. Just like your grandmother used to do.

The Stitches Speak

Director: Nina Sabnani
India | 2011 | Documentary | 10 minutes
Sponsor: Documentary Educational Resources

Stitches-Speak

After

Director: Lukasz Konopa
UK | 2011 | Documentary | 7 minutes
Playing in the program Lunchtime Shorts: Reality?

After, Lukasz Konopa

Film about contemporary life in Auschwitz. In an observation from dusk to dawn, it portrays the theatre of everyday life around the grim confines of this former concentration camp.

Americanized

Director: Abhi Singh
USA | 2013 | Documentary | 4 minutes

Americanized

Irish Folk Furniture

Director: Tony Donoghue
Ireland | 2012 | Documentary | 8 minutes

IrishFolkFurniture

A animation film that explores a local craftsman’s restoration of a rural piece of furniture in a small Irish community.

Abuelas (The Grandmothers)

Director: Afarin Eghbal
UK | 2011 | Documentary | 9 minutes

Abuelas

In a small apartment in Buenos Aires a grandmother (abuela) is surrounded by reminders of the tragedy that befell her family during Argentina’s military dictatorship. Using real life testimonials from the Grandmothers of May Square the films is a testament to the tenacity of the women who conitinue to fight for the truth about their missing relatives.

The Bubbleologist

Director: Jan Bednarz
UK | 2012 | Documentary | 6 minutes

Bubbleologist

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Rising From The Ashes @ ECHO
Oct 15 @ 3:30 pm
Director: T. C. Johnstone
USA, Rwanda | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: First Run Features
Sponsor: Old Spokes Home

Rising From The Ashes

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Two worlds collide when cycling legend Jock Boyer moves to Rwanda, Africa to help a group of struggling genocide survivors pursue their dream of a national team. The young cyclists, whose horrendous personal experiences in the 1994 genocide are still fresh in their minds, are determined to train and learn how to be professional athletes. The film’s journey to the finale at the London 2012 Olympic games is rivetting. We become gradually privy to the boys’ personal traumas and root for them to achieve their new life’s dreams. Narrated (and executive produced) by Forest Whitaker

Oct
16
Wed
The Ridge (Pura Vida) @ ECHO
Oct 16 @ 1:30 pm
Director: Pablo Irburu, Migueltxo Molina
Nepal, Spain | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 85 minutes
Film source: Dogwoof
Sponsor: Bobbie Lanahan
Special Note: US Premiere

The Ridge (Pura Vida)

GET TICKETS
This exciting and gorgeously photographed film will keep you at the edge of your seat. It tells the nail-biting and life-affirming story of a dangerous rescue mission in the Himalayan Mountains. The south wall of Mount Annapurna in the Nepalese Himalayas is known among climbers as the most dangerous climb in the world. To reach the mountain’s summit at over 8,000 meters above sea level, mountaineers have to traverse a seven-kilometer-long ridge at 7,500 meters – an impossible task, especially for “pure” climbers who brave the thin air without oxygen tanks. So when experienced Spanish climber Iñaki Ochoa de Olza falls seriously ill while crossing the ridge in 2008, his hopes are slim. After his climbing partner Horia Colibasanu sounds the alarm, 12 fellow climbers from all over the world (Switzerland, Kazakhstan, Russia and the United States) mount a highly dangerous rescue operation. We travel the world to let these 12 rescuers tell their stories in their home environments. Why would they risk their lives to reach these mountaintops? Whatever the result of the rescue will be, these 12 heroes show us that the human spirit is alive and well.

Tanta Agua (So Much Water) @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 16 @ 6:00 pm

Director: Ana Guevara, Leticia Jorge
Uruguay | 2012 | Fiction | Spanish w/English subtitles
Run Time: 96 minutes
Film source: Film Movement

Tanta Agua

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Winner of multiple awards at several international film festivals, Uruguay’s Tanta Agua is the directorial debut of Ana Guevara Pose and Leticia Jorge Romero. Simple in premise but emotionally complex, Tanta Agua (roughly translated, “So Much Water”) takes us along on a “fun” resort vacation as a divorced father (Guzzini) tries to reconnect with his kids, 13-year-old Lucía (Chouza, in a terrific performance) and 10-year-old Federico (Castiglioni). But the constant, torrential rain and the awkwardness between the family members make any sort of reconnection nearly impossible. Rather than play this situation for pathos, Pose and Romero extract from it gentle comedy and true insight into adolescence, especially in the film’s latter half, which focuses on Lucía’s misguided attempts at a summertime fling. Tanta Agua is the exact opposite of heavy-handed, leaving it up to the viewer to process and reflect on its emotional genuineness, and on the kind of uncomfortable family situation with which we can all identify.

Awards

Knight Grand Jury Prize – MIFF; Best First Feature – Guadalajara Film Festival

Byzantium @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 16 @ 8:00 pm
Director: Neil Jordan
Ireland | 2013 | Fiction | English
Run Time: 118 minutes
Film source: IFC Films
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Byzantium

Oscar-winning director Neil Jordan returns to the world of the undead, which he visited to great success with Interview with the Vampire in 1994. His latest, Byzantium, plumbs the sexual and psychological effects of vampirism on two ageless-but-young women whose unhappy craving for blood has rendered them unstuck in time and space. Eleanor (Saoirse Ronan, Oscar-nominated for Atonement) and Clara (rising star Gemma Arterton), by choice or by fate, must either succumb to their condition or risk their lives by seeking a cure. The world of Byzantium (the title refers to the run-down guesthouse in the faded resort town where Eleanor and Clara hole up) is rain spattered and neon-hued, vibrant in its sordidness and reflective of the characters’ razor’s-edge existence. Moody and bleak, yet shimmeringly beautiful, Byzantium is, on the surface, a vampire film, but, deeper down, a meditation on the ways that one’s choices in the past resonate in and shape the present – often with dire consequences.

Rising From The Ashes @ Film House
Oct 16 @ 8:30 pm
Director: T. C. Johnstone
USA, Rwanda | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: First Run Features
Sponsor: Old Spokes Home

Rising From The Ashes

GET TICKETS
Two worlds collide when cycling legend Jock Boyer moves to Rwanda, Africa to help a group of struggling genocide survivors pursue their dream of a national team. The young cyclists, whose horrendous personal experiences in the 1994 genocide are still fresh in their minds, are determined to train and learn how to be professional athletes. The film’s journey to the finale at the London 2012 Olympic games is rivetting. We become gradually privy to the boys’ personal traumas and root for them to achieve their new life’s dreams. Narrated (and executive produced) by Forest Whitaker

Oct
17
Thu
The Attack @ Film House
Oct 17 @ 7:30 pm
Director: Ziad Doueiri (read interview)
Lebanon | 2013 | Fiction | Hebrew, Arabic w/English subtitles
Film Source: Cohen Media Group
Sponsor: Barbara McGrew
Also: Film with discussion

The Attack

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This challenging film – a Lebanese-French-Qatari-Belgian coproduction – focuses on the seemingly small, interpersonal questions and connections which, in reality, underpin even the most dramatic political struggles. Set in present-day Israel, The Attack’s title refers not only to the Israel-Palestinian conflict but to a more metaphorical assault on the closest personal relationship of a doctor who, in the aftermath of a terrorist bombing, finds himself at the epicenter of the battle. The Attack, which has won festival awards and attracted great critical praise, asks two simple yet potentially harrowing questions of every one of its viewers: How well do you really know the people you love? And, furthermore, what are the consequences of truly knowing everything about them? The film walks the tightrope that just barely separates not only Arab and Jewish cultures, but love and hate, as well. It is the personalized approach that gives this film its universal focus.

Interview with Director Ziad Doueiri (PDF)

Laurence Anyways @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 17 @ 7:45 pm

Director: Xavier Nolan
Canada | 2013 | Fiction | French w/English subtitles
Run Time: 161 minutes
Film source: Breaking Glass Pictures

Laurence Anyways

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Winner of several major festival awards, Laurence Anyways is the third film from Quebeçois enfant terrible Xavier Dolan, whose films I Killed My Mother (2009) and Heartbeats (2010) were both international sensations. Evoking Rainer Werner Fassbinder (via Douglas Sirk), Wong Kar Wai, and Pedro Almodóvar, Dolan, not yet 25, has created a rich brew of daring cinematic accomplishment. A love story rendered impossible by the fluid nature of sexuality and identity, Laurence Anyways takes us through the many-gendered permutations of the romance of Laurence and Frédérique (Suzanne Clément, winner of the Un Certain Regard award for her performance at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival). Laurence, living as a man, reveals to his lover Frédérique that his life has been a lie, and that to be true to himself, he must live as a woman. Unsurprisingly, this revelation changes the nature of the couple’s romance, but not in ways that either of them would ever have expected. Bold, ambitious, and frank, Laurence Anyways is a challenging statement about gender, love, and human nature.

Awards

Best Canadian Feature film; Suzanne Clément – best Actress

Oct
18
Fri
King Curling (King Curling) @ Film House
Oct 18 @ 3:00 pm

Director: Ole Endresen
Norway | 2013 | Fiction | Norwegian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 90 minutes
Film source: Films Boutique
Sponsors: Eyes On The World 

King Curling (King Curling)

GET TICKETS
King Curling is nothing less than The Big Lebowski of curling movies. If that’s not enough to intrigue you, consider that it’s also full of deadpan humor, pill-popping weirdos, and heavyset, gaudily attired Norwegians with emotional problems. A riot of color, comedy, and, yes, curling, King Curling slots itself neatly into the tradition of sports comedies about ne’er-do-well misfits (The Bad News Bears and Kingpin come to mind) who band together – in as awkward and bizarre a manner as possible – to win The Big Game. In this case, that game is the championship of curling, a sport often mocked tepidly in late-night monologues around Winter Olympics time, but the film, as a kind of bonus feature, reveals it to be more complex and entertaining than it appears. The inherent ridiculousness of the sport – ice brooms, really? – rests knowingly at the heart of this fun, outsized comedy that will have you laughing out loud and rooting for the underdog misfit loser oddball emotionally maladjusted gang of bizarro curlers.

Byzantium @ ECHO
Oct 18 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Neil Jordan
Ireland | 2013 | Fiction | English
Run Time: 118 minutes
Film source: IFC Films
GET TICKETS

Byzantium

Oscar-winning director Neil Jordan returns to the world of the undead, which he visited to great success with Interview with the Vampire in 1994. His latest, Byzantium, plumbs the sexual and psychological effects of vampirism on two ageless-but-young women whose unhappy craving for blood has rendered them unstuck in time and space. Eleanor (Saoirse Ronan, Oscar-nominated for Atonement) and Clara (rising star Gemma Arterton), by choice or by fate, must either succumb to their condition or risk their lives by seeking a cure. The world of Byzantium (the title refers to the run-down guesthouse in the faded resort town where Eleanor and Clara hole up) is rain spattered and neon-hued, vibrant in its sordidness and reflective of the characters’ razor’s-edge existence. Moody and bleak, yet shimmeringly beautiful, Byzantium is, on the surface, a vampire film, but, deeper down, a meditation on the ways that one’s choices in the past resonate in and shape the present – often with dire consequences.

Oct
19
Sat
Laurence Anyways @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 19 @ 12:00 pm

Director: Xavier Nolan
Canada | 2013 | Fiction | French w/English subtitles
Run Time: 161 minutes
Film source: Breaking Glass Pictures

Laurence Anyways

GET TICKETS
Winner of several major festival awards, Laurence Anyways is the third film from Quebeçois enfant terrible Xavier Dolan, whose films I Killed My Mother (2009) and Heartbeats (2010) were both international sensations. Evoking Rainer Werner Fassbinder (via Douglas Sirk), Wong Kar Wai, and Pedro Almodóvar, Dolan, not yet 25, has created a rich brew of daring cinematic accomplishment. A love story rendered impossible by the fluid nature of sexuality and identity, Laurence Anyways takes us through the many-gendered permutations of the romance of Laurence and Frédérique (Suzanne Clément, winner of the Un Certain Regard award for her performance at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival). Laurence, living as a man, reveals to his lover Frédérique that his life has been a lie, and that to be true to himself, he must live as a woman. Unsurprisingly, this revelation changes the nature of the couple’s romance, but not in ways that either of them would ever have expected. Bold, ambitious, and frank, Laurence Anyways is a challenging statement about gender, love, and human nature.

Awards

Best Canadian Feature film; Suzanne Clément – best Actress

Short Term 12 @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 19 @ 5:15 pm

Director: Destin Daniel Cretton
USA | 2012 | Fiction
Run Time: 96 minutes
Film source: Cinedigm
Sponsor: Lorna-Kay Peal & Michael Smolin

Short Term 12

GET TICKETS
Winner of both the Grand Jury Narrative Feature and the Narrative Audience Award at this year’s SXSW Film Festival, Short Term 12 is moving, honest, and emotionally revelatory. Focusing on the residents and caretakers at a residential foster care center for at-risk teenagers, Short Term 12 explores the difficult and extremely human realities of what it means to take care of another person. The story is told largely through the eyes of Grace (rising star Brie Larson, who won Best Actress at the Locarno Film Festival for her performance), the facility’s supervisor, as she tries to find ways to deal with her own life as well as those of the residents. Grace is put to the test with the arrival of Jayden, a troubled new arrival with whom she finds a special connection. Shot in an unobtrusive, handheld style, Short Term 12 is raw, sincere, and, at times, unexpectedly funny, with terrific performances at every level.

Awards

Grand Jury Award SXSW, Best Actress Locarno Film Festival

Oct
20
Sun
The Genius of Marian @ ECHO
Oct 20 @ 1:00 pm
Director: Banker White, Anna Fitch
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 84 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker
Sponsor: Nora and Nancy Bercaw in honor of Beau Bercaw 

Playing with: There’s No Hole in My Head
Director:
 Alison Segar | USA | 2011 | Documentary | 15 minutes

Genius of Marian

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A visually rich, emotionally complex story that follows Pam White in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease as her son, the filmmaker, documents her struggles to retain her sense of self. After she is diagnosed at age 61 life begins to change for Pam and everyone around her. Pam’s husband grapples with his changing role from partner to caregiver. Her adult children each find ways to show their love and support while mourning the slow loss of their mother. And Pam deals with the fear that she will be institutionalized for her disease. This delicate film treats the subject with a humor and a light touch while serving as a meditation on the role of memory in creating legacy.

 

Director’s Statment

I have been making documentary films for more than a decade and each project has been deeply important to me in its own way.  My most recent film, THE GENIUS OF MARIAN, is the most personal and most challenging project I have ever undertaken. I approached this film both as a loving son and as a patient observer.  It is a story about my extraordinary mother, Pam White, and her struggle with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. On the surface, the film is about my family’s efforts to come to terms with the changes Alzheimer’s disease brings. But it is also a meditation on the meaning of family, the power of art and the beautiful and painful ways we cope with illness and loss. The last few years have been a roller coaster of emotions, filled with frustration, sadness, joy and celebration. I didn’t originally set out to make a documentary film about my mother’s disease. The project began as a series of informal recorded conversations with my mom in the months after her Alzheimer’s diagnosis in 2009. She had begun writing a memoir called “The Genius of Marian” about her own mother (my grandmother), Marian Williams Steele. Marian was a well-loved and well-known painter and was in many ways the matriarch of our family. In 2001, Marian died of Alzheimer’s disease at the age of 89.

Soon after my mom started writing the book, she began to struggle with typing and other mental tasks. To help her continue the project, I began filming our conversations. For the next three years, I recorded both the big events and the small details of my family’s changing reality. I filmed my parents recounting stories of how they met and fell in love. I captured my mother’s delight at the birth of her grandchildren. But I also documented the slow erosion of my mother’s ability to dress and feed herself, her waning independence, and her fierce resistance to accepting help from professional caregivers.

I grew up feeling like my mom could do it all—and often, she did. She worked full-time while raising my siblings and me, maintained deep friendships and dedicated herself to helping others, both in her personal life and in her career as a therapist. She loved being a mom and encouraged us to be ourselves, always stressing how important it was to talk about our feelings, especially when times were tough. That’s why it was especially painful to see her frozen by the shame of her diagnosis, unable to talk openly about what she was experiencing. And despite being a loving, willing and available family, we also struggled to share our thoughts and feelings with each other. Before she was ready to talk candidly about her diagnosis, my mom and I were able to connect by remembering Marian, someone we’d both loved and had lost to the disease that was now affecting my mother. These intimate conversations became a kind of therapy space and my mom began to share the complex emotions related to what she was going through. At the same time, filming with the other members of my family provided a way for each of us to celebrate my mother’s life while processing difficult feelings about how she was changing. I am grateful to my siblings and father for having the bravery to share so openly. I have been especially moved by my father, who displayed tremendous compassion and loyalty while grappling with his changing role from partner to caregiver. The spirit of my mother’s book project was my point of departure — the deep desire to memorialize someone you love and to connect with the difficult and complex emotions that surround losing them. My goal is to create a film that finds light and beauty in a place often shrouded in shame and confusion. A patient approach to production has helped me capture the essence of my family’s story. I’ve shared warmth and intimacy in conversations with my mother, laid bare our family’s challenges in caring for her and allowed myself to feel the silence that increasingly fills my parents’ house. I believe the story is deeply important and powerfully told and I trust it will resonate not only for those directly affected by Alzheimer’s disease, but for with anyone who has had to reconcile complicated emotions around aging and loss. It is from this place that I know we have created something special.

~ Banker White, Director