Calendar

Oct
11
Fri
Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase 1 @ Film House
Oct 11 @ 2:30 pm

THE WORST THING ABOUT COMING OUT
Director: Rob Barracano & Champlain Filmmaking Students Documentary
Run Time: 60 minutes
Sponsor: The Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase is sponsored by Ben & Jerry’s and the Vermont Arts Council
FREE SCREENING Screening free, recommended donation of $5+.
World Premiere.
Followed by panel discussion at 3:45
What is the worst thing that happens when coming out as gay, lesbian, bisexual, trans-gender or queer? The answers, and much more are revealed in this touching and inspiring film. A feature length documentary derived from the interviews on the website, Worstthingaboutcomingout.com an on-line repository for queer community coming out stories, aimed at serving queer folks that are still in the closet. Read more…

Panel: Self-Identity + Home: Ourselves in Our Community @ Film House
Oct 11 @ 3:45 pm
Talks & Panels
Sponsor: Champlain College

FREE TO ATTEND
Panel accompanies the screening of The Worst Thing About Coming Out and celebrates National Coming Out Day.
Panelists include: Rob Barracano, Dr. Eric Ronis, teacher, Dr Ame Lambert – of Champlain College, Dr. Kim Fountain of RU12, Representative Joanna Cole, John Chagnon, Health & Wellness Coordinator, RU12 and Tate Bates who appears in the film.

“To thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.” ~ William Shakespeare

Opening Night Party @ Signal Kitchen
Oct 11 @ 8:30 pm

Opening Night at Signal Kitchen

Opening Night Party @ Signal Kitchen

Awards announced for Vermont filmmakers, prizes given, DJ Disco Phantom, food and cash bar. All at the coolest music venue in town, Signal Kitchen.

 

Signal Kitchen

Oct
12
Sat
Short Term 12 @ Film House
Oct 12 @ 8:15 pm

Director: Destin Daniel Cretton
USA | 2012 | Fiction | French w/English subtitles
Run Time: 96 minutes
Film source: Cinedigm
Sponsor: Lorna-Kay Peal & Michael Smolin

Short Term 12

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Winner of both the Grand Jury Narrative Feature and the Narrative Audience Award at this year’s SXSW Film Festival, Short Term 12 is moving, honest, and emotionally revelatory. Focusing on the residents and caretakers at a residential foster care center for at-risk teenagers, Short Term 12 explores the difficult and extremely human realities of what it means to take care of another person. The story is told largely through the eyes of Grace (rising star Brie Larson, who won Best Actress at the Locarno Film Festival for her performance), the facility’s supervisor, as she tries to find ways to deal with her own life as well as those of the residents. Grace is put to the test with the arrival of Jayden, a troubled new arrival with whom she finds a special connection. Shot in an unobtrusive, handheld style, Short Term 12 is raw, sincere, and, at times, unexpectedly funny, with terrific performances at every level.

Awards

Grand Jury Award SXSW, Best Actress Locarno Film Festival

Oct
16
Wed
Tanta Agua (So Much Water) @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 16 @ 6:00 pm

Director: Ana Guevara, Leticia Jorge
Uruguay | 2012 | Fiction | Spanish w/English subtitles
Run Time: 96 minutes
Film source: Film Movement

Tanta Agua

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Winner of multiple awards at several international film festivals, Uruguay’s Tanta Agua is the directorial debut of Ana Guevara Pose and Leticia Jorge Romero. Simple in premise but emotionally complex, Tanta Agua (roughly translated, “So Much Water”) takes us along on a “fun” resort vacation as a divorced father (Guzzini) tries to reconnect with his kids, 13-year-old Lucía (Chouza, in a terrific performance) and 10-year-old Federico (Castiglioni). But the constant, torrential rain and the awkwardness between the family members make any sort of reconnection nearly impossible. Rather than play this situation for pathos, Pose and Romero extract from it gentle comedy and true insight into adolescence, especially in the film’s latter half, which focuses on Lucía’s misguided attempts at a summertime fling. Tanta Agua is the exact opposite of heavy-handed, leaving it up to the viewer to process and reflect on its emotional genuineness, and on the kind of uncomfortable family situation with which we can all identify.

Awards

Knight Grand Jury Prize – MIFF; Best First Feature – Guadalajara Film Festival

Oct
17
Thu
The Attack @ Film House
Oct 17 @ 7:30 pm
Director: Ziad Doueiri (read interview)
Lebanon | 2013 | Fiction | Hebrew, Arabic w/English subtitles
Film Source: Cohen Media Group
Sponsor: Barbara McGrew
Also: Film with discussion

The Attack

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This challenging film – a Lebanese-French-Qatari-Belgian coproduction – focuses on the seemingly small, interpersonal questions and connections which, in reality, underpin even the most dramatic political struggles. Set in present-day Israel, The Attack’s title refers not only to the Israel-Palestinian conflict but to a more metaphorical assault on the closest personal relationship of a doctor who, in the aftermath of a terrorist bombing, finds himself at the epicenter of the battle. The Attack, which has won festival awards and attracted great critical praise, asks two simple yet potentially harrowing questions of every one of its viewers: How well do you really know the people you love? And, furthermore, what are the consequences of truly knowing everything about them? The film walks the tightrope that just barely separates not only Arab and Jewish cultures, but love and hate, as well. It is the personalized approach that gives this film its universal focus.

Interview with Director Ziad Doueiri (PDF)

Laurence Anyways @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 17 @ 7:45 pm

Director: Xavier Nolan
Canada | 2013 | Fiction | French w/English subtitles
Run Time: 161 minutes
Film source: Breaking Glass Pictures

Laurence Anyways

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Winner of several major festival awards, Laurence Anyways is the third film from Quebeçois enfant terrible Xavier Dolan, whose films I Killed My Mother (2009) and Heartbeats (2010) were both international sensations. Evoking Rainer Werner Fassbinder (via Douglas Sirk), Wong Kar Wai, and Pedro Almodóvar, Dolan, not yet 25, has created a rich brew of daring cinematic accomplishment. A love story rendered impossible by the fluid nature of sexuality and identity, Laurence Anyways takes us through the many-gendered permutations of the romance of Laurence and Frédérique (Suzanne Clément, winner of the Un Certain Regard award for her performance at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival). Laurence, living as a man, reveals to his lover Frédérique that his life has been a lie, and that to be true to himself, he must live as a woman. Unsurprisingly, this revelation changes the nature of the couple’s romance, but not in ways that either of them would ever have expected. Bold, ambitious, and frank, Laurence Anyways is a challenging statement about gender, love, and human nature.

Awards

Best Canadian Feature film; Suzanne Clément – best Actress

Oct
19
Sat
Laurence Anyways @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 19 @ 12:00 pm

Director: Xavier Nolan
Canada | 2013 | Fiction | French w/English subtitles
Run Time: 161 minutes
Film source: Breaking Glass Pictures

Laurence Anyways

GET TICKETS
Winner of several major festival awards, Laurence Anyways is the third film from Quebeçois enfant terrible Xavier Dolan, whose films I Killed My Mother (2009) and Heartbeats (2010) were both international sensations. Evoking Rainer Werner Fassbinder (via Douglas Sirk), Wong Kar Wai, and Pedro Almodóvar, Dolan, not yet 25, has created a rich brew of daring cinematic accomplishment. A love story rendered impossible by the fluid nature of sexuality and identity, Laurence Anyways takes us through the many-gendered permutations of the romance of Laurence and Frédérique (Suzanne Clément, winner of the Un Certain Regard award for her performance at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival). Laurence, living as a man, reveals to his lover Frédérique that his life has been a lie, and that to be true to himself, he must live as a woman. Unsurprisingly, this revelation changes the nature of the couple’s romance, but not in ways that either of them would ever have expected. Bold, ambitious, and frank, Laurence Anyways is a challenging statement about gender, love, and human nature.

Awards

Best Canadian Feature film; Suzanne Clément – best Actress

Short Term 12 @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 19 @ 5:15 pm

Director: Destin Daniel Cretton
USA | 2012 | Fiction
Run Time: 96 minutes
Film source: Cinedigm
Sponsor: Lorna-Kay Peal & Michael Smolin

Short Term 12

GET TICKETS
Winner of both the Grand Jury Narrative Feature and the Narrative Audience Award at this year’s SXSW Film Festival, Short Term 12 is moving, honest, and emotionally revelatory. Focusing on the residents and caretakers at a residential foster care center for at-risk teenagers, Short Term 12 explores the difficult and extremely human realities of what it means to take care of another person. The story is told largely through the eyes of Grace (rising star Brie Larson, who won Best Actress at the Locarno Film Festival for her performance), the facility’s supervisor, as she tries to find ways to deal with her own life as well as those of the residents. Grace is put to the test with the arrival of Jayden, a troubled new arrival with whom she finds a special connection. Shot in an unobtrusive, handheld style, Short Term 12 is raw, sincere, and, at times, unexpectedly funny, with terrific performances at every level.

Awards

Grand Jury Award SXSW, Best Actress Locarno Film Festival

Oct
20
Sun
The Genius of Marian @ ECHO
Oct 20 @ 1:00 pm
Director: Banker White, Anna Fitch
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 84 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker
Sponsor: Nora and Nancy Bercaw in honor of Beau Bercaw 

Playing with: There’s No Hole in My Head
Director:
 Alison Segar | USA | 2011 | Documentary | 15 minutes

Genius of Marian

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A visually rich, emotionally complex story that follows Pam White in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease as her son, the filmmaker, documents her struggles to retain her sense of self. After she is diagnosed at age 61 life begins to change for Pam and everyone around her. Pam’s husband grapples with his changing role from partner to caregiver. Her adult children each find ways to show their love and support while mourning the slow loss of their mother. And Pam deals with the fear that she will be institutionalized for her disease. This delicate film treats the subject with a humor and a light touch while serving as a meditation on the role of memory in creating legacy.

 

Director’s Statment

I have been making documentary films for more than a decade and each project has been deeply important to me in its own way.  My most recent film, THE GENIUS OF MARIAN, is the most personal and most challenging project I have ever undertaken. I approached this film both as a loving son and as a patient observer.  It is a story about my extraordinary mother, Pam White, and her struggle with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. On the surface, the film is about my family’s efforts to come to terms with the changes Alzheimer’s disease brings. But it is also a meditation on the meaning of family, the power of art and the beautiful and painful ways we cope with illness and loss. The last few years have been a roller coaster of emotions, filled with frustration, sadness, joy and celebration. I didn’t originally set out to make a documentary film about my mother’s disease. The project began as a series of informal recorded conversations with my mom in the months after her Alzheimer’s diagnosis in 2009. She had begun writing a memoir called “The Genius of Marian” about her own mother (my grandmother), Marian Williams Steele. Marian was a well-loved and well-known painter and was in many ways the matriarch of our family. In 2001, Marian died of Alzheimer’s disease at the age of 89.

Soon after my mom started writing the book, she began to struggle with typing and other mental tasks. To help her continue the project, I began filming our conversations. For the next three years, I recorded both the big events and the small details of my family’s changing reality. I filmed my parents recounting stories of how they met and fell in love. I captured my mother’s delight at the birth of her grandchildren. But I also documented the slow erosion of my mother’s ability to dress and feed herself, her waning independence, and her fierce resistance to accepting help from professional caregivers.

I grew up feeling like my mom could do it all—and often, she did. She worked full-time while raising my siblings and me, maintained deep friendships and dedicated herself to helping others, both in her personal life and in her career as a therapist. She loved being a mom and encouraged us to be ourselves, always stressing how important it was to talk about our feelings, especially when times were tough. That’s why it was especially painful to see her frozen by the shame of her diagnosis, unable to talk openly about what she was experiencing. And despite being a loving, willing and available family, we also struggled to share our thoughts and feelings with each other. Before she was ready to talk candidly about her diagnosis, my mom and I were able to connect by remembering Marian, someone we’d both loved and had lost to the disease that was now affecting my mother. These intimate conversations became a kind of therapy space and my mom began to share the complex emotions related to what she was going through. At the same time, filming with the other members of my family provided a way for each of us to celebrate my mother’s life while processing difficult feelings about how she was changing. I am grateful to my siblings and father for having the bravery to share so openly. I have been especially moved by my father, who displayed tremendous compassion and loyalty while grappling with his changing role from partner to caregiver. The spirit of my mother’s book project was my point of departure — the deep desire to memorialize someone you love and to connect with the difficult and complex emotions that surround losing them. My goal is to create a film that finds light and beauty in a place often shrouded in shame and confusion. A patient approach to production has helped me capture the essence of my family’s story. I’ve shared warmth and intimacy in conversations with my mother, laid bare our family’s challenges in caring for her and allowed myself to feel the silence that increasingly fills my parents’ house. I believe the story is deeply important and powerfully told and I trust it will resonate not only for those directly affected by Alzheimer’s disease, but for with anyone who has had to reconcile complicated emotions around aging and loss. It is from this place that I know we have created something special.

~ Banker White, Director