Calendar

Oct
11
Fri
The Crash Reel @ Film House
Oct 11 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Lucy Walker
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 108 minutes
Film source: Phase4Films
Sponsor: Anonymous donor
Special Event: Opening Night Film. Special ticket prices for this film – 6-pack and 10-pack discounts don’t apply. All proceeds go to Special Olympics Vermont. Kevin & David Pearce in attendance. Preceded by opening night reception at 5pm in the Lakeside Lobby outside The Film House, Food provided courtesy of Sugarsnap, cash bar. Screening followed by Opening Night party at 8:30 pm, at Signal Kitchen. Announcement and presentation of Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase Awards. Party sponsored by Signal Kitchen.
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Crash Reel

It’s the training season for the 2010 winter Olympics. World-class snowboarder Kevin Pearce swings up the half pipe and launches into the air. He spins into a double cork 1080. It’s one of the toughest moves in his – or any – repertoire, and he comes back down, hard and fast, towards the ramp. The tail end of his board catches the ice. He falls forward with no time to put out his arms. His full weight lands on his head and neck. Academy Award-winning documentarian Lucy Walker’s film seamlessly combines twenty years of stunning action footage with vérité footage and interviews as it follows Kevin and exposes the irresistible but potentially fatal appeal of extreme sports. An escalating rivalry between Kevin and his nemesis Shaun White in the run-up to the 2010 Olympics leaves Shaun on top of the Olympic podium and Kevin in a coma following his accident. Kevin’s tight-knit Vermont family flies to his side and helps him rebuild his life as a brain injury survivor. But when he insists he wants to return to the sport he still loves, his family intervenes with his eloquent brother David speaking for all of them when he says, “I just don’t want you to die.” Kevin’s doctors caution him that even a small blow to the head could be enough to kill him. Will Kevin defy them and insist on pursuing his passion? With his now impaired skills, what other options does he have? How much risk is too much?

Awards

Audience Awards: SXSW, HotDocs

Oct
13
Sun
Magnetic Reconnection @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 11:00 am
Director: Kyle Armstrong
Canada | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 6 minutes
Note: Playing with It’s Such a Beautiful Day

Magnetic-Reconnection

Contrasting the northern lights of Canada’s north with the harsh landscapes and decaying manmade debris littered around Churchill Manitoba.

The Ridge (Pura Vida) @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 1:15 pm
Director: Pablo Irburu, Migueltxo Molina
Nepal, Spain | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 85 minutes
Film source: Dogwoof
Sponsor: Bobbie Lanahan
Special Note: US Premiere

The Ridge (Pura Vida)

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This exciting and gorgeously photographed film will keep you at the edge of your seat. It tells the nail-biting and life-affirming story of a dangerous rescue mission in the Himalayan Mountains. The south wall of Mount Annapurna in the Nepalese Himalayas is known among climbers as the most dangerous climb in the world. To reach the mountain’s summit at over 8,000 meters above sea level, mountaineers have to traverse a seven-kilometer-long ridge at 7,500 meters – an impossible task, especially for “pure” climbers who brave the thin air without oxygen tanks. So when experienced Spanish climber Iñaki Ochoa de Olza falls seriously ill while crossing the ridge in 2008, his hopes are slim. After his climbing partner Horia Colibasanu sounds the alarm, 12 fellow climbers from all over the world (Switzerland, Kazakhstan, Russia and the United States) mount a highly dangerous rescue operation. We travel the world to let these 12 rescuers tell their stories in their home environments. Why would they risk their lives to reach these mountaintops? Whatever the result of the rescue will be, these 12 heroes show us that the human spirit is alive and well.

A Passion for Snow @ Film House
Oct 13 @ 4:00 pm
Directors: Producer: Lisa Denmore;  Assoc Producer:  Rick Moulton; Exec. Producer: Steve Waterhouse
USA | 2013 | Documentary | English
Run Time: 60 minutes
Film source: biggreen65.com
Sponsor: Seventh Generation
Ticketing Note: This film is part of a triple bill with White Rock and the presentation: Restoring Olympic Films and includes a reception sponsored by SunCommon.

A Passion for Snow

GET TICKETS Note: Special triple bill ticketing including White Rock & Restoring Olympic Films.
100-plus years of skiing history from Dartmouth, based on the book “Passion for Skiing” by Dartmouth graduate Stephen Waterhouse. Breathtaking newly-discovered footage and compelling 1st-hand accounts from alumni who helped transform the sport of skiing into the $25 billion industry it is today- are masterfully edited by VT filmmaker Rick Moulton. The film opens with footage of “The Grinch,” created by Dartmouth grad Theodor Geisel – aka Dr. Seuss – sledding downhill towards Whoville. Narrated by Buck Henry and followed by stories on how ski racing, the 10th Mtn Div, ski resorts, the Olympics/Paralympics and much more got started,

SPECIAL EVENT

Q&A led by the filmmakers and Olympic Coach John Morton ,with former Olympians in the audience, including Tiger Shaw (President-to-be of the US Ski Association), members of the Cochran Family, and a number of Dartmouth’s all time racing stars. Followed by reception at 5:30 pm in the Main Street Landing Boardroom to launch the Sport & Film series, food and cash bar. Sponsored by SunCommon.

Reception for A Passion for Snow @ Film House Boardroom
Oct 13 @ 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm

A special reception to celebrate A Passion for Snow and our Sport & Film series
Food provided, cash bar.
Sponsors:  SunCommon. with support from Dartmouth Regional Affairs
catering-4

All ticket holders for A Passion for Snow  and White Rock are invited.

White Rock @ Film House
Oct 13 @ 6:45 pm
Director: Tony Maylem
UK | 1977 | Documentary
Run Time: 80 minutes
Film source: IOC
Sponsor: Smugglers Notch Resort
Special Note: North American Premiere. Introduced by Adrian Wood.
Ticketing Note:TICKETS CANNOT BE PURCHASED ONLINE BUT ARE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT THE DOOR. This film is part of a triple bill with A Passion for Snow and the presentation: Restoring Olympic Films and includes a reception.

White Rock

TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT THE DOOR
Photograph © IOC. The Official Film of the Innsbruck 1976 Winter Olympics in a brand new restored version. Director’s Statement: “It is never easy to make a film on the Olympic Games that will theatrically engage audiences. By the time of its release most people have already seen the event on TV, so it has to deliver on a very different level than simple reportage. I concentrated on just a handful of chosen events rather than dissipate the focus across every sport and medal. The concept was to take the audience inside those winter sports—to feel the emotion and experience the dangers and majesty that the competitors felt. Rick Wakeman’s score added considerably to the visual and emotional experience. To bring the audience even closer to the action, James Coburn was brought in to act as “everyman,” helping the audience to identify, not only with the obvious dangers, but also with the competitors high levels of skill.” Shot in Panavision utilizing using vari-speed cameras with telephoto lenses up to 2000mm, White Rock was created to take the audience on a ride that was very different from the TV coverage. It resulted in an extensive worldwide theatrical release including the US, the UK and Japan.
The restoration: The film was digitally restored in 4K for the International Olympic Committee by Warner Bros. Motion Picture Imaging using the 35mm original anamorphic negative. The 4-track magnetic stereo sound was restored and re-mastered at Audio Mechanics in Burbank, CA.
TICKETS CANNOT BE PURCHASED ONLINE BUT ARE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT THE DOOR.

Oct
14
Mon
King Curling (King Curling) @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 14 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Ole Endresen
Norway | 2013 | Fiction | Norwegian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 90 minutes
Film source: Films Boutique
Sponsors: Eyes On The World

King Curling (King Curling)

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King Curling is nothing less than The Big Lebowski of curling movies. If that’s not enough to intrigue you, consider that it’s also full of deadpan humor, pill-popping weirdos, and heavyset, gaudily attired Norwegians with emotional problems. A riot of color, comedy, and, yes, curling, King Curling slots itself neatly into the tradition of sports comedies about ne’er-do-well misfits (The Bad News Bears and Kingpin come to mind) who band together – in as awkward and bizarre a manner as possible – to win The Big Game. In this case, that game is the championship of curling, a sport often mocked tepidly in late-night monologues around Winter Olympics time, but the film, as a kind of bonus feature, reveals it to be more complex and entertaining than it appears. The inherent ridiculousness of the sport – ice brooms, really? – rests knowingly at the heart of this fun, outsized comedy that will have you laughing out loud and rooting for the underdog misfit loser oddball emotionally maladjusted gang of bizarro curlers.

Oct
15
Tue
Rising From The Ashes @ ECHO
Oct 15 @ 3:30 pm
Director: T. C. Johnstone
USA, Rwanda | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: First Run Features
Sponsor: Old Spokes Home

Rising From The Ashes

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Two worlds collide when cycling legend Jock Boyer moves to Rwanda, Africa to help a group of struggling genocide survivors pursue their dream of a national team. The young cyclists, whose horrendous personal experiences in the 1994 genocide are still fresh in their minds, are determined to train and learn how to be professional athletes. The film’s journey to the finale at the London 2012 Olympic games is rivetting. We become gradually privy to the boys’ personal traumas and root for them to achieve their new life’s dreams. Narrated (and executive produced) by Forest Whitaker

Oct
16
Wed
The Ridge (Pura Vida) @ ECHO
Oct 16 @ 1:30 pm
Director: Pablo Irburu, Migueltxo Molina
Nepal, Spain | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 85 minutes
Film source: Dogwoof
Sponsor: Bobbie Lanahan
Special Note: US Premiere

The Ridge (Pura Vida)

GET TICKETS
This exciting and gorgeously photographed film will keep you at the edge of your seat. It tells the nail-biting and life-affirming story of a dangerous rescue mission in the Himalayan Mountains. The south wall of Mount Annapurna in the Nepalese Himalayas is known among climbers as the most dangerous climb in the world. To reach the mountain’s summit at over 8,000 meters above sea level, mountaineers have to traverse a seven-kilometer-long ridge at 7,500 meters – an impossible task, especially for “pure” climbers who brave the thin air without oxygen tanks. So when experienced Spanish climber Iñaki Ochoa de Olza falls seriously ill while crossing the ridge in 2008, his hopes are slim. After his climbing partner Horia Colibasanu sounds the alarm, 12 fellow climbers from all over the world (Switzerland, Kazakhstan, Russia and the United States) mount a highly dangerous rescue operation. We travel the world to let these 12 rescuers tell their stories in their home environments. Why would they risk their lives to reach these mountaintops? Whatever the result of the rescue will be, these 12 heroes show us that the human spirit is alive and well.

Rising From The Ashes @ Film House
Oct 16 @ 8:30 pm
Director: T. C. Johnstone
USA, Rwanda | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: First Run Features
Sponsor: Old Spokes Home

Rising From The Ashes

GET TICKETS
Two worlds collide when cycling legend Jock Boyer moves to Rwanda, Africa to help a group of struggling genocide survivors pursue their dream of a national team. The young cyclists, whose horrendous personal experiences in the 1994 genocide are still fresh in their minds, are determined to train and learn how to be professional athletes. The film’s journey to the finale at the London 2012 Olympic games is rivetting. We become gradually privy to the boys’ personal traumas and root for them to achieve their new life’s dreams. Narrated (and executive produced) by Forest Whitaker

Oct
17
Thu
Laurence Anyways @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 17 @ 7:45 pm

Director: Xavier Nolan
Canada | 2013 | Fiction | French w/English subtitles
Run Time: 161 minutes
Film source: Breaking Glass Pictures

Laurence Anyways

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Winner of several major festival awards, Laurence Anyways is the third film from Quebeçois enfant terrible Xavier Dolan, whose films I Killed My Mother (2009) and Heartbeats (2010) were both international sensations. Evoking Rainer Werner Fassbinder (via Douglas Sirk), Wong Kar Wai, and Pedro Almodóvar, Dolan, not yet 25, has created a rich brew of daring cinematic accomplishment. A love story rendered impossible by the fluid nature of sexuality and identity, Laurence Anyways takes us through the many-gendered permutations of the romance of Laurence and Frédérique (Suzanne Clément, winner of the Un Certain Regard award for her performance at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival). Laurence, living as a man, reveals to his lover Frédérique that his life has been a lie, and that to be true to himself, he must live as a woman. Unsurprisingly, this revelation changes the nature of the couple’s romance, but not in ways that either of them would ever have expected. Bold, ambitious, and frank, Laurence Anyways is a challenging statement about gender, love, and human nature.

Awards

Best Canadian Feature film; Suzanne Clément – best Actress

Oct
18
Fri
Lunchtime Shorts: On the Edge @ BCA
Oct 18 @ 12:00 pm

A special program of short experimental films, curated by Carole Zucker.

The Lunchtime Shorts Series is sponsored in part by Middlebury College

Carole Zucker is a Professor Emeritus of Film Studies at Concordia University in Montreal, where she taught for 35 years. She has published 7 books and is working on a biography of the acting teacher, Stella Adler. Zucker teaches acting workshops in Montreal and the Burlington area, and will be teaching acting for Film Production students at Champlain College.

Eigenheim

Eigenhiem
Directors: Anja Dornieden and Juan David González Monroy | Germany | 2012 | Experimental | 16 minutes

In the German Democratic Republic children played with dollhouses made to resemble the type of life they would one day grow up to have. Now many of these houses can be found for sale on Ebay or in collectors’ hands.
The dollhouses that survive do so as idealized images of a time and place that no longer exists. Through the words of their past and new owners, Eigenheim looks at the memories that once dwelled in these spaces to explore the remnants of a lost world..
About the Director: Anja Dornieden is a filmmaker currently living and working in Berlin. She obtained a Fulbright Scholarship to study at The New School University from 2007 until 2010. During her time in New York she started making her own documentary and experimental films in Super8 and 16mm.

I Was Here

I-was-here
Director: Phillipe Leonard | Canada/Quebec | 2008 | Experimental | 5 minutes

These images were captured during a long afternoon spent sitting in front of the Pantheon in Rome, paced by the sound of a shutter regularly opening and closing for long exposures whose duration was counted off in a whisper. At precise intervals, the photosensitive surface recorded the constant flow of tourists, people-watchers, cars and animals as they moved, stopped, gathered, and took photos. The historic building thus reveals itself as a magnet whose pull on people has lasted for centuries. I Was Here is a reference to the common phrase often found scratched on public walls, marks left as visible proof of a person’s visit to a place. Like that age-old practice, travel photography is an attempt to record a person’s presence in a particular place – a photographed place taken home as proof. The soundtrack comes from the same place, but from a different timeline: it was compiled from the audio tracks of amateur videos posted to YouTube. These audio snippets, all recorded in front of the same landmark, tell a collective story through each “I” that has recorded a visit to that same piazza. The clips of murmuring crowds were then edited and manipulated to give them a particular synchronization with the images.
About the Director: Philippe Leonard is a filmmaker living and working between Montreal and New York. His artistic practice explores still and moving images through film, photography, performance and installations emphasizing a hybrid approach between analogue and digital techniques. His theoretical and aesthetic reflections focus on the temporality and spectral dimension of physical spaces, sensory documentary practices and urbanism. Distributed by Light Cone and CFMDC, his work has been showcased in notable international contexts such as the Rotterdam International Film Festival (Netherlands), Festival des Cinémas Différents (Paris), Cineteca di Bologna (Italy), Festival du nouveau cinéma (Montreal), EXiS Experimental Film and Video Festival (Seoul), European Media Arts Festival (Germany), O ‘Gallery (Milan), Museo Nitsch (Naples), Edinburgh International Film Festival (UK), Annecy International animated film festival (France), Anthology Film Archive (NYC), etc. As a cinematographer, he is involved in artistic, documentary and commercial audiovisual projects, using a broad range of cameras and formats: Super 8, 16mm, 35mm, HD, etc. He is a member of the Montreal collective of experimental cinema Double Negative

Lacuna

Lacuna

Director: Shannon Harris | Canada | 2008 | Experimental | 9 minutesLacuna: 1. an empty space or a missing part; a gap; an absence. 2. a discontinuity in an anatomical structure.. A portrait of open-air theaters documented under the strange light of day, emptied of the once present hum of human voices, radioed-in soundtracks and tires on gravel

L’un Ne Va Pas Sans L’autre (One doesn’t Go Without the Other)

one doesn't go….
Director: Audréane Beaucage | France | Experimental | 7 minutes

L’un ne va pas sans l’autre is a 16mm, dance- movement film It concerns a journey to a mountaintop by a solo dancer, and two couples who act as his doubles. It is inspired by Japanese Butoh dance. The main character is an incarnation of the union between the anima and animus, somewhere  between male and female. His notion of self begins in water – in which he was born. Then  he becomes conscious of the outside world and loneliness, and finally comes to terms with his solitude and and grows into an independent human being.
About the director: Audréane Beaucage is a young experimental filmmaker from Montreal, whose work revolves around movement, light and nature. The Quebecoise filmmaker has made twenty films and video shorts.

Ritournelle

Becks_Ritournelle_5
Director: Christopher Becks | Netherlands | Experimental | 3 minutes

Working independently in two different cities, Peter Miller and Christopher Becks composed the elegantly intimate corps exquis Ritournelle: Miller created the melodic yet haunting soundtrack which Becks used as the inspiration for the 16mm film, set entirely in the confines of Becks’ Berlin apartment. The subtle beauty of light beams bouncing off the surfaces of the apartment’s rooms slowly reveals the spatial context. Circles of white light dancing across the darkness of the screen give the feeling of awakening in the early morning to glimpses of daylight sneaking through shrouded curtains. The audio track works in harmony with the soft imagery to create a lovely warmth, a respite from the frenetic action of the first three films which sets the tone for the quiet, focused observations that pervade the second half of the program. Becks is Canadian.

The Broken Altar

Broken Altar
Director: Mike Rollo | Canada | Experimental | 20 minutes

A portrait of open-air theaters documented under the strange light of day, emptied of the once present hum of human voices, radioed-in soundtracks and tires on gravel. Scripting the landscape and exploring the residue of a cinematic history, The Broken Altar forms a sculptural treatment of the architectural artifacts of these abandoned and barren spaces: speaker boxes rise from tall grass like grave markers and the screens themselves are monumental, sepulchral in their peeling whiteness.
About the director: Born and raised in Saskatchewan, Mike Rollo obtained a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Film Production at the University of Regina and a Master of Fine Arts in Studio Arts at Concordia University. His work explores first person cinema and experimental approaches to documentary filmmaking. Rollo’s films and videos have been shown at festivals, galleries, conferences and venues internationally. His film Ghosts and Gravel Roads was recognized as one of Canada’s Top Ten Shorts of 2008 by the Toronto International Film Group and received the Mikeldi Silver Documentary Award at the 50th Edition of the International Festival of Documentary and Short Film of Bilbao. Mike Rollo is also a founding member of the Double Negative Film Collective, a Montreal-based group of film, video and installation artists interested in creating, curating and disseminating experimental film and video. Mike teaches film production at the University of Regina.

The Handeye (Bone Ghosts)

Handeye
Director: Juan David González Monroy & Anja Dornieden | Austria | Experimental | 7 minutes

In early 20th century Vienna Robert Musil invited Sigmund Freud to partake in, what he called, “a very special séance”. Seated at the table Musil revealed that they were going to summon the ghost of Frans Anton Mesmer, discoverer of animal magnetism and forefather of hypnosis. Musil told Freud about a series of dreams he had which involved a talking flea. Musil, who had secretly become a follower of the imaginationist school of animal magnetism wanted to question Mesmer as to the meaning of these dreams, in which said flea foretold of impending catastrophes all over Europe. It is said that Mesmer obligingly appeared and spoke in a repetitive and oblique manner. Mesmer’s words were transcribed by Freud in several scraps of paper and hidden separately in a series of objects that, owing to the vicissitudes of history, would end up in the collections of three Viennese museums. Legend has it that he who could piece together the text would find instructions for the assembly of a film. We visited these museums and, unable to break away the objects from their glass prisons, have made an attempt to reconstruct the film, hoping that the magnetic force inside the objects would transfer to the film’s silver halide crystals, allowing us to make sense of the single written testimony left over from the séance. In her diary as the lone entry for that date, Eugenie Schwarzwald, the only other known participant wrote: “A distinguished flea hypnotizes the ghost of a distinguished man.”
About the directors: Anja Dornieden and Juan David González Monroy are filmmakers who live and work in Berlin. They met in New York where they both received graduate degrees in Media Studies from The New School University. Since 2010 they have been working together under the moniker OJOBOCA. Their work encompasses films, performances, installations and workshops. They have presented their work internationally in a variety of festivals, galleries and museums. They are currently members of the artist-run film lab LaborBerlin.

The Yellow Ghost

yellow ghost
Director: Guillaume Vallée | Canada/Quebec | Experimental | 3 minutes

Director’s note: Based on a Recurrent nightmare from my childhood, usually ending in night terror A yellow specter riding a horse, the filmstrip being destroyed by multiple expositions with a flashlight, hand-processing and a heavy noise soundtrack composed by Eric Gingras. Camera less film

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King Curling (King Curling) @ Film House
Oct 18 @ 3:00 pm

Director: Ole Endresen
Norway | 2013 | Fiction | Norwegian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 90 minutes
Film source: Films Boutique
Sponsors: Eyes On The World 

King Curling (King Curling)

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King Curling is nothing less than The Big Lebowski of curling movies. If that’s not enough to intrigue you, consider that it’s also full of deadpan humor, pill-popping weirdos, and heavyset, gaudily attired Norwegians with emotional problems. A riot of color, comedy, and, yes, curling, King Curling slots itself neatly into the tradition of sports comedies about ne’er-do-well misfits (The Bad News Bears and Kingpin come to mind) who band together – in as awkward and bizarre a manner as possible – to win The Big Game. In this case, that game is the championship of curling, a sport often mocked tepidly in late-night monologues around Winter Olympics time, but the film, as a kind of bonus feature, reveals it to be more complex and entertaining than it appears. The inherent ridiculousness of the sport – ice brooms, really? – rests knowingly at the heart of this fun, outsized comedy that will have you laughing out loud and rooting for the underdog misfit loser oddball emotionally maladjusted gang of bizarro curlers.

Oct
19
Sat
Magnetic Reconnection @ ECHO
Oct 19 @ 11:00 am
Director: Kyle Armstrong
Canada | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 6 minutes
Note: Playing with It’s Such a Beautiful Day

Magnetic-Reconnection

Contrasting the northern lights of Canada’s north with the harsh landscapes and decaying manmade debris littered around Churchill Manitoba.

Laurence Anyways @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 19 @ 12:00 pm

Director: Xavier Nolan
Canada | 2013 | Fiction | French w/English subtitles
Run Time: 161 minutes
Film source: Breaking Glass Pictures

Laurence Anyways

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Winner of several major festival awards, Laurence Anyways is the third film from Quebeçois enfant terrible Xavier Dolan, whose films I Killed My Mother (2009) and Heartbeats (2010) were both international sensations. Evoking Rainer Werner Fassbinder (via Douglas Sirk), Wong Kar Wai, and Pedro Almodóvar, Dolan, not yet 25, has created a rich brew of daring cinematic accomplishment. A love story rendered impossible by the fluid nature of sexuality and identity, Laurence Anyways takes us through the many-gendered permutations of the romance of Laurence and Frédérique (Suzanne Clément, winner of the Un Certain Regard award for her performance at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival). Laurence, living as a man, reveals to his lover Frédérique that his life has been a lie, and that to be true to himself, he must live as a woman. Unsurprisingly, this revelation changes the nature of the couple’s romance, but not in ways that either of them would ever have expected. Bold, ambitious, and frank, Laurence Anyways is a challenging statement about gender, love, and human nature.

Awards

Best Canadian Feature film; Suzanne Clément – best Actress

The End of Time @ ECHO
Oct 19 @ 12:30 pm
Director: Peter Mettler
Canada | Experimental
Run Time: 114 minutes
Film source: First Run Features

The End of Time

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Canadian-Swiss filmmaker and photographer Peter Mettler’s stunning and provocative films combine elements of documentary, essay, and experimental cinema. The End of Time is a peripatetic exploration that challenges our conception of time, and perhaps the very fabric of our existence. With brilliant photography and a knack for capturing astonishing moments, The End of Time journeys from the CERN particle accelerator near Geneva to the lava flows in Hawaii that have overtaken all but one home on the south side of the Big Island; from the disintegration of inner-city Detroit to a Hindu funeral rite near the place of Buddha’s enlightenment to a transcendent final section that simply must be seen on the big screen.” Imagine Science Film Festival. Mettler is in the forefront of a new genre that involves mixing images much the way deejays mix sounds and beats, dissolving multiple frames to create fresh, unified designs; but in his case, it is with the purpose of asking big questions and making connections between the infinitesimally small and imponderably vast.

Ô Divin Bovin (Oh Divine Bovine) @ Film House
Oct 19 @ 5:00 pm

Director: Alexandre Rufin
Canada/Quebec | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 6 minutes
Short: Playing with Meat Hooked! .

O-divin-bovin

Just an ordinary day in the life of a farmer: birth/death of a calf.