Calendar

Oct
13
Sun
The Fatwa: Salman’s Story @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 3:15 pm
Director: Alan Yentob
UK | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 81 minutes
Film source: Jill Nichols
Additional info: US Premiere
Introduction by: Mark Pendergrast 

The Fatwa: Salman's Story

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Rushdie’s 1988 book The Satanic Verses, inspired in part by the life of the Muslim prophet Muhammad, was seen as blasphemous by some conservative Muslims and prompted the former spiritual leader of Iran to condemn Rushdie to death. This fascinating BBC film takes us through many of the events described in Salman Rushdie’s latest book – Joseph Anton: A Memoir. Between the narration taken straight from the language of the book, are interviews, news clips, images, and contemporary footage of the places featured in Rushdie’s story. The overall effect is the sense of traveling along with Rushdie through his story from the first moment he heard about the fatwa to his eventual freedom from police protection and the Iranian government’s death threat. We are reminded of the circumstances surrounding the publication of The Satanic Verses, including film clips showing the riots which took place in response to the book and the book burning. Rushdie is fascinating about the role of writers in society: “An attack upon our ability to tell stories is not just censorship — it is a crime against our nature as human beings”.

Hot Water @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Lizabeth Rogers & Kevin Flint
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker
Also: Q&A with Lizabeth Rogers, moderated by Bill Stetson 

Hot Water

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Hot Water tells the story of the contamination that runs through our air, soil and, even more dramatically, our water. Despite messages from older films, such as Fat Man and Little Boy and Duck and Cover, which led us to believe it was safe to eat, drink and breathe in the shadow of the atomic bomb, the reality is that our ground water, air and soil are contaminated with some of the most toxic heavy metals on the planet. The filmmakers begin in South Dakota witnessing communities overwhelmed by cancer from what they described as constant exposure to uranium from local mining interests. They then follow the story to Oklahoma to explain the economic model of the industry. Interviews with leading scientists and environmentalist such as Dennis Kucinich are interspersed with personal insights: “I took this journey because I was pissed off. I felt like an idiot because I believed the lies. I believed we were safe. I made this film because people need to know the truth.” – Lizabeth Rogers

Oct
14
Mon
Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters @ ECHO
Oct 14 @ 1:30 pm
Director: Ben Shapiro
USA | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 77 minutes
Film source: Zeitgeist Films
Sponsor: Judy Gerber & Dan Higgins
Introduction by: Dan Higgins 

Gregory Crewdson

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A fascinating portrait of one of the most compelling, mysterious and theatrical photographers of our time. Gregory Crewdson’s photographs are elaborately staged, elegant narratives compressed into a single, albeit large-scale image, many of them taken at twilight, set in small towns of Western Massachusetts or meticulously recreated interior spaces, built on the kind of sound stages associated with big-budget movies. Shapiro’s fascinating profile of this acclaimed artist at work includes stories of his Park Slope childhood (in which he tried to overhear patients of his psychologist father), his summers in the bucolic countryside (which he now imbues with a sense of dread and foreboding), and his encounter with Diane Arbus’s work in 1972 at age 10. Novelists Rick Moody and Russell Banks, and fellow photographer Laurie Simmons, comment on the motivation behind their friend’s haunting images.

A River Changes Course @ Film House
Oct 14 @ 5:45 pm

Director: Kalyanee Mam
Cambodia/USA | 2013 | Documentary | Cambodian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 83 minutes
Film source: The Film Collaborative

A River Changes Course

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This mesmerizing film, in a refreshing departure from polemical envrionmental films, follows three Cambodian families – one living in a floating hut on the Tonlé Sap river, one dwelling deep in the jungle, and one whose daughter moves to Phnom Penh to work in a garment factory – as their world is transformed by forces beyond their power to control or understand. The cinematography and pacing gently transport us into their lives.

Director’s statement: ”My approach to documentary filmmaking has been to tell the human story rather than the politcal one [...] Filmmaking is about asking the right questions, not finding solutions and for me the best way to do this is to explore the lives of people and allow them to tell their own stories. The experts for me are the people themselves. When people in Cambodia view this film, it’s often their first opportunity to travel to different parts of the country. Those who live on the lake have never seen the jungle before. The people in the jungle have never seen people working in a factory. So this is really their first opportunity to see their country — how beautiful it is, how precious it is, and how important it is to preserve and protect that beauty”. Adapted from an interview in the Huffington Post.

AWARDS

World Cinema Grand Jury Prize-Best Documentary - Sundance 2013
Golden Gate Award-Best Documentary Feature – SFIFF

Bottled Life @ ECHO
Oct 14 @ 6:30 pm
Director: Urs Schnell
Switzerland | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 90 minutes
Film source: Rise and Shine
Sponsor: VT Council on World Affairs

Bottled Life, Nestle

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Do you know how to turn ordinary water into a billion-dollar business? In Switzerland there’s a company which has developed the art to perfection – Nestlé. This company dominates the global business in bottled water. Swiss journalist Res Gehringer has investigated this money-making phenomena. Nestlé refused to cooperate, on the pretext that it was “the wrong film at the wrong time”. So Gehringer went on a journey of exploration, researching the story in the USA, Nigeria and Pakistan. His journey into the world of bottled water provides insight into the strategies of the most powerful food and beverage company in the world.

Awards

Winner: GreenMe Festival, Berlin

Presented

by
Jen Fleckenstein, Vermont Certified Class II Water Operator, Clear Water Filtration, and Board Member, Pure Water for the World, Inc.

Oct
15
Tue
Chihuly Outside @ ECHO
Oct 15 @ 1:30 pm
Director: Peter West
USA | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 60 minutes
Film source: Chihuly Workshop
Presented by: Rich Arentzen of AO Glass

Chihuly Outside

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Chihuly Outside covers nearly half a century of Dale Chihuly’s epic outdoor installations. The film chronicles Chihuly’s first experiments with floating glass on water and using ice and neon, his early work at Art Park in Upstate New York and his decade-long exploration of large-scale installations at 12 of the world’s preeminent botanic gardens and conservatories. Among many highlights, the hour-long documentary traces the development of Mille Fiori, a 56-foot “garden of glass” first exhibited in 2008 at the DeYoung Museum in San Francisco, and his most recent work, Chihuly Garden and Glass, which opened May 2012 at the foot of Seattle’s iconic Space Needle. What emerges is a portrait of an innovative artist always seeking new ways to adapt his medium to natural spaces, propelled by a desire to move, provoke and inspire viewers. Chihuly Outside completes a trilogy of films exploring Chihuly’s work, which began in 2008 with Chihuly in the Hotshop and continued with 2010′s Chihuly Fire & Light.

Oct
16
Wed
The Fatwa: Salman’s Story @ ECHO
Oct 16 @ 3:30 pm
Director: Alan Yentob
UK | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 81 minutes
Film source: Jill Nichols
Additional info: US Premiere

The Fatwa: Salman's Story

GET TICKETS
Rushdie’s 1988 book The Satanic Verses, inspired in part by the life of the Muslim prophet Muhammad, was seen as blasphemous by some conservative Muslims and prompted the former spiritual leader of Iran to condemn Rushdie to death. This fascinating BBC film takes us through many of the events described in Salman Rushdie’s latest book – Joseph Anton: A Memoir. Between the narration taken straight from the language of the book, are interviews, news clips, images, and contemporary footage of the places featured in Rushdie’s story. The overall effect is the sense of traveling along with Rushdie through his story from the first moment he heard about the fatwa to his eventual freedom from police protection and the Iranian government’s death threat. We are reminded of the circumstances surrounding the publication of The Satanic Verses, including film clips showing the riots which took place in response to the book and the book burning. Rushdie is fascinating about the role of writers in society: “An attack upon our ability to tell stories is not just censorship — it is a crime against our nature as human beings”.

Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters @ ECHO
Oct 16 @ 6:30 pm
Director: Ben Shapiro
USA | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 77 minutes
Film source: Zeitgeist Films
Sponsor: Judy Gerber & Dan Higgins
Introduction by: Dan Higgins 

Gregory Crewdson

GET TICKETS
A fascinating portrait of one of the most compelling, mysterious and theatrical photographers of our time. Gregory Crewdson’s photographs are elaborately staged, elegant narratives compressed into a single, albeit large-scale image, many of them taken at twilight, set in small towns of Western Massachusetts or meticulously recreated interior spaces, built on the kind of sound stages associated with big-budget movies. Shapiro’s fascinating profile of this acclaimed artist at work includes stories of his Park Slope childhood (in which he tried to overhear patients of his psychologist father), his summers in the bucolic countryside (which he now imbues with a sense of dread and foreboding), and his encounter with Diane Arbus’s work in 1972 at age 10. Novelists Rick Moody and Russell Banks, and fellow photographer Laurie Simmons, comment on the motivation behind their friend’s haunting images.

Oct
17
Thu
Bottled Life @ ECHO
Oct 17 @ 3:30 pm
Director: Urs Schnell
Switzerland | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 90 minutes
Film source: Rise and Shine
Sponsor: VT Council on World Affairs

Bottled Life, Nestle

GET TICKETS
Do you know how to turn ordinary water into a billion-dollar business? In Switzerland there’s a company which has developed the art to perfection – Nestlé. This company dominates the global business in bottled water. Swiss journalist Res Gehringer has investigated this money-making phenomena. Nestlé refused to cooperate, on the pretext that it was “the wrong film at the wrong time”. So Gehringer went on a journey of exploration, researching the story in the USA, Nigeria and Pakistan. His journey into the world of bottled water provides insight into the strategies of the most powerful food and beverage company in the world.

Awards

Winner: GreenMe Festival, Berlin

Presented

by
Jen Fleckenstein, Vermont Certified Class II Water Operator, Clear Water Filtration, and Board Member, Pure Water for the World, Inc.

Chihuly Outside @ ECHO
Oct 17 @ 6:30 pm
Director: Peter West
USA | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 60 minutes
Film source: Chihuly Workshop
Presented by: Rich Arentzen of AO Glass

Chihuly Outside

GET TICKETS
Chihuly Outside covers nearly half a century of Dale Chihuly’s epic outdoor installations. The film chronicles Chihuly’s first experiments with floating glass on water and using ice and neon, his early work at Art Park in Upstate New York and his decade-long exploration of large-scale installations at 12 of the world’s preeminent botanic gardens and conservatories. Among many highlights, the hour-long documentary traces the development of Mille Fiori, a 56-foot “garden of glass” first exhibited in 2008 at the DeYoung Museum in San Francisco, and his most recent work, Chihuly Garden and Glass, which opened May 2012 at the foot of Seattle’s iconic Space Needle. What emerges is a portrait of an innovative artist always seeking new ways to adapt his medium to natural spaces, propelled by a desire to move, provoke and inspire viewers. Chihuly Outside completes a trilogy of films exploring Chihuly’s work, which began in 2008 with Chihuly in the Hotshop and continued with 2010′s Chihuly Fire & Light.

Oct
18
Fri
Hot Water @ ECHO
Oct 18 @ 1:30 pm

Director: Lizabeth Rogers & Kevin Flint
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker

Hot Water

GET TICKETS
Hot Water tells the story of the contamination that runs through our air, soil and, even more dramatically, our water. Despite messages from older films, such as Fat Man and Little Boy and Duck and Cover, which led us to believe it was safe to eat, drink and breathe in the shadow of the atomic bomb, the reality is that our ground water, air and soil are contaminated with some of the most toxic heavy metals on the planet. The filmmakers begin in South Dakota witnessing communities overwhelmed by cancer from what they described as constant exposure to uranium from local mining interests. They then follow the story to Oklahoma to explain the economic model of the industry. Interviews with leading scientists and environmentalist such as Dennis Kucinich are interspersed with personal insights: “I took this journey because I was pissed off. I felt like an idiot because I believed the lies. I believed we were safe. I made this film because people need to know the truth.” – Lizabeth Rogers

A River Changes Course @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 18 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Kalyanee Mam
Cambodia/USA | 2013 | Documentary | Cambodian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 83 minutes
Film source: The Film Collaborative

GET TICKETS
This mesmerizing film, in a refreshing departure from polemical envrionmental films, follows three Cambodian families – one living in a floating hut on the Tonlé Sap river, one dwelling deep in the jungle, and one whose daughter moves to Phnom Penh to work in a garment factory – as their world is transformed by forces beyond their power to control or understand. The cinematography and pacing gently transport us into their lives.

River-Changes-Course

Director’s statement: ”My approach to documentary filmmaking has been to tell the human story rather than the politcal one [...] Filmmaking is about asking the right questions, not finding solutions and for me the best way to do this is to explore the lives of people and allow them to tell their own stories. The experts for me are the people themselves. When people in Cambodia view this film, it’s often their first opportunity to travel to different parts of the country. Those who live on the lake have never seen the jungle before. The people in the jungle have never seen people working in a factory. So this is really their first opportunity to see their country — how beautiful it is, how precious it is, and how important it is to preserve and protect that beauty”. Adapted from an interview in the Huffington Post.

AWARDS

World Cinema Grand Jury Prize-Best Documentary - Sundance 2013
Golden Gate Award-Best Documentary Feature – SFIFF

Oct
19
Sat
Michael H. Profession: Director @ Film House
Oct 19 @ 2:30 pm

Director: Yves Montmayeur
Austri, France | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 92 minutes
Film source: Films Boutique/box]

Michael H Profession Filmmaker

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Over the past two-and-a-half decades, director Michael Haneke has established himself as a towering figure in modern cinema with his uniquely controversial and challenging films that have polarized audiences and critics alike for decades. Such works as Funny Games (1997 and 2007: he remade his own film), The Piano Teacher (2001), the mysterious Caché (2005), and last year’s Oscar-winning Amour explore both the dark and the loving sides of human existence – often at the same time, and almost always in unforgettable ways. Now, Yves Montmayeur, who has made the “making-of” documentaries for most of Haneke’s films, turns his lens on Haneke himself, unravelling a working method that reveals a great deal about the man. As much a meditation on the nature of film as any of Haneke’s works themselves, Michael H: Profession Filmmaker uses interviews with Haneke’s creative collaborators as well as re-contextualized footage from his films. The documentary finds a compelling tension between the warmth of the man and the horrors in his films, and is a fascinating portrait of one of the most important filmmakers of our day.

Leviathan @ ECHO
Oct 19 @ 2:45 pm
Director: Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Verena Paravel
France | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 87 minutes
Film source: Chihuly Workshop
Sponsor: VT Energy Investment Corporation=

Leviathan

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A groundbreaking, immersive portrait of the contemporary commercial fishing industry. Filmed off the coast of New Bedford, Massachusetts, Leviathan follows a hulking groundfish trawler, into the surrounding murky black waters on a weeks-long fishing expedition. But instead of romanticizing the labor or partaking in the longstanding tradition of turning fisherfolk into images, the filmmakers present a vivid, almost-kaleidoscopic representation of players, both human and marine. Employing an arsenal of cameras that passed freely from film crew to ship crew; that swoop from below sea level to astonishing bird’s-eye views, the film that emerges is unlike anything that has been seen before. Entirely dialogue-free, but mesmerizing and gripping throughout, it is a cosmic portrait of one of mankind’s oldest endeavors..

About the Directors: Véréna Paravel and Lucien Castaing-Taylor are filmmakers, artists, and anthropologists, who work at the Sensory Ethnography Lab at Harvard University. Their work is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art (NY) and the British Museum, and has been screened at the AFI, BAFICI, Berlin, CPH:DOX, Locarno, NewYork, Toronto, and Viennale film festivals, and exhibited at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts, the Centre Pompidou, the Berlin Kunsthalle, and elsewhere.

Awards

Sevilla International Film Festival – Non-Fiction Eurodoc Award
Belfort International Film Festival – Grand Jury Award
Locarno International Film Festival – Fipresci jury award

Brothers Hypnotic @ Film House
Oct 19 @ 7:00 pm

Director: Reuben Atlas
USA, Netherlands | 2013 | Documentary | English
Run Time: 85 minutes
Film source: Reuben Atlas
Sponsor: Duncan Wisniewski Architecture 

Brothers Hypnotic

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Note: Tickets include the live performance at 10PM at Signal Kitchen. One ticket gets you in to both.
The eight brothers in the Hypnotic Brass Ensemble are all sons of anti-establishment jazz legend, Phil Cohran. Raised together on Chicago’s South Side on a diet of jazz, funk and Black Consciousness, the brothers play inthe streets of NYC, collaborate with Mos Def or wow people at jazz festivals. The film constructs their coming of age story with wonderful camera work and hugely enjoyable music scenes.

GALA SCREENING

Screening followed by Gala party at Signal Kitchen (8:45PM) and live performance by the Hypnotic Ensemble. More info… sponsored by Signal Kitchen, John Douglas & Bob Summers. Ticket to film includes free access to the party an  live concert.