Calendar

Oct
13
Sun
The Fatwa: Salman’s Story @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 3:15 pm
Director: Alan Yentob
UK | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 81 minutes
Film source: Jill Nichols
Additional info: US Premiere
Introduction by: Mark Pendergrast 

The Fatwa: Salman's Story

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Rushdie’s 1988 book The Satanic Verses, inspired in part by the life of the Muslim prophet Muhammad, was seen as blasphemous by some conservative Muslims and prompted the former spiritual leader of Iran to condemn Rushdie to death. This fascinating BBC film takes us through many of the events described in Salman Rushdie’s latest book – Joseph Anton: A Memoir. Between the narration taken straight from the language of the book, are interviews, news clips, images, and contemporary footage of the places featured in Rushdie’s story. The overall effect is the sense of traveling along with Rushdie through his story from the first moment he heard about the fatwa to his eventual freedom from police protection and the Iranian government’s death threat. We are reminded of the circumstances surrounding the publication of The Satanic Verses, including film clips showing the riots which took place in response to the book and the book burning. Rushdie is fascinating about the role of writers in society: “An attack upon our ability to tell stories is not just censorship — it is a crime against our nature as human beings”.

Hot Water @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Lizabeth Rogers & Kevin Flint
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker
Also: Q&A with Lizabeth Rogers, moderated by Bill Stetson 

Hot Water

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Hot Water tells the story of the contamination that runs through our air, soil and, even more dramatically, our water. Despite messages from older films, such as Fat Man and Little Boy and Duck and Cover, which led us to believe it was safe to eat, drink and breathe in the shadow of the atomic bomb, the reality is that our ground water, air and soil are contaminated with some of the most toxic heavy metals on the planet. The filmmakers begin in South Dakota witnessing communities overwhelmed by cancer from what they described as constant exposure to uranium from local mining interests. They then follow the story to Oklahoma to explain the economic model of the industry. Interviews with leading scientists and environmentalist such as Dennis Kucinich are interspersed with personal insights: “I took this journey because I was pissed off. I felt like an idiot because I believed the lies. I believed we were safe. I made this film because people need to know the truth.” – Lizabeth Rogers

White Rock @ Film House
Oct 13 @ 6:45 pm
Director: Tony Maylem
UK | 1977 | Documentary
Run Time: 80 minutes
Film source: IOC
Sponsor: Smugglers Notch Resort
Special Note: North American Premiere. Introduced by Adrian Wood.
Ticketing Note:TICKETS CANNOT BE PURCHASED ONLINE BUT ARE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT THE DOOR. This film is part of a triple bill with A Passion for Snow and the presentation: Restoring Olympic Films and includes a reception.

White Rock

TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT THE DOOR
Photograph © IOC. The Official Film of the Innsbruck 1976 Winter Olympics in a brand new restored version. Director’s Statement: “It is never easy to make a film on the Olympic Games that will theatrically engage audiences. By the time of its release most people have already seen the event on TV, so it has to deliver on a very different level than simple reportage. I concentrated on just a handful of chosen events rather than dissipate the focus across every sport and medal. The concept was to take the audience inside those winter sports—to feel the emotion and experience the dangers and majesty that the competitors felt. Rick Wakeman’s score added considerably to the visual and emotional experience. To bring the audience even closer to the action, James Coburn was brought in to act as “everyman,” helping the audience to identify, not only with the obvious dangers, but also with the competitors high levels of skill.” Shot in Panavision utilizing using vari-speed cameras with telephoto lenses up to 2000mm, White Rock was created to take the audience on a ride that was very different from the TV coverage. It resulted in an extensive worldwide theatrical release including the US, the UK and Japan.
The restoration: The film was digitally restored in 4K for the International Olympic Committee by Warner Bros. Motion Picture Imaging using the 35mm original anamorphic negative. The 4-track magnetic stereo sound was restored and re-mastered at Audio Mechanics in Burbank, CA.
TICKETS CANNOT BE PURCHASED ONLINE BUT ARE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT THE DOOR.

Oct
14
Mon
A River Changes Course @ Film House
Oct 14 @ 5:45 pm

Director: Kalyanee Mam
Cambodia/USA | 2013 | Documentary | Cambodian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 83 minutes
Film source: The Film Collaborative

A River Changes Course

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This mesmerizing film, in a refreshing departure from polemical envrionmental films, follows three Cambodian families – one living in a floating hut on the Tonlé Sap river, one dwelling deep in the jungle, and one whose daughter moves to Phnom Penh to work in a garment factory – as their world is transformed by forces beyond their power to control or understand. The cinematography and pacing gently transport us into their lives.

Director’s statement: “My approach to documentary filmmaking has been to tell the human story rather than the politcal one [...] Filmmaking is about asking the right questions, not finding solutions and for me the best way to do this is to explore the lives of people and allow them to tell their own stories. The experts for me are the people themselves. When people in Cambodia view this film, it’s often their first opportunity to travel to different parts of the country. Those who live on the lake have never seen the jungle before. The people in the jungle have never seen people working in a factory. So this is really their first opportunity to see their country — how beautiful it is, how precious it is, and how important it is to preserve and protect that beauty”. Adapted from an interview in the Huffington Post.

AWARDS

World Cinema Grand Jury Prize-Best Documentary - Sundance 2013
Golden Gate Award-Best Documentary Feature – SFIFF

Bottled Life @ ECHO
Oct 14 @ 6:30 pm
Director: Urs Schnell
Switzerland | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 90 minutes
Film source: Rise and Shine
Sponsor: VT Council on World Affairs

Bottled Life, Nestle

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Do you know how to turn ordinary water into a billion-dollar business? In Switzerland there’s a company which has developed the art to perfection – Nestlé. This company dominates the global business in bottled water. Swiss journalist Res Gehringer has investigated this money-making phenomena. Nestlé refused to cooperate, on the pretext that it was “the wrong film at the wrong time”. So Gehringer went on a journey of exploration, researching the story in the USA, Nigeria and Pakistan. His journey into the world of bottled water provides insight into the strategies of the most powerful food and beverage company in the world.

Awards

Winner: GreenMe Festival, Berlin

Presented

by
Jen Fleckenstein, Vermont Certified Class II Water Operator, Clear Water Filtration, and Board Member, Pure Water for the World, Inc.

Act of Killing @ Film House
Oct 14 @ 7:30 pm

Director: Joshua Oppenheimer
Denmark/Norway/UK | 2013 | Documentary | Indonesian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 120 minutes
Film source: Drafthouse Films
Sponsors: Planet Hardwood & Burlington College

Act of Killing

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You have never seen a film like this one. Director Joshua Oppenheimer interviews the leaders of Indonesian death squads, who were collectively responsible for the deaths of millions of Communists, leftists and ethnic Chinese in 1965 and 1966. But he doesn’t just interview them. As the ambiguous title of the film suggests, he lets them re-enact their crimes and even invites them to write, perform and film skits dramatizing their murders in the style of the American movies they love. This film is about the power of moviemaking and storytelling, sometimes cathartic, sometimes destructive, always illuminating. And, incredibly, you will also find yourself laughing occasionally.

Q&A with director via skype.
Director’s statement:
 The film is fundamentally about how we as human beings use storytelling to create our reality, to justify our actions, and to cope, or to escape from even our most bitter and painful truths. We can commit any kind of crime if we have a story to justify it.

AWARDS

Audience Award – Berlin Film Festival

Oct
15
Tue
Lunchtime Shorts: Reality? @ BCA
Oct 15 @ 12:00 pm

A program of some of the most interesting and varied international documentary shorts.
Your ticket includes lunch. Come up to the Loraine B Goode room on the 2nd floor of BCA, grab your sandwich and drink, sit down and watch the films.

The Lunchtime Shorts Series is sponsored in part by Middlebury College

Program curated by: Orly Yadin

No Ordinary Passenger

Director: Cabell Hopkins
UK | 2012 | Documentary | 8 minutes

Noordinarypassenger_WEB

86 years old and positively fearless, Stan Dibben recalls his hair-raising, tarmac-skimming career as a World Champion passenger.

Coffee Time

Director: Maria Fredriksson
Sweden | 2011 | Documentary
Run Time: 14 minutes

Coffee Time

A quartet of proper Swedish ladies of a certain age get together for a coffee klatch; they nibble on sweet cakes, sip from fine china and discuss all the usual things: viagra, cock rings and orgasms. Just like your grandmother used to do.

The Stitches Speak

Director: Nina Sabnani
India | 2011 | Documentary | 10 minutes
Sponsor: Documentary Educational Resources

Stitches-Speak

After

Director: Lukasz Konopa
UK | 2011 | Documentary | 7 minutes
Playing in the program Lunchtime Shorts: Reality?

After, Lukasz Konopa

Film about contemporary life in Auschwitz. In an observation from dusk to dawn, it portrays the theatre of everyday life around the grim confines of this former concentration camp.

Americanized

Director: Abhi Singh
USA | 2013 | Documentary | 4 minutes

Americanized

Irish Folk Furniture

Director: Tony Donoghue
Ireland | 2012 | Documentary | 8 minutes

IrishFolkFurniture

A animation film that explores a local craftsman’s restoration of a rural piece of furniture in a small Irish community.

Abuelas (The Grandmothers)

Director: Afarin Eghbal
UK | 2011 | Documentary | 9 minutes

Abuelas

In a small apartment in Buenos Aires a grandmother (abuela) is surrounded by reminders of the tragedy that befell her family during Argentina’s military dictatorship. Using real life testimonials from the Grandmothers of May Square the films is a testament to the tenacity of the women who conitinue to fight for the truth about their missing relatives.

The Bubbleologist

Director: Jan Bednarz
UK | 2012 | Documentary | 6 minutes

Bubbleologist

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Oct
16
Wed
Lunchtime Shorts: Animated @ BCA
Oct 16 @ 12:00 pm

A selection of award-winning international animated films.

The Lunchtime Shorts Series is sponsored in part by Middlebury College

Your ticket includes lunch. Come up to the Loraine B Goode room on the 2nd floor of BCA, grab your sandwich and drink, sit down and watch the films.

Curated by Orly Yadin

When One Stops

When-One-Stops

Director: Jenni Rahkonen
Finland | Fiction | Animation | 7 minutes

The world won’t stop turning even when one stops turning with it.

 

Gates of Life

Gates Of Life

Director: Hannes Vartiainen, Pekka Veikkolainen
Finland | Fiction | Animation | 6 minutes

Brief moments of life stolen from passing-by strangers form a sequence of events hidden in plain sight.

 

Oh Willy…

Oh WIlly

Director: Emma de Swaef & Marc James Roels
Belgium | Fiction | Animation | 17 minutes

Forced to return to his naturist roots, Willy bungles his way into noble savagery.

 

Damned

Damned

Director: Richard Phelan
UK | Fiction | Animation | 9 minutes

An over-ambitious beaver goes too far when he gets the chance to realize his ultimate dream.

 

Miss Todd

Miss Todd

Director: Kristina Yee
UK | Fiction | Animation | 13 minutes

The story of one young woman who dreams of flight in 1909, just as the whole of mankind is learning how to fly. Her passion is tireless, but in this era, she has more than gravity holding her down.

Awards:  Student Academy Awards – Gold Medal

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The Fatwa: Salman’s Story @ ECHO
Oct 16 @ 3:30 pm
Director: Alan Yentob
UK | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 81 minutes
Film source: Jill Nichols
Additional info: US Premiere

The Fatwa: Salman's Story

GET TICKETS
Rushdie’s 1988 book The Satanic Verses, inspired in part by the life of the Muslim prophet Muhammad, was seen as blasphemous by some conservative Muslims and prompted the former spiritual leader of Iran to condemn Rushdie to death. This fascinating BBC film takes us through many of the events described in Salman Rushdie’s latest book – Joseph Anton: A Memoir. Between the narration taken straight from the language of the book, are interviews, news clips, images, and contemporary footage of the places featured in Rushdie’s story. The overall effect is the sense of traveling along with Rushdie through his story from the first moment he heard about the fatwa to his eventual freedom from police protection and the Iranian government’s death threat. We are reminded of the circumstances surrounding the publication of The Satanic Verses, including film clips showing the riots which took place in response to the book and the book burning. Rushdie is fascinating about the role of writers in society: “An attack upon our ability to tell stories is not just censorship — it is a crime against our nature as human beings”.

Oct
17
Thu
Lunchtime Shorts: Fictions? @ BCA
Oct 17 @ 12:00 pm

4 short fiction films from 4 continents.
Your ticket includes lunch. Come up to the Loraine B Goode room on the 2nd floor of BCA, grab your sandwich and drink, sit down and watch the films.

The Lunchtime Shorts Series is sponsored in part by Middlebury College

Program curated by: Orly Yadin

Cook Book

Directors: Martin Briggs-Watson & Andrew William Robb
USA | 2012 | Fiction | 11 minutes

Cook-Book_12

Shot without dialogue, Cook Book is a short comedy about the hazards of cooking a romantic meal.

La Hija (The Daughter)

Director: Jazmin Rada
Spain, Argentina | 2012 | Fiction | Spanish w/English subtitles | 5 minutes

LA HIJA_THE DAUGHTER_ STILLS_ POSTER Higher-Res._ CONTACT INFO

Challenging her father’s excuses not to play, Fatima uses her imagination and special balloons.

Meathead

Directors: Sam Holst
New Zealand | 2013 | Fiction | 11 minutes

Meathead

Michael is a seventeen year-old kid who gets a job at the local meat works. The place is challenging and his fellow workers aren’t exactly welcoming of new blood. It soon becomes clear that this day isn’t going to be about just trying to fit in.

The Mass of Men

Director: Jan Bednarz
UK | 2013 | Fiction | 17 minutes

Mass-of-Men-still-4

Inspired by the events surrounding the London Riots in 2011 and the subsequent infamous speech made by Prime Minister David Cameron, The Mass of Men gives harsh insight into the dangers of repression, disillusionment and apathy.

GET TICKETS
Act of Killing @ ECHO
Oct 17 @ 1:00 pm

Director: Joshua Oppenheimer
Denmark/Norway/UK | 2013 | Documentary | Indonesian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 120 minutes
Film source: Drafthouse Films
Sponsors: Planet Hardwood & Burlington College

Act of Killing

GET TICKETS
You have never seen a film like this one. Director Joshua Oppenheimer interviews the leaders of Indonesian death squads, who were collectively responsible for the deaths of millions of Communists, leftists and ethnic Chinese in 1965 and 1966. But he doesn’t just interview them. As the ambiguous title of the film suggests, he lets them re-enact their crimes and even invites them to write, perform and film skits dramatizing their murders in the style of the American movies they love. This film is about the power of moviemaking and storytelling, sometimes cathartic, sometimes destructive, always illuminating. And, incredibly, you will also find yourself laughing occasionally.

Director’s statement: The film is fundamentally about how we as human beings use storytelling to create our reality, to justify our actions, and to cope, or to escape from even our most bitter and painful truths. We can commit any kind of crime if we have a story to justify it.

AWARDS

Audience Award – Berlin Film Festival

Bottled Life @ ECHO
Oct 17 @ 3:30 pm
Director: Urs Schnell
Switzerland | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 90 minutes
Film source: Rise and Shine
Sponsor: VT Council on World Affairs

Bottled Life, Nestle

GET TICKETS
Do you know how to turn ordinary water into a billion-dollar business? In Switzerland there’s a company which has developed the art to perfection – Nestlé. This company dominates the global business in bottled water. Swiss journalist Res Gehringer has investigated this money-making phenomena. Nestlé refused to cooperate, on the pretext that it was “the wrong film at the wrong time”. So Gehringer went on a journey of exploration, researching the story in the USA, Nigeria and Pakistan. His journey into the world of bottled water provides insight into the strategies of the most powerful food and beverage company in the world.

Awards

Winner: GreenMe Festival, Berlin

Presented

by
Jen Fleckenstein, Vermont Certified Class II Water Operator, Clear Water Filtration, and Board Member, Pure Water for the World, Inc.

Oct
18
Fri
Hot Water @ ECHO
Oct 18 @ 1:30 pm

Director: Lizabeth Rogers & Kevin Flint
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker

Hot Water

GET TICKETS
Hot Water tells the story of the contamination that runs through our air, soil and, even more dramatically, our water. Despite messages from older films, such as Fat Man and Little Boy and Duck and Cover, which led us to believe it was safe to eat, drink and breathe in the shadow of the atomic bomb, the reality is that our ground water, air and soil are contaminated with some of the most toxic heavy metals on the planet. The filmmakers begin in South Dakota witnessing communities overwhelmed by cancer from what they described as constant exposure to uranium from local mining interests. They then follow the story to Oklahoma to explain the economic model of the industry. Interviews with leading scientists and environmentalist such as Dennis Kucinich are interspersed with personal insights: “I took this journey because I was pissed off. I felt like an idiot because I believed the lies. I believed we were safe. I made this film because people need to know the truth.” – Lizabeth Rogers

A River Changes Course @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 18 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Kalyanee Mam
Cambodia/USA | 2013 | Documentary | Cambodian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 83 minutes
Film source: The Film Collaborative

GET TICKETS
This mesmerizing film, in a refreshing departure from polemical envrionmental films, follows three Cambodian families – one living in a floating hut on the Tonlé Sap river, one dwelling deep in the jungle, and one whose daughter moves to Phnom Penh to work in a garment factory – as their world is transformed by forces beyond their power to control or understand. The cinematography and pacing gently transport us into their lives.

River-Changes-Course

Director’s statement: “My approach to documentary filmmaking has been to tell the human story rather than the politcal one [...] Filmmaking is about asking the right questions, not finding solutions and for me the best way to do this is to explore the lives of people and allow them to tell their own stories. The experts for me are the people themselves. When people in Cambodia view this film, it’s often their first opportunity to travel to different parts of the country. Those who live on the lake have never seen the jungle before. The people in the jungle have never seen people working in a factory. So this is really their first opportunity to see their country — how beautiful it is, how precious it is, and how important it is to preserve and protect that beauty”. Adapted from an interview in the Huffington Post.

AWARDS

World Cinema Grand Jury Prize-Best Documentary - Sundance 2013
Golden Gate Award-Best Documentary Feature – SFIFF

Oct
19
Sat
Leviathan @ ECHO
Oct 19 @ 2:45 pm
Director: Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Verena Paravel
France | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 87 minutes
Film source: Chihuly Workshop
Sponsor: VT Energy Investment Corporation=

Leviathan

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A groundbreaking, immersive portrait of the contemporary commercial fishing industry. Filmed off the coast of New Bedford, Massachusetts, Leviathan follows a hulking groundfish trawler, into the surrounding murky black waters on a weeks-long fishing expedition. But instead of romanticizing the labor or partaking in the longstanding tradition of turning fisherfolk into images, the filmmakers present a vivid, almost-kaleidoscopic representation of players, both human and marine. Employing an arsenal of cameras that passed freely from film crew to ship crew; that swoop from below sea level to astonishing bird’s-eye views, the film that emerges is unlike anything that has been seen before. Entirely dialogue-free, but mesmerizing and gripping throughout, it is a cosmic portrait of one of mankind’s oldest endeavors..

About the Directors: Véréna Paravel and Lucien Castaing-Taylor are filmmakers, artists, and anthropologists, who work at the Sensory Ethnography Lab at Harvard University. Their work is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art (NY) and the British Museum, and has been screened at the AFI, BAFICI, Berlin, CPH:DOX, Locarno, NewYork, Toronto, and Viennale film festivals, and exhibited at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts, the Centre Pompidou, the Berlin Kunsthalle, and elsewhere.

Awards

Sevilla International Film Festival – Non-Fiction Eurodoc Award
Belfort International Film Festival – Grand Jury Award
Locarno International Film Festival – Fipresci jury award