Calendar

Oct
13
Sun
It’s Such a Beautiful Day @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 11:00 am
Director: Don Hertzfeldt
USA | 2013 | Fiction | Animation
Run Time: 62 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker 

It's Such a Beautiful Day

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Cult animator and Academy Award nominee Don Hertzfeldt has seamlessly combined his three short films about a troubled man named Bill (Everything will be OK (2006), I Am So Proud of You (2008), and It’s Such a Beautiful Day (2011), into a darkly comedic, beautiful new feature film, captured entirely in-camera on an antique 35mm animation stand. Built in the 1940s, it is one of the last surviving cameras of its kind still operating in America, and was indispensable in the creation of the films’ unique visual effects and experimental images. “The film turns into an astonishing epic of the human experience with mortality and the frailty of the flesh, rendered in the combination of Hertzfeldt’s primitive stick figures, flashes of real-world pictures and a jaw-dropping sound design” - Scott Renshaw, SLC Weekly

Magnetic Reconnection @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 11:00 am
Director: Kyle Armstrong
Canada | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 6 minutes
Note: Playing with It’s Such a Beautiful Day

Magnetic-Reconnection

Contrasting the northern lights of Canada’s north with the harsh landscapes and decaying manmade debris littered around Churchill Manitoba.

The Ridge (Pura Vida) @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 1:15 pm
Director: Pablo Irburu, Migueltxo Molina
Nepal, Spain | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 85 minutes
Film source: Dogwoof
Sponsor: Bobbie Lanahan
Special Note: US Premiere

The Ridge (Pura Vida)

GET TICKETS
This exciting and gorgeously photographed film will keep you at the edge of your seat. It tells the nail-biting and life-affirming story of a dangerous rescue mission in the Himalayan Mountains. The south wall of Mount Annapurna in the Nepalese Himalayas is known among climbers as the most dangerous climb in the world. To reach the mountain’s summit at over 8,000 meters above sea level, mountaineers have to traverse a seven-kilometer-long ridge at 7,500 meters – an impossible task, especially for “pure” climbers who brave the thin air without oxygen tanks. So when experienced Spanish climber Iñaki Ochoa de Olza falls seriously ill while crossing the ridge in 2008, his hopes are slim. After his climbing partner Horia Colibasanu sounds the alarm, 12 fellow climbers from all over the world (Switzerland, Kazakhstan, Russia and the United States) mount a highly dangerous rescue operation. We travel the world to let these 12 rescuers tell their stories in their home environments. Why would they risk their lives to reach these mountaintops? Whatever the result of the rescue will be, these 12 heroes show us that the human spirit is alive and well.

The Fatwa: Salman’s Story @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 3:15 pm
Director: Alan Yentob
UK | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 81 minutes
Film source: Jill Nichols
Additional info: US Premiere
Introduction by: Mark Pendergrast 

The Fatwa: Salman's Story

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Rushdie’s 1988 book The Satanic Verses, inspired in part by the life of the Muslim prophet Muhammad, was seen as blasphemous by some conservative Muslims and prompted the former spiritual leader of Iran to condemn Rushdie to death. This fascinating BBC film takes us through many of the events described in Salman Rushdie’s latest book – Joseph Anton: A Memoir. Between the narration taken straight from the language of the book, are interviews, news clips, images, and contemporary footage of the places featured in Rushdie’s story. The overall effect is the sense of traveling along with Rushdie through his story from the first moment he heard about the fatwa to his eventual freedom from police protection and the Iranian government’s death threat. We are reminded of the circumstances surrounding the publication of The Satanic Verses, including film clips showing the riots which took place in response to the book and the book burning. Rushdie is fascinating about the role of writers in society: “An attack upon our ability to tell stories is not just censorship — it is a crime against our nature as human beings”.

Hot Water @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Lizabeth Rogers & Kevin Flint
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker
Also: Q&A with Lizabeth Rogers, moderated by Bill Stetson 

Hot Water

GET TICKETS
Hot Water tells the story of the contamination that runs through our air, soil and, even more dramatically, our water. Despite messages from older films, such as Fat Man and Little Boy and Duck and Cover, which led us to believe it was safe to eat, drink and breathe in the shadow of the atomic bomb, the reality is that our ground water, air and soil are contaminated with some of the most toxic heavy metals on the planet. The filmmakers begin in South Dakota witnessing communities overwhelmed by cancer from what they described as constant exposure to uranium from local mining interests. They then follow the story to Oklahoma to explain the economic model of the industry. Interviews with leading scientists and environmentalist such as Dennis Kucinich are interspersed with personal insights: “I took this journey because I was pissed off. I felt like an idiot because I believed the lies. I believed we were safe. I made this film because people need to know the truth.” – Lizabeth Rogers

Oct
14
Mon
Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters @ ECHO
Oct 14 @ 1:30 pm
Director: Ben Shapiro
USA | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 77 minutes
Film source: Zeitgeist Films
Sponsor: Judy Gerber & Dan Higgins
Introduction by: Dan Higgins 

Gregory Crewdson

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A fascinating portrait of one of the most compelling, mysterious and theatrical photographers of our time. Gregory Crewdson’s photographs are elaborately staged, elegant narratives compressed into a single, albeit large-scale image, many of them taken at twilight, set in small towns of Western Massachusetts or meticulously recreated interior spaces, built on the kind of sound stages associated with big-budget movies. Shapiro’s fascinating profile of this acclaimed artist at work includes stories of his Park Slope childhood (in which he tried to overhear patients of his psychologist father), his summers in the bucolic countryside (which he now imbues with a sense of dread and foreboding), and his encounter with Diane Arbus’s work in 1972 at age 10. Novelists Rick Moody and Russell Banks, and fellow photographer Laurie Simmons, comment on the motivation behind their friend’s haunting images.

Red Obsession @ ECHO
Oct 14 @ 3:30 pm
Director: David Roach, Warwick Ross
Australia| 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 75 minutes
Film source: Film Buff
Sponsor: Pistou Restaurant 

Red Obsession

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One of the most beautiful films about wine in general, and Bordeaux and its magical product in particular. But the series of aerial shots in golden light that establish the Medoc’s important proximity to the water, the rich combination of soil and sunlight, and the extraordinary architecture of the chateaux built here in the past 300 years are not gratuitous eye candy. They enhance the dramatic arc and the rude awakening about 20 minutes in. The action shifts to Shanghai and Hong Kong, from the people who make and sell the wine to those who buy it. It becomes a rip-roaring documentary tale of power, greed, vanity and increasingly the bricks and mortar of its famous chateaux. China is Bordeaux’s biggest market but also home to the fastest growing wine industry in the world, leading to the tantalizing notion that Bordeaux’s biggest client is about to become its biggest competitor.

A River Changes Course @ Film House
Oct 14 @ 5:45 pm

Director: Kalyanee Mam
Cambodia/USA | 2013 | Documentary | Cambodian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 83 minutes
Film source: The Film Collaborative

A River Changes Course

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This mesmerizing film, in a refreshing departure from polemical envrionmental films, follows three Cambodian families – one living in a floating hut on the Tonlé Sap river, one dwelling deep in the jungle, and one whose daughter moves to Phnom Penh to work in a garment factory – as their world is transformed by forces beyond their power to control or understand. The cinematography and pacing gently transport us into their lives.

Director’s statement: “My approach to documentary filmmaking has been to tell the human story rather than the politcal one [...] Filmmaking is about asking the right questions, not finding solutions and for me the best way to do this is to explore the lives of people and allow them to tell their own stories. The experts for me are the people themselves. When people in Cambodia view this film, it’s often their first opportunity to travel to different parts of the country. Those who live on the lake have never seen the jungle before. The people in the jungle have never seen people working in a factory. So this is really their first opportunity to see their country — how beautiful it is, how precious it is, and how important it is to preserve and protect that beauty”. Adapted from an interview in the Huffington Post.

AWARDS

World Cinema Grand Jury Prize-Best Documentary - Sundance 2013
Golden Gate Award-Best Documentary Feature – SFIFF

Bottled Life @ ECHO
Oct 14 @ 6:30 pm
Director: Urs Schnell
Switzerland | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 90 minutes
Film source: Rise and Shine
Sponsor: VT Council on World Affairs

Bottled Life, Nestle

GET TICKETS
Do you know how to turn ordinary water into a billion-dollar business? In Switzerland there’s a company which has developed the art to perfection – Nestlé. This company dominates the global business in bottled water. Swiss journalist Res Gehringer has investigated this money-making phenomena. Nestlé refused to cooperate, on the pretext that it was “the wrong film at the wrong time”. So Gehringer went on a journey of exploration, researching the story in the USA, Nigeria and Pakistan. His journey into the world of bottled water provides insight into the strategies of the most powerful food and beverage company in the world.

Awards

Winner: GreenMe Festival, Berlin

Presented

by
Jen Fleckenstein, Vermont Certified Class II Water Operator, Clear Water Filtration, and Board Member, Pure Water for the World, Inc.

Oct
15
Tue
Chihuly Outside @ ECHO
Oct 15 @ 1:30 pm
Director: Peter West
USA | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 60 minutes
Film source: Chihuly Workshop
Presented by: Rich Arentzen of AO Glass

Chihuly Outside

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Chihuly Outside covers nearly half a century of Dale Chihuly’s epic outdoor installations. The film chronicles Chihuly’s first experiments with floating glass on water and using ice and neon, his early work at Art Park in Upstate New York and his decade-long exploration of large-scale installations at 12 of the world’s preeminent botanic gardens and conservatories. Among many highlights, the hour-long documentary traces the development of Mille Fiori, a 56-foot “garden of glass” first exhibited in 2008 at the DeYoung Museum in San Francisco, and his most recent work, Chihuly Garden and Glass, which opened May 2012 at the foot of Seattle’s iconic Space Needle. What emerges is a portrait of an innovative artist always seeking new ways to adapt his medium to natural spaces, propelled by a desire to move, provoke and inspire viewers. Chihuly Outside completes a trilogy of films exploring Chihuly’s work, which began in 2008 with Chihuly in the Hotshop and continued with 2010′s Chihuly Fire & Light.

Rising From The Ashes @ ECHO
Oct 15 @ 3:30 pm
Director: T. C. Johnstone
USA, Rwanda | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: First Run Features
Sponsor: Old Spokes Home

Rising From The Ashes

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Two worlds collide when cycling legend Jock Boyer moves to Rwanda, Africa to help a group of struggling genocide survivors pursue their dream of a national team. The young cyclists, whose horrendous personal experiences in the 1994 genocide are still fresh in their minds, are determined to train and learn how to be professional athletes. The film’s journey to the finale at the London 2012 Olympic games is rivetting. We become gradually privy to the boys’ personal traumas and root for them to achieve their new life’s dreams. Narrated (and executive produced) by Forest Whitaker

Make Hummus Not War @ ECHO
Oct 15 @ 6:30 pm
Director: Trevor Graham
Australia | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 77 minutes
Film source: Yarrabank Films
Sponsor Burlington-Bethlehem-Arad Sister City Program
Also: Hummus tasting at 5:45PM

Make Hummus Not War Director Trevor Graham

GET TICKETS
Can a regional love of hummus be a recipe for peace in the Middle East? One of the oldest-known prepared foods in human history, hummus is claimed by multiple Middle-Eastern nationalities. So when Trevor Graham, a self-described hummus tragic, learned of a Lebanese plan to sue Israel for acting as if it had proprietary rights over the dish, he was intrigued and hungry for more. With Israel, Lebanon and Palestine fighting over who “owns” the hummus heritage, Graham set off on a personal, culinary and humorous journey through the hummus bars and kitchens of Beirut, Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and New York. Along the way he encounters doyenne of Middle East cuisine, Claudia Roden, zealots, Jewish settlers, political activists, chick pea farmers, novelists and sheikhs.

Oct
16
Wed
The Ridge (Pura Vida) @ ECHO
Oct 16 @ 1:30 pm
Director: Pablo Irburu, Migueltxo Molina
Nepal, Spain | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 85 minutes
Film source: Dogwoof
Sponsor: Bobbie Lanahan
Special Note: US Premiere

The Ridge (Pura Vida)

GET TICKETS
This exciting and gorgeously photographed film will keep you at the edge of your seat. It tells the nail-biting and life-affirming story of a dangerous rescue mission in the Himalayan Mountains. The south wall of Mount Annapurna in the Nepalese Himalayas is known among climbers as the most dangerous climb in the world. To reach the mountain’s summit at over 8,000 meters above sea level, mountaineers have to traverse a seven-kilometer-long ridge at 7,500 meters – an impossible task, especially for “pure” climbers who brave the thin air without oxygen tanks. So when experienced Spanish climber Iñaki Ochoa de Olza falls seriously ill while crossing the ridge in 2008, his hopes are slim. After his climbing partner Horia Colibasanu sounds the alarm, 12 fellow climbers from all over the world (Switzerland, Kazakhstan, Russia and the United States) mount a highly dangerous rescue operation. We travel the world to let these 12 rescuers tell their stories in their home environments. Why would they risk their lives to reach these mountaintops? Whatever the result of the rescue will be, these 12 heroes show us that the human spirit is alive and well.

The Fatwa: Salman’s Story @ ECHO
Oct 16 @ 3:30 pm
Director: Alan Yentob
UK | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 81 minutes
Film source: Jill Nichols
Additional info: US Premiere

The Fatwa: Salman's Story

GET TICKETS
Rushdie’s 1988 book The Satanic Verses, inspired in part by the life of the Muslim prophet Muhammad, was seen as blasphemous by some conservative Muslims and prompted the former spiritual leader of Iran to condemn Rushdie to death. This fascinating BBC film takes us through many of the events described in Salman Rushdie’s latest book – Joseph Anton: A Memoir. Between the narration taken straight from the language of the book, are interviews, news clips, images, and contemporary footage of the places featured in Rushdie’s story. The overall effect is the sense of traveling along with Rushdie through his story from the first moment he heard about the fatwa to his eventual freedom from police protection and the Iranian government’s death threat. We are reminded of the circumstances surrounding the publication of The Satanic Verses, including film clips showing the riots which took place in response to the book and the book burning. Rushdie is fascinating about the role of writers in society: “An attack upon our ability to tell stories is not just censorship — it is a crime against our nature as human beings”.

Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters @ ECHO
Oct 16 @ 6:30 pm
Director: Ben Shapiro
USA | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 77 minutes
Film source: Zeitgeist Films
Sponsor: Judy Gerber & Dan Higgins
Introduction by: Dan Higgins 

Gregory Crewdson

GET TICKETS
A fascinating portrait of one of the most compelling, mysterious and theatrical photographers of our time. Gregory Crewdson’s photographs are elaborately staged, elegant narratives compressed into a single, albeit large-scale image, many of them taken at twilight, set in small towns of Western Massachusetts or meticulously recreated interior spaces, built on the kind of sound stages associated with big-budget movies. Shapiro’s fascinating profile of this acclaimed artist at work includes stories of his Park Slope childhood (in which he tried to overhear patients of his psychologist father), his summers in the bucolic countryside (which he now imbues with a sense of dread and foreboding), and his encounter with Diane Arbus’s work in 1972 at age 10. Novelists Rick Moody and Russell Banks, and fellow photographer Laurie Simmons, comment on the motivation behind their friend’s haunting images.

Oct
17
Thu
Act of Killing @ ECHO
Oct 17 @ 1:00 pm

Director: Joshua Oppenheimer
Denmark/Norway/UK | 2013 | Documentary | Indonesian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 120 minutes
Film source: Drafthouse Films
Sponsors: Planet Hardwood & Burlington College

Act of Killing

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You have never seen a film like this one. Director Joshua Oppenheimer interviews the leaders of Indonesian death squads, who were collectively responsible for the deaths of millions of Communists, leftists and ethnic Chinese in 1965 and 1966. But he doesn’t just interview them. As the ambiguous title of the film suggests, he lets them re-enact their crimes and even invites them to write, perform and film skits dramatizing their murders in the style of the American movies they love. This film is about the power of moviemaking and storytelling, sometimes cathartic, sometimes destructive, always illuminating. And, incredibly, you will also find yourself laughing occasionally.

Director’s statement: The film is fundamentally about how we as human beings use storytelling to create our reality, to justify our actions, and to cope, or to escape from even our most bitter and painful truths. We can commit any kind of crime if we have a story to justify it.

AWARDS

Audience Award – Berlin Film Festival

Bottled Life @ ECHO
Oct 17 @ 3:30 pm
Director: Urs Schnell
Switzerland | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 90 minutes
Film source: Rise and Shine
Sponsor: VT Council on World Affairs

Bottled Life, Nestle

GET TICKETS
Do you know how to turn ordinary water into a billion-dollar business? In Switzerland there’s a company which has developed the art to perfection – Nestlé. This company dominates the global business in bottled water. Swiss journalist Res Gehringer has investigated this money-making phenomena. Nestlé refused to cooperate, on the pretext that it was “the wrong film at the wrong time”. So Gehringer went on a journey of exploration, researching the story in the USA, Nigeria and Pakistan. His journey into the world of bottled water provides insight into the strategies of the most powerful food and beverage company in the world.

Awards

Winner: GreenMe Festival, Berlin

Presented

by
Jen Fleckenstein, Vermont Certified Class II Water Operator, Clear Water Filtration, and Board Member, Pure Water for the World, Inc.

Chihuly Outside @ ECHO
Oct 17 @ 6:30 pm
Director: Peter West
USA | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 60 minutes
Film source: Chihuly Workshop
Presented by: Rich Arentzen of AO Glass

Chihuly Outside

GET TICKETS
Chihuly Outside covers nearly half a century of Dale Chihuly’s epic outdoor installations. The film chronicles Chihuly’s first experiments with floating glass on water and using ice and neon, his early work at Art Park in Upstate New York and his decade-long exploration of large-scale installations at 12 of the world’s preeminent botanic gardens and conservatories. Among many highlights, the hour-long documentary traces the development of Mille Fiori, a 56-foot “garden of glass” first exhibited in 2008 at the DeYoung Museum in San Francisco, and his most recent work, Chihuly Garden and Glass, which opened May 2012 at the foot of Seattle’s iconic Space Needle. What emerges is a portrait of an innovative artist always seeking new ways to adapt his medium to natural spaces, propelled by a desire to move, provoke and inspire viewers. Chihuly Outside completes a trilogy of films exploring Chihuly’s work, which began in 2008 with Chihuly in the Hotshop and continued with 2010′s Chihuly Fire & Light.

Oct
18
Fri
Hot Water @ ECHO
Oct 18 @ 1:30 pm

Director: Lizabeth Rogers & Kevin Flint
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker

Hot Water

GET TICKETS
Hot Water tells the story of the contamination that runs through our air, soil and, even more dramatically, our water. Despite messages from older films, such as Fat Man and Little Boy and Duck and Cover, which led us to believe it was safe to eat, drink and breathe in the shadow of the atomic bomb, the reality is that our ground water, air and soil are contaminated with some of the most toxic heavy metals on the planet. The filmmakers begin in South Dakota witnessing communities overwhelmed by cancer from what they described as constant exposure to uranium from local mining interests. They then follow the story to Oklahoma to explain the economic model of the industry. Interviews with leading scientists and environmentalist such as Dennis Kucinich are interspersed with personal insights: “I took this journey because I was pissed off. I felt like an idiot because I believed the lies. I believed we were safe. I made this film because people need to know the truth.” – Lizabeth Rogers

A River Changes Course @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 18 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Kalyanee Mam
Cambodia/USA | 2013 | Documentary | Cambodian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 83 minutes
Film source: The Film Collaborative

GET TICKETS
This mesmerizing film, in a refreshing departure from polemical envrionmental films, follows three Cambodian families – one living in a floating hut on the Tonlé Sap river, one dwelling deep in the jungle, and one whose daughter moves to Phnom Penh to work in a garment factory – as their world is transformed by forces beyond their power to control or understand. The cinematography and pacing gently transport us into their lives.

River-Changes-Course

Director’s statement: “My approach to documentary filmmaking has been to tell the human story rather than the politcal one [...] Filmmaking is about asking the right questions, not finding solutions and for me the best way to do this is to explore the lives of people and allow them to tell their own stories. The experts for me are the people themselves. When people in Cambodia view this film, it’s often their first opportunity to travel to different parts of the country. Those who live on the lake have never seen the jungle before. The people in the jungle have never seen people working in a factory. So this is really their first opportunity to see their country — how beautiful it is, how precious it is, and how important it is to preserve and protect that beauty”. Adapted from an interview in the Huffington Post.

AWARDS

World Cinema Grand Jury Prize-Best Documentary - Sundance 2013
Golden Gate Award-Best Documentary Feature – SFIFF

Radio Unnameable @ ECHO
Oct 18 @ 8:30 pm
Directors: Paul Lovelace & Jessica Wolfson
USA | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 87 minutes
Film source: Kino Lorber
Note: This film has been specially selected by  Green Valley Media
Bob Fass will attend the screening and the post-screening Q&A

Radio-Unnameable

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Legendary New York disc jockey Bob Fass revolutionized late night FM radio by serving as a cultural hub for music, politics and audience participation for nearly 50 years. Long before today’s innovations in social media, Fass utilized the airwaves for mobilization, encouraging luminaries and ordinary listeners to talk openly, taking the program in surprising directions. Radio Unnameable is a visual and aural collage that pulls from Bob Fass’s immense archive of audio, film, photographs, and video that has been sitting dormant until now.
With archival audio and visual appearances by: Bob Dylan, Shirley Clarke, Jose Feliciano Kinky Friedman, Allen Ginsberg, Abbie Hoffman, Herbert Hunke, The Incredible String Band, Carly Simon, Dave Van Ronk, Holly Woodlawn, Karen Dalton.

Oct
19
Sat
It’s Such a Beautiful Day @ ECHO
Oct 19 @ 11:00 am
Director: Don Hertzfeldt
USA | 2013 | Fiction | Animation
Run Time: 62 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker 

It's Such a Beautiful Day

GET TICKETS
Cult animator and Academy Award nominee Don Hertzfeldt has seamlessly combined his three short films about a troubled man named Bill (Everything will be OK (2006), I Am So Proud of You (2008), and It’s Such a Beautiful Day (2011), into a darkly comedic, beautiful new feature film, captured entirely in-camera on an antique 35mm animation stand. Built in the 1940s, it is one of the last surviving cameras of its kind still operating in America, and was indispensable in the creation of the films’ unique visual effects and experimental images. “The film turns into an astonishing epic of the human experience with mortality and the frailty of the flesh, rendered in the combination of Hertzfeldt’s primitive stick figures, flashes of real-world pictures and a jaw-dropping sound design” - Scott Renshaw, SLC Weekly

Magnetic Reconnection @ ECHO
Oct 19 @ 11:00 am
Director: Kyle Armstrong
Canada | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 6 minutes
Note: Playing with It’s Such a Beautiful Day

Magnetic-Reconnection

Contrasting the northern lights of Canada’s north with the harsh landscapes and decaying manmade debris littered around Churchill Manitoba.

The End of Time @ ECHO
Oct 19 @ 12:30 pm
Director: Peter Mettler
Canada | Experimental
Run Time: 114 minutes
Film source: First Run Features

The End of Time

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Canadian-Swiss filmmaker and photographer Peter Mettler’s stunning and provocative films combine elements of documentary, essay, and experimental cinema. The End of Time is a peripatetic exploration that challenges our conception of time, and perhaps the very fabric of our existence. With brilliant photography and a knack for capturing astonishing moments, The End of Time journeys from the CERN particle accelerator near Geneva to the lava flows in Hawaii that have overtaken all but one home on the south side of the Big Island; from the disintegration of inner-city Detroit to a Hindu funeral rite near the place of Buddha’s enlightenment to a transcendent final section that simply must be seen on the big screen.” Imagine Science Film Festival. Mettler is in the forefront of a new genre that involves mixing images much the way deejays mix sounds and beats, dissolving multiple frames to create fresh, unified designs; but in his case, it is with the purpose of asking big questions and making connections between the infinitesimally small and imponderably vast.

Leviathan @ ECHO
Oct 19 @ 2:45 pm
Director: Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Verena Paravel
France | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 87 minutes
Film source: Chihuly Workshop
Sponsor: VT Energy Investment Corporation=

Leviathan

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A groundbreaking, immersive portrait of the contemporary commercial fishing industry. Filmed off the coast of New Bedford, Massachusetts, Leviathan follows a hulking groundfish trawler, into the surrounding murky black waters on a weeks-long fishing expedition. But instead of romanticizing the labor or partaking in the longstanding tradition of turning fisherfolk into images, the filmmakers present a vivid, almost-kaleidoscopic representation of players, both human and marine. Employing an arsenal of cameras that passed freely from film crew to ship crew; that swoop from below sea level to astonishing bird’s-eye views, the film that emerges is unlike anything that has been seen before. Entirely dialogue-free, but mesmerizing and gripping throughout, it is a cosmic portrait of one of mankind’s oldest endeavors..

About the Directors: Véréna Paravel and Lucien Castaing-Taylor are filmmakers, artists, and anthropologists, who work at the Sensory Ethnography Lab at Harvard University. Their work is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art (NY) and the British Museum, and has been screened at the AFI, BAFICI, Berlin, CPH:DOX, Locarno, NewYork, Toronto, and Viennale film festivals, and exhibited at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts, the Centre Pompidou, the Berlin Kunsthalle, and elsewhere.

Awards

Sevilla International Film Festival – Non-Fiction Eurodoc Award
Belfort International Film Festival – Grand Jury Award
Locarno International Film Festival – Fipresci jury award

Oct
20
Sun
Make Hummus Not War @ ECHO
Oct 20 @ 11:00 am
Director: Trevor Graham
Australia | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 77 minutes
Film source: Yarrabank Films
Sponsor Burlington-Bethlehem-Arad Sister City Program

Make Hummus Not War Director Trevor Graham

GET TICKETS
Can a regional love of hummus be a recipe for peace in the Middle East? One of the oldest-known prepared foods in human history, hummus is claimed by multiple Middle-Eastern nationalities. So when Trevor Graham, a self-described hummus tragic, learned of a Lebanese plan to sue Israel for acting as if it had proprietary rights over the dish, he was intrigued and hungry for more. With Israel, Lebanon and Palestine fighting over who “owns” the hummus heritage, Graham set off on a personal, culinary and humorous journey through the hummus bars and kitchens of Beirut, Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and New York. Along the way he encounters doyenne of Middle East cuisine, Claudia Roden, zealots, Jewish settlers, political activists, chick pea farmers, novelists and sheikhs.

The Genius of Marian @ ECHO
Oct 20 @ 1:00 pm
Director: Banker White, Anna Fitch
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 84 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker
Sponsor: Nora and Nancy Bercaw in honor of Beau Bercaw 

Playing with: There’s No Hole in My Head
Director:
 Alison Segar | USA | 2011 | Documentary | 15 minutes

Genius of Marian

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A visually rich, emotionally complex story that follows Pam White in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease as her son, the filmmaker, documents her struggles to retain her sense of self. After she is diagnosed at age 61 life begins to change for Pam and everyone around her. Pam’s husband grapples with his changing role from partner to caregiver. Her adult children each find ways to show their love and support while mourning the slow loss of their mother. And Pam deals with the fear that she will be institutionalized for her disease. This delicate film treats the subject with a humor and a light touch while serving as a meditation on the role of memory in creating legacy.

 

Director’s Statment

I have been making documentary films for more than a decade and each project has been deeply important to me in its own way.  My most recent film, THE GENIUS OF MARIAN, is the most personal and most challenging project I have ever undertaken. I approached this film both as a loving son and as a patient observer.  It is a story about my extraordinary mother, Pam White, and her struggle with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. On the surface, the film is about my family’s efforts to come to terms with the changes Alzheimer’s disease brings. But it is also a meditation on the meaning of family, the power of art and the beautiful and painful ways we cope with illness and loss. The last few years have been a roller coaster of emotions, filled with frustration, sadness, joy and celebration. I didn’t originally set out to make a documentary film about my mother’s disease. The project began as a series of informal recorded conversations with my mom in the months after her Alzheimer’s diagnosis in 2009. She had begun writing a memoir called “The Genius of Marian” about her own mother (my grandmother), Marian Williams Steele. Marian was a well-loved and well-known painter and was in many ways the matriarch of our family. In 2001, Marian died of Alzheimer’s disease at the age of 89.

Soon after my mom started writing the book, she began to struggle with typing and other mental tasks. To help her continue the project, I began filming our conversations. For the next three years, I recorded both the big events and the small details of my family’s changing reality. I filmed my parents recounting stories of how they met and fell in love. I captured my mother’s delight at the birth of her grandchildren. But I also documented the slow erosion of my mother’s ability to dress and feed herself, her waning independence, and her fierce resistance to accepting help from professional caregivers.

I grew up feeling like my mom could do it all—and often, she did. She worked full-time while raising my siblings and me, maintained deep friendships and dedicated herself to helping others, both in her personal life and in her career as a therapist. She loved being a mom and encouraged us to be ourselves, always stressing how important it was to talk about our feelings, especially when times were tough. That’s why it was especially painful to see her frozen by the shame of her diagnosis, unable to talk openly about what she was experiencing. And despite being a loving, willing and available family, we also struggled to share our thoughts and feelings with each other. Before she was ready to talk candidly about her diagnosis, my mom and I were able to connect by remembering Marian, someone we’d both loved and had lost to the disease that was now affecting my mother. These intimate conversations became a kind of therapy space and my mom began to share the complex emotions related to what she was going through. At the same time, filming with the other members of my family provided a way for each of us to celebrate my mother’s life while processing difficult feelings about how she was changing. I am grateful to my siblings and father for having the bravery to share so openly. I have been especially moved by my father, who displayed tremendous compassion and loyalty while grappling with his changing role from partner to caregiver. The spirit of my mother’s book project was my point of departure — the deep desire to memorialize someone you love and to connect with the difficult and complex emotions that surround losing them. My goal is to create a film that finds light and beauty in a place often shrouded in shame and confusion. A patient approach to production has helped me capture the essence of my family’s story. I’ve shared warmth and intimacy in conversations with my mother, laid bare our family’s challenges in caring for her and allowed myself to feel the silence that increasingly fills my parents’ house. I believe the story is deeply important and powerfully told and I trust it will resonate not only for those directly affected by Alzheimer’s disease, but for with anyone who has had to reconcile complicated emotions around aging and loss. It is from this place that I know we have created something special.

~ Banker White, Director

There’s No Hole In My Head @ ECHO
Oct 20 @ 1:00 pm
Director: Alison Segar
USA | 2011 | Documentary
Run Time: 15 minutes
Sponsor: Jessica Nordhaus & Michael Sheeser
Playing with: Genius of Marian

No-Hole-In-My-Head

In 2007, aged 54, Abby Hale was diagnosed with early onset of Alzheimer’s. As a mom and medical practitioner Abby eloquently shares with grace and insight what she has both gained and lost as a result.