Calendar

Oct
13
Sun
Hot Water @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Lizabeth Rogers & Kevin Flint
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker
Also: Q&A with Lizabeth Rogers, moderated by Bill Stetson 

Hot Water

GET TICKETS
Hot Water tells the story of the contamination that runs through our air, soil and, even more dramatically, our water. Despite messages from older films, such as Fat Man and Little Boy and Duck and Cover, which led us to believe it was safe to eat, drink and breathe in the shadow of the atomic bomb, the reality is that our ground water, air and soil are contaminated with some of the most toxic heavy metals on the planet. The filmmakers begin in South Dakota witnessing communities overwhelmed by cancer from what they described as constant exposure to uranium from local mining interests. They then follow the story to Oklahoma to explain the economic model of the industry. Interviews with leading scientists and environmentalist such as Dennis Kucinich are interspersed with personal insights: “I took this journey because I was pissed off. I felt like an idiot because I believed the lies. I believed we were safe. I made this film because people need to know the truth.” – Lizabeth Rogers

Oct
14
Mon
A River Changes Course @ Film House
Oct 14 @ 5:45 pm

Director: Kalyanee Mam
Cambodia/USA | 2013 | Documentary | Cambodian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 83 minutes
Film source: The Film Collaborative

A River Changes Course

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This mesmerizing film, in a refreshing departure from polemical envrionmental films, follows three Cambodian families – one living in a floating hut on the Tonlé Sap river, one dwelling deep in the jungle, and one whose daughter moves to Phnom Penh to work in a garment factory – as their world is transformed by forces beyond their power to control or understand. The cinematography and pacing gently transport us into their lives.

Director’s statement: “My approach to documentary filmmaking has been to tell the human story rather than the politcal one [...] Filmmaking is about asking the right questions, not finding solutions and for me the best way to do this is to explore the lives of people and allow them to tell their own stories. The experts for me are the people themselves. When people in Cambodia view this film, it’s often their first opportunity to travel to different parts of the country. Those who live on the lake have never seen the jungle before. The people in the jungle have never seen people working in a factory. So this is really their first opportunity to see their country — how beautiful it is, how precious it is, and how important it is to preserve and protect that beauty”. Adapted from an interview in the Huffington Post.

AWARDS

World Cinema Grand Jury Prize-Best Documentary - Sundance 2013
Golden Gate Award-Best Documentary Feature – SFIFF

Bottled Life @ ECHO
Oct 14 @ 6:30 pm
Director: Urs Schnell
Switzerland | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 90 minutes
Film source: Rise and Shine
Sponsor: VT Council on World Affairs

Bottled Life, Nestle

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Do you know how to turn ordinary water into a billion-dollar business? In Switzerland there’s a company which has developed the art to perfection – Nestlé. This company dominates the global business in bottled water. Swiss journalist Res Gehringer has investigated this money-making phenomena. Nestlé refused to cooperate, on the pretext that it was “the wrong film at the wrong time”. So Gehringer went on a journey of exploration, researching the story in the USA, Nigeria and Pakistan. His journey into the world of bottled water provides insight into the strategies of the most powerful food and beverage company in the world.

Awards

Winner: GreenMe Festival, Berlin

Presented

by
Jen Fleckenstein, Vermont Certified Class II Water Operator, Clear Water Filtration, and Board Member, Pure Water for the World, Inc.

Oct
16
Wed
Hannah Arendt @ Film House
Oct 16 @ 6:00 pm

Director: Margarethe von Trotte
Germany | 2013 | Fiction | English and German w/English subtitles
Run Time: 113 minutes
Film source: Zeitgeist Films
Sponsor: Institute for Civic Engagement
Q&A with: Sandy Baird 

Hannah Arendt

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A complex and compelling biopic of one of the most original thinkers of the 20th Century, Hannah Arendt delves deeply into the philosophical and personal life of its title character. The film marks the sixth cinematic collaboration between director Margarethe von Trotta, one of the leading figures of the New German Cinema, and star Barbara Sukowa, one of that movements most important performers. Sukowa’s nuanced performance reveals the deeply personal emotions that underpin – sometimes complicatedly – Arendt’s groundbreaking philosophy. Hannah Arendt shuttles back and forth between Arendt’s middle age, when she developed and refined her theory of evil, and her youth, when she studied with Martin Heidegger, whose subsequent affiliation with the Nazi Party caused her to call her own work into question. In its early scenes of Arendt covering the trial of Adolf Eichmann for The New Yorker, Von Trotta boldly blends actuality footage of the courtroom proceedings with her film’s “regular” fiction scenes, thereby encouraging the viewer to consider, as Arendt herself did, the links between past and present.

Director’s statement: This is a film that shows Arendt as a person caught between her thoughts and her emotions—one who often has to disentangle her intellect from her feelings. We see her as a passionate thinker and professor; as a woman capable of lifelong friendship—she was hailed as a woman who was a “genius at friendship”—but also as a fighter who courageously defended her ideas and never shied away from any confrontation. But her goal was always to understand. Her signature declaration, “I want to understand,” is the phrase that best describes her.

Oct
17
Thu
Bottled Life @ ECHO
Oct 17 @ 3:30 pm
Director: Urs Schnell
Switzerland | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 90 minutes
Film source: Rise and Shine
Sponsor: VT Council on World Affairs

Bottled Life, Nestle

GET TICKETS
Do you know how to turn ordinary water into a billion-dollar business? In Switzerland there’s a company which has developed the art to perfection – Nestlé. This company dominates the global business in bottled water. Swiss journalist Res Gehringer has investigated this money-making phenomena. Nestlé refused to cooperate, on the pretext that it was “the wrong film at the wrong time”. So Gehringer went on a journey of exploration, researching the story in the USA, Nigeria and Pakistan. His journey into the world of bottled water provides insight into the strategies of the most powerful food and beverage company in the world.

Awards

Winner: GreenMe Festival, Berlin

Presented

by
Jen Fleckenstein, Vermont Certified Class II Water Operator, Clear Water Filtration, and Board Member, Pure Water for the World, Inc.

Oct
18
Fri
Lunchtime Shorts: On the Edge @ BCA
Oct 18 @ 12:00 pm

A special program of short experimental films, curated by Carole Zucker.

The Lunchtime Shorts Series is sponsored in part by Middlebury College

Carole Zucker is a Professor Emeritus of Film Studies at Concordia University in Montreal, where she taught for 35 years. She has published 7 books and is working on a biography of the acting teacher, Stella Adler. Zucker teaches acting workshops in Montreal and the Burlington area, and will be teaching acting for Film Production students at Champlain College.

Eigenheim

Eigenhiem
Directors: Anja Dornieden and Juan David González Monroy | Germany | 2012 | Experimental | 16 minutes

In the German Democratic Republic children played with dollhouses made to resemble the type of life they would one day grow up to have. Now many of these houses can be found for sale on Ebay or in collectors’ hands.
The dollhouses that survive do so as idealized images of a time and place that no longer exists. Through the words of their past and new owners, Eigenheim looks at the memories that once dwelled in these spaces to explore the remnants of a lost world..
About the Director: Anja Dornieden is a filmmaker currently living and working in Berlin. She obtained a Fulbright Scholarship to study at The New School University from 2007 until 2010. During her time in New York she started making her own documentary and experimental films in Super8 and 16mm.

I Was Here

I-was-here
Director: Phillipe Leonard | Canada/Quebec | 2008 | Experimental | 5 minutes

These images were captured during a long afternoon spent sitting in front of the Pantheon in Rome, paced by the sound of a shutter regularly opening and closing for long exposures whose duration was counted off in a whisper. At precise intervals, the photosensitive surface recorded the constant flow of tourists, people-watchers, cars and animals as they moved, stopped, gathered, and took photos. The historic building thus reveals itself as a magnet whose pull on people has lasted for centuries. I Was Here is a reference to the common phrase often found scratched on public walls, marks left as visible proof of a person’s visit to a place. Like that age-old practice, travel photography is an attempt to record a person’s presence in a particular place – a photographed place taken home as proof. The soundtrack comes from the same place, but from a different timeline: it was compiled from the audio tracks of amateur videos posted to YouTube. These audio snippets, all recorded in front of the same landmark, tell a collective story through each “I” that has recorded a visit to that same piazza. The clips of murmuring crowds were then edited and manipulated to give them a particular synchronization with the images.
About the Director: Philippe Leonard is a filmmaker living and working between Montreal and New York. His artistic practice explores still and moving images through film, photography, performance and installations emphasizing a hybrid approach between analogue and digital techniques. His theoretical and aesthetic reflections focus on the temporality and spectral dimension of physical spaces, sensory documentary practices and urbanism. Distributed by Light Cone and CFMDC, his work has been showcased in notable international contexts such as the Rotterdam International Film Festival (Netherlands), Festival des Cinémas Différents (Paris), Cineteca di Bologna (Italy), Festival du nouveau cinéma (Montreal), EXiS Experimental Film and Video Festival (Seoul), European Media Arts Festival (Germany), O ‘Gallery (Milan), Museo Nitsch (Naples), Edinburgh International Film Festival (UK), Annecy International animated film festival (France), Anthology Film Archive (NYC), etc. As a cinematographer, he is involved in artistic, documentary and commercial audiovisual projects, using a broad range of cameras and formats: Super 8, 16mm, 35mm, HD, etc. He is a member of the Montreal collective of experimental cinema Double Negative

Lacuna

Lacuna

Director: Shannon Harris | Canada | 2008 | Experimental | 9 minutesLacuna: 1. an empty space or a missing part; a gap; an absence. 2. a discontinuity in an anatomical structure.. A portrait of open-air theaters documented under the strange light of day, emptied of the once present hum of human voices, radioed-in soundtracks and tires on gravel

L’un Ne Va Pas Sans L’autre (One doesn’t Go Without the Other)

one doesn't go….
Director: Audréane Beaucage | France | Experimental | 7 minutes

L’un ne va pas sans l’autre is a 16mm, dance- movement film It concerns a journey to a mountaintop by a solo dancer, and two couples who act as his doubles. It is inspired by Japanese Butoh dance. The main character is an incarnation of the union between the anima and animus, somewhere  between male and female. His notion of self begins in water – in which he was born. Then  he becomes conscious of the outside world and loneliness, and finally comes to terms with his solitude and and grows into an independent human being.
About the director: Audréane Beaucage is a young experimental filmmaker from Montreal, whose work revolves around movement, light and nature. The Quebecoise filmmaker has made twenty films and video shorts.

Ritournelle

Becks_Ritournelle_5
Director: Christopher Becks | Netherlands | Experimental | 3 minutes

Working independently in two different cities, Peter Miller and Christopher Becks composed the elegantly intimate corps exquis Ritournelle: Miller created the melodic yet haunting soundtrack which Becks used as the inspiration for the 16mm film, set entirely in the confines of Becks’ Berlin apartment. The subtle beauty of light beams bouncing off the surfaces of the apartment’s rooms slowly reveals the spatial context. Circles of white light dancing across the darkness of the screen give the feeling of awakening in the early morning to glimpses of daylight sneaking through shrouded curtains. The audio track works in harmony with the soft imagery to create a lovely warmth, a respite from the frenetic action of the first three films which sets the tone for the quiet, focused observations that pervade the second half of the program. Becks is Canadian.

The Broken Altar

Broken Altar
Director: Mike Rollo | Canada | Experimental | 20 minutes

A portrait of open-air theaters documented under the strange light of day, emptied of the once present hum of human voices, radioed-in soundtracks and tires on gravel. Scripting the landscape and exploring the residue of a cinematic history, The Broken Altar forms a sculptural treatment of the architectural artifacts of these abandoned and barren spaces: speaker boxes rise from tall grass like grave markers and the screens themselves are monumental, sepulchral in their peeling whiteness.
About the director: Born and raised in Saskatchewan, Mike Rollo obtained a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Film Production at the University of Regina and a Master of Fine Arts in Studio Arts at Concordia University. His work explores first person cinema and experimental approaches to documentary filmmaking. Rollo’s films and videos have been shown at festivals, galleries, conferences and venues internationally. His film Ghosts and Gravel Roads was recognized as one of Canada’s Top Ten Shorts of 2008 by the Toronto International Film Group and received the Mikeldi Silver Documentary Award at the 50th Edition of the International Festival of Documentary and Short Film of Bilbao. Mike Rollo is also a founding member of the Double Negative Film Collective, a Montreal-based group of film, video and installation artists interested in creating, curating and disseminating experimental film and video. Mike teaches film production at the University of Regina.

The Handeye (Bone Ghosts)

Handeye
Director: Juan David González Monroy & Anja Dornieden | Austria | Experimental | 7 minutes

In early 20th century Vienna Robert Musil invited Sigmund Freud to partake in, what he called, “a very special séance”. Seated at the table Musil revealed that they were going to summon the ghost of Frans Anton Mesmer, discoverer of animal magnetism and forefather of hypnosis. Musil told Freud about a series of dreams he had which involved a talking flea. Musil, who had secretly become a follower of the imaginationist school of animal magnetism wanted to question Mesmer as to the meaning of these dreams, in which said flea foretold of impending catastrophes all over Europe. It is said that Mesmer obligingly appeared and spoke in a repetitive and oblique manner. Mesmer’s words were transcribed by Freud in several scraps of paper and hidden separately in a series of objects that, owing to the vicissitudes of history, would end up in the collections of three Viennese museums. Legend has it that he who could piece together the text would find instructions for the assembly of a film. We visited these museums and, unable to break away the objects from their glass prisons, have made an attempt to reconstruct the film, hoping that the magnetic force inside the objects would transfer to the film’s silver halide crystals, allowing us to make sense of the single written testimony left over from the séance. In her diary as the lone entry for that date, Eugenie Schwarzwald, the only other known participant wrote: “A distinguished flea hypnotizes the ghost of a distinguished man.”
About the directors: Anja Dornieden and Juan David González Monroy are filmmakers who live and work in Berlin. They met in New York where they both received graduate degrees in Media Studies from The New School University. Since 2010 they have been working together under the moniker OJOBOCA. Their work encompasses films, performances, installations and workshops. They have presented their work internationally in a variety of festivals, galleries and museums. They are currently members of the artist-run film lab LaborBerlin.

The Yellow Ghost

yellow ghost
Director: Guillaume Vallée | Canada/Quebec | Experimental | 3 minutes

Director’s note: Based on a Recurrent nightmare from my childhood, usually ending in night terror A yellow specter riding a horse, the filmstrip being destroyed by multiple expositions with a flashlight, hand-processing and a heavy noise soundtrack composed by Eric Gingras. Camera less film

GET TICKETS
Hot Water @ ECHO
Oct 18 @ 1:30 pm

Director: Lizabeth Rogers & Kevin Flint
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker

Hot Water

GET TICKETS
Hot Water tells the story of the contamination that runs through our air, soil and, even more dramatically, our water. Despite messages from older films, such as Fat Man and Little Boy and Duck and Cover, which led us to believe it was safe to eat, drink and breathe in the shadow of the atomic bomb, the reality is that our ground water, air and soil are contaminated with some of the most toxic heavy metals on the planet. The filmmakers begin in South Dakota witnessing communities overwhelmed by cancer from what they described as constant exposure to uranium from local mining interests. They then follow the story to Oklahoma to explain the economic model of the industry. Interviews with leading scientists and environmentalist such as Dennis Kucinich are interspersed with personal insights: “I took this journey because I was pissed off. I felt like an idiot because I believed the lies. I believed we were safe. I made this film because people need to know the truth.” – Lizabeth Rogers

A River Changes Course @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 18 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Kalyanee Mam
Cambodia/USA | 2013 | Documentary | Cambodian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 83 minutes
Film source: The Film Collaborative

GET TICKETS
This mesmerizing film, in a refreshing departure from polemical envrionmental films, follows three Cambodian families – one living in a floating hut on the Tonlé Sap river, one dwelling deep in the jungle, and one whose daughter moves to Phnom Penh to work in a garment factory – as their world is transformed by forces beyond their power to control or understand. The cinematography and pacing gently transport us into their lives.

River-Changes-Course

Director’s statement: “My approach to documentary filmmaking has been to tell the human story rather than the politcal one [...] Filmmaking is about asking the right questions, not finding solutions and for me the best way to do this is to explore the lives of people and allow them to tell their own stories. The experts for me are the people themselves. When people in Cambodia view this film, it’s often their first opportunity to travel to different parts of the country. Those who live on the lake have never seen the jungle before. The people in the jungle have never seen people working in a factory. So this is really their first opportunity to see their country — how beautiful it is, how precious it is, and how important it is to preserve and protect that beauty”. Adapted from an interview in the Huffington Post.

AWARDS

World Cinema Grand Jury Prize-Best Documentary - Sundance 2013
Golden Gate Award-Best Documentary Feature – SFIFF

Oct
19
Sat
Leviathan @ ECHO
Oct 19 @ 2:45 pm
Director: Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Verena Paravel
France | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 87 minutes
Film source: Chihuly Workshop
Sponsor: VT Energy Investment Corporation=

Leviathan

GET TICKETS
A groundbreaking, immersive portrait of the contemporary commercial fishing industry. Filmed off the coast of New Bedford, Massachusetts, Leviathan follows a hulking groundfish trawler, into the surrounding murky black waters on a weeks-long fishing expedition. But instead of romanticizing the labor or partaking in the longstanding tradition of turning fisherfolk into images, the filmmakers present a vivid, almost-kaleidoscopic representation of players, both human and marine. Employing an arsenal of cameras that passed freely from film crew to ship crew; that swoop from below sea level to astonishing bird’s-eye views, the film that emerges is unlike anything that has been seen before. Entirely dialogue-free, but mesmerizing and gripping throughout, it is a cosmic portrait of one of mankind’s oldest endeavors..

About the Directors: Véréna Paravel and Lucien Castaing-Taylor are filmmakers, artists, and anthropologists, who work at the Sensory Ethnography Lab at Harvard University. Their work is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art (NY) and the British Museum, and has been screened at the AFI, BAFICI, Berlin, CPH:DOX, Locarno, NewYork, Toronto, and Viennale film festivals, and exhibited at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts, the Centre Pompidou, the Berlin Kunsthalle, and elsewhere.

Awards

Sevilla International Film Festival – Non-Fiction Eurodoc Award
Belfort International Film Festival – Grand Jury Award
Locarno International Film Festival – Fipresci jury award

Oct
20
Sun
Hannah Arendt @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 20 @ 1:30 pm

Director: Margarethe von Trotte
Germany | 2013 | Fiction | English and German w/English subtitles
Run Time: 113 minutes
Film source: Zeitgeist Films
Sponsor: Institute for Civic Engagement

Hannah Arendt

GET TICKETS
A complex and compelling biopic of one of the most original thinkers of the 20th Century, Hannah Arendt delves deeply into the philosophical and personal life of its title character. The film marks the sixth cinematic collaboration between director Margarethe von Trotta, one of the leading figures of the New German Cinema, and star Barbara Sukowa, one of that movements most important performers. Sukowa’s nuanced performance reveals the deeply personal emotions that underpin – sometimes complicatedly – Arendt’s groundbreaking philosophy. Hannah Arendt shuttles back and forth between Arendt’s middle age, when she developed and refined her theory of evil, and her youth, when she studied with Martin Heidegger, whose subsequent affiliation with the Nazi Party caused her to call her own work into question. In its early scenes of Arendt covering the trial of Adolf Eichmann for The New Yorker, Von Trotta boldly blends actuality footage of the courtroom proceedings with her film’s “regular” fiction scenes, thereby encouraging the viewer to consider, as Arendt herself did, the links between past and present.

Director’s statement: This is a film that shows Arendt as a person caught between her thoughts and her emotions—one who often has to disentangle her intellect from her feelings. We see her as a passionate thinker and professor; as a woman capable of lifelong friendship—she was hailed as a woman who was a “genius at friendship”—but also as a fighter who courageously defended her ideas and never shied away from any confrontation. But her goal was always to understand. Her signature declaration, “I want to understand,” is the phrase that best describes her.