Calendar

Oct
11
Fri
Panel: Self-Identity + Home: Ourselves in Our Community @ Film House
Oct 11 @ 3:45 pm
Talks & Panels
Sponsor: Champlain College

FREE TO ATTEND
Panel accompanies the screening of The Worst Thing About Coming Out and celebrates National Coming Out Day.
Panelists include: Rob Barracano, Dr. Eric Ronis, teacher, Dr Ame Lambert – of Champlain College, Dr. Kim Fountain of RU12, Representative Joanna Cole, John Chagnon, Health & Wellness Coordinator, RU12 and Tate Bates who appears in the film.

“To thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.” ~ William Shakespeare

Oct
12
Sat
Lost, Found & Remixed: Surviving Plenty: Archival Filmmaking in the Age of Mass Production @ Film House
Oct 12 @ 11:00 am
Presentation by: Rick Prelinger
Run Time: 90 minutes
Sponsors: UVM Burack Distinguished Lecture Series

Rick Prelinger

GET TICKETSTicketing Note: This is a double bill ticket that includes the afternoon panel at 2pm.

The festival is enriched through the inclusion of workshops, lectures and panel discussions with experts in their respective fields. This year our focus is on all things archival, with a special emphasis on restoration, accessibility, usage and ethics.  We’re delighted and honored to have as our keynote speaker Rick Prelinger of Prelinger archives and archive.org.  Called by some an American hero, space here could not do justice to the huge range of Rick’s achievements and we urge you to go to our website to read more.
Prelinger Presentation: Money, patience and courage are no longer necessities for filmmakers choosing to work with archives. While it can still be a struggle to access archival material, vast resources are now freely available for viewing (and often, reuse). But freedom brings new challenges. How can career mediamakers thrive in an age of mass authorship and distributed creativity? What emerging modes of archival work offer the greatest promise? And how can we best use archival material to make works that plumb moving image history so as to propel it forward? Rick Prelinger explores these and other issues in an image-rich talk that includes audience discussion.

About Rick Prelinger

Rick Prelinger, an archivist, writer and filmmaker, founded Prelinger Archives, whose collection of 60,000 advertising, educational, industrial, and amateur films was acquired by the Library of Congress in 2002 after 20 years’ operation. Rick has partnered with the Internet Archive to make over 5,000 films from Prelinger Archives available online for free viewing, downloading and reuse. His feature-length film PANORAMA EPHEMERA (2004), depicting the conflicted landscapes of 20th-century America, played in venues around the world, and his new film NO MORE ROAD TRIPS? (2013) is currently in pre-release. His “Field Guide to Sponsored Films” was published in 2006 by the National Film Preservation Foundation.

Prelinger is Board President of the Internet Archive, has been a board member of the San Francisco Cinematheque, and sat on the National Film Preservation Board for five years as representative of the Association of Moving Image Archivists. He is co-founder of the Prelinger Library, an appropriation-friendly private research library that is open to the public, located in downtown San Francisco, and was appointed Associate Professor of Film and Digital Media at UC Santa Cruz in 2013.

1.45: Panel Discussion

Part 2 of Lost, Found & Remixed is s panel discussion with screening of clips, geared toward filmmakers as well as the general public, will look at many aspects of repurposing footage for new uses. With Alice Apley, Executive Director of Documentary Educational Resources (co-sponsor of the symposium), filmmaker Caroline Martel, an internationally renowned award-winning documentary artist (Phantom Of The Operator, Wavemakers), Sandra Forman, entertainment lawyer, Rick Prelinger and Adrian Wood.

Also as part of the symposium we’re excited to launch the GVM – Second Time Around initiative

Green Valley Media Second Time Around Initiative (STAI) @ Film House
Oct 12 @ 2:00 pm

Green Valley Media and VTIFF have partnered to launch a new exciting initiative to identify Vermont-made films that need restoration and digitization.

STAI will be announced at the end of the Panel discussion of the Lost, Found & Remixed Symposium and will continue in the lobby outside The Film House.  STAI is a fund to provide seed money for finding, cataloguing and digitizing identifying Vermont filmmakers’ films. More details on how to submit your film to be announced on the day.  Local experts from Subatomic Digital and from Videosyncracy, as well as Panelists Rick Prelinger and Adrian Wood, will be at hand to offer advice.
Ticketing Note: The lobby session starting at 3:45 is free of charge, but the panel discussion is part of the special Symposium double bill. GET TICKET

Lost, Found & Remixed: Panel Discussion @ Film House
Oct 12 @ 2:00 pm

Talks & Panels Run Time: 105 minutes
GET TICKET Ticketing Note: This is a double bill ticket and includes the 11 am Presentation by Rick  Prelinger Sponsors: Documentary Educational Resources Panelists include: Alice Apley, Caroline MartelRick Prelinger, Adrian Wood and Sandra Forman. The festival is enriched through the inclusion of workshops, lectures and panel discussions with experts in their respective fields. This year our focus is on all things archival, with a special emphasis on restoration, accessibility, usage and ethics.  We’re delighted and honored to have as our keynote speaker Rick Prelinger of Prelinger archives and archive.org.  Called by some an American hero, space here could not do justice to the huge range of Rick’s achievements and we urge you to go to our website to read more. We’re equally delighted to welcome Adrian Wood, archival consultant to the International Olympic Committee and film researcher extraordinaire. Adrian will be bringing a new restoration of White Rock, the 1976 winter Olympics film.  A panel discussion with screening of clips, geared toward filmmakers as well as the general public, will look at many aspects of repurposing footage for new uses. With Alice Apley, Executive Director of Documentary Educational Resources (co-sponsor of the symposium), filmmaker Caroline Martel, an internationally renowned award-winning documentary artist (Phantom Of The Operator, Wavemakers), Sandra Forman, entertainment lawyer (Eyes on the Prize), Rick Prelinger and Adrian Wood. As part of the symposium we’re excited to launch the GVM – Second Time Around initiative, announcing seed money for restoring and digitizing older Vermont-made films.

About Alice Apley

Executive Director of DER since 2012. Alice is an anthropologist and filmmaker who studied anthropological representations of the Kalahari Bushmen (including the Ju/’hoansi) as part of her graduate studies at NYU. Remembering John Marshall which premiered at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston as part of a tribute to John Marshall, is Alice’s first film. Subsequent video work includes a series of museum project profiles for the Institute for Museum and Library Services and a film about the medical researcher, David Hamilton Smith, who developed the first vaccine effective against spinal meningitis. Caroline Martel

About Caroline Martel

Caroline Martel is a documentary artist who was born in Montréal the year the cellular phone was created (1973). She has been synthesizing documentary theory and practice in a variety of projects since 1998, with a special interest in archival materials, cinema history, women and communication technologies. Her first feature documentary, The Phantom of the Operator, has shown worldwide. More info…     Rick Prelinger

About Rick Prelinger

Rick Prelinger, an archivist, writer and filmmaker, founded Prelinger Archives, whose collection of 60,000 advertising, educational, industrial, and amateur films was acquired by the Library of Congress in 2002 after 20 years’ operation. Rick has partnered with the Internet Archive to make over 5,000 films from Prelinger Archives available online for free viewing, downloading and reuse. His feature-length film PANORAMA EPHEMERA (2004), depicting the conflicted landscapes of 20th-century America, played in venues around the world, and his new film NO MORE ROAD TRIPS? (2013) is currently in pre-release. His “Field Guide to Sponsored Films” was published in 2006 by the National Film Preservation Foundation. More info…     Sandra Forman

About Sandra Forman

Boston-based attorney, Sandra Forman, has a diverse practice in the areas of entertainment and copyright law. Her clients include film and television producers and directors, screenwriters, animators, book authors, talent, software and book publishers, distributors, and multi-media and educational software producers. Over the past nine years, she has also served as project director and legal counsel on the re-release of Eyes on the Prize, the fourteen-hour, Emmy Award winning series on America’s Civil Rights Movement. Ms. Forman is on the Board of Directors of the Massachusetts Production Coalition, the Advisory Board of Filmmakers Collaborative where she served on the Board of Directors for over ten years, and the Advisory Committee of Women in Film and Video New England. Ms Forman will also be on hand for individual advice to filmmakers on legal issues.   Adrian Wood

About Adrian Wood

BAFTA award winning archive documentary producer, film researcher and author Adrian Wood is known internationally for the idea, knowledge and research which gave birth to the series of “in Color” archival film based television programs. Adrian has been archival consultant/producer for the International Olympic Committee for the past few years. Sunday, Oct 13 at 3pm Adrian will also be giving a talk about his work on Restoring Olympic films and at 7:45 pm there will be a screening of White Rock, the newly restored version of the 1976 Winter Olympics Games.

Oct
13
Sun
Restoring Olympic Films @ Film House
Oct 13 @ 3:00 pm

Presentation by: Adrian Wood, archive consultant to the IOC.
Ticketing Note: This event is part of a triple bill with A Passion For Snow and White Rock and includes a reception.
Run Time: 60 minutes

GET TICKETS
In the mid-1990s the International Olympic realized that serious gaps existed in its audio-visual patrimony. To address this a project was initiated to recover, restore and preserve the Official Films of the Games. As part of this initiative Adrian Wood was engaged to assist in the process given his experience in the location and acquisition of archival materials. Now the project approaches completion, scheduled for December next year, his presentation will give an overview of what this collection is, what are the Official Films and the changing role they play in chronicling the modern Olympic Games. A major theme will be the technical problems that have been faced by him and his IOC colleagues in what will be an almost 20 year adventure in the midst of an on-going technical revolution.

Of interest to professionals and the general public, the presentation is also a natural follow up to the Saturday Symposium: Lost, Found & Remixed.

Adrian-Wood
BAFTA award winning archive documentary producer, film researcher and author Adrian Wood’s personal mantra in the hunt for unknown footage: “It’s not that it doesn’t exist, it’s just that we haven’t yet found it…”. Read more…

 

Hot Water @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Lizabeth Rogers & Kevin Flint
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker
Also: Q&A with Lizabeth Rogers, moderated by Bill Stetson 

Hot Water

GET TICKETS
Hot Water tells the story of the contamination that runs through our air, soil and, even more dramatically, our water. Despite messages from older films, such as Fat Man and Little Boy and Duck and Cover, which led us to believe it was safe to eat, drink and breathe in the shadow of the atomic bomb, the reality is that our ground water, air and soil are contaminated with some of the most toxic heavy metals on the planet. The filmmakers begin in South Dakota witnessing communities overwhelmed by cancer from what they described as constant exposure to uranium from local mining interests. They then follow the story to Oklahoma to explain the economic model of the industry. Interviews with leading scientists and environmentalist such as Dennis Kucinich are interspersed with personal insights: “I took this journey because I was pissed off. I felt like an idiot because I believed the lies. I believed we were safe. I made this film because people need to know the truth.” – Lizabeth Rogers

Oct
14
Mon
A River Changes Course @ Film House
Oct 14 @ 5:45 pm

Director: Kalyanee Mam
Cambodia/USA | 2013 | Documentary | Cambodian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 83 minutes
Film source: The Film Collaborative

A River Changes Course

GET TICKETS
This mesmerizing film, in a refreshing departure from polemical envrionmental films, follows three Cambodian families – one living in a floating hut on the Tonlé Sap river, one dwelling deep in the jungle, and one whose daughter moves to Phnom Penh to work in a garment factory – as their world is transformed by forces beyond their power to control or understand. The cinematography and pacing gently transport us into their lives.

Director’s statement: ”My approach to documentary filmmaking has been to tell the human story rather than the politcal one [...] Filmmaking is about asking the right questions, not finding solutions and for me the best way to do this is to explore the lives of people and allow them to tell their own stories. The experts for me are the people themselves. When people in Cambodia view this film, it’s often their first opportunity to travel to different parts of the country. Those who live on the lake have never seen the jungle before. The people in the jungle have never seen people working in a factory. So this is really their first opportunity to see their country — how beautiful it is, how precious it is, and how important it is to preserve and protect that beauty”. Adapted from an interview in the Huffington Post.

AWARDS

World Cinema Grand Jury Prize-Best Documentary - Sundance 2013
Golden Gate Award-Best Documentary Feature – SFIFF

Bottled Life @ ECHO
Oct 14 @ 6:30 pm
Director: Urs Schnell
Switzerland | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 90 minutes
Film source: Rise and Shine
Sponsor: VT Council on World Affairs

Bottled Life, Nestle

GET TICKETS
Do you know how to turn ordinary water into a billion-dollar business? In Switzerland there’s a company which has developed the art to perfection – Nestlé. This company dominates the global business in bottled water. Swiss journalist Res Gehringer has investigated this money-making phenomena. Nestlé refused to cooperate, on the pretext that it was “the wrong film at the wrong time”. So Gehringer went on a journey of exploration, researching the story in the USA, Nigeria and Pakistan. His journey into the world of bottled water provides insight into the strategies of the most powerful food and beverage company in the world.

Awards

Winner: GreenMe Festival, Berlin

Presented

by
Jen Fleckenstein, Vermont Certified Class II Water Operator, Clear Water Filtration, and Board Member, Pure Water for the World, Inc.

Oct
17
Thu
Bottled Life @ ECHO
Oct 17 @ 3:30 pm
Director: Urs Schnell
Switzerland | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 90 minutes
Film source: Rise and Shine
Sponsor: VT Council on World Affairs

Bottled Life, Nestle

GET TICKETS
Do you know how to turn ordinary water into a billion-dollar business? In Switzerland there’s a company which has developed the art to perfection – Nestlé. This company dominates the global business in bottled water. Swiss journalist Res Gehringer has investigated this money-making phenomena. Nestlé refused to cooperate, on the pretext that it was “the wrong film at the wrong time”. So Gehringer went on a journey of exploration, researching the story in the USA, Nigeria and Pakistan. His journey into the world of bottled water provides insight into the strategies of the most powerful food and beverage company in the world.

Awards

Winner: GreenMe Festival, Berlin

Presented

by
Jen Fleckenstein, Vermont Certified Class II Water Operator, Clear Water Filtration, and Board Member, Pure Water for the World, Inc.

Oct
18
Fri
Hot Water @ ECHO
Oct 18 @ 1:30 pm

Director: Lizabeth Rogers & Kevin Flint
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker

Hot Water

GET TICKETS
Hot Water tells the story of the contamination that runs through our air, soil and, even more dramatically, our water. Despite messages from older films, such as Fat Man and Little Boy and Duck and Cover, which led us to believe it was safe to eat, drink and breathe in the shadow of the atomic bomb, the reality is that our ground water, air and soil are contaminated with some of the most toxic heavy metals on the planet. The filmmakers begin in South Dakota witnessing communities overwhelmed by cancer from what they described as constant exposure to uranium from local mining interests. They then follow the story to Oklahoma to explain the economic model of the industry. Interviews with leading scientists and environmentalist such as Dennis Kucinich are interspersed with personal insights: “I took this journey because I was pissed off. I felt like an idiot because I believed the lies. I believed we were safe. I made this film because people need to know the truth.” – Lizabeth Rogers

A River Changes Course @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 18 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Kalyanee Mam
Cambodia/USA | 2013 | Documentary | Cambodian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 83 minutes
Film source: The Film Collaborative

GET TICKETS
This mesmerizing film, in a refreshing departure from polemical envrionmental films, follows three Cambodian families – one living in a floating hut on the Tonlé Sap river, one dwelling deep in the jungle, and one whose daughter moves to Phnom Penh to work in a garment factory – as their world is transformed by forces beyond their power to control or understand. The cinematography and pacing gently transport us into their lives.

River-Changes-Course

Director’s statement: ”My approach to documentary filmmaking has been to tell the human story rather than the politcal one [...] Filmmaking is about asking the right questions, not finding solutions and for me the best way to do this is to explore the lives of people and allow them to tell their own stories. The experts for me are the people themselves. When people in Cambodia view this film, it’s often their first opportunity to travel to different parts of the country. Those who live on the lake have never seen the jungle before. The people in the jungle have never seen people working in a factory. So this is really their first opportunity to see their country — how beautiful it is, how precious it is, and how important it is to preserve and protect that beauty”. Adapted from an interview in the Huffington Post.

AWARDS

World Cinema Grand Jury Prize-Best Documentary - Sundance 2013
Golden Gate Award-Best Documentary Feature – SFIFF

Oct
19
Sat
Leviathan @ ECHO
Oct 19 @ 2:45 pm
Director: Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Verena Paravel
France | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 87 minutes
Film source: Chihuly Workshop
Sponsor: VT Energy Investment Corporation=

Leviathan

GET TICKETS
A groundbreaking, immersive portrait of the contemporary commercial fishing industry. Filmed off the coast of New Bedford, Massachusetts, Leviathan follows a hulking groundfish trawler, into the surrounding murky black waters on a weeks-long fishing expedition. But instead of romanticizing the labor or partaking in the longstanding tradition of turning fisherfolk into images, the filmmakers present a vivid, almost-kaleidoscopic representation of players, both human and marine. Employing an arsenal of cameras that passed freely from film crew to ship crew; that swoop from below sea level to astonishing bird’s-eye views, the film that emerges is unlike anything that has been seen before. Entirely dialogue-free, but mesmerizing and gripping throughout, it is a cosmic portrait of one of mankind’s oldest endeavors..

About the Directors: Véréna Paravel and Lucien Castaing-Taylor are filmmakers, artists, and anthropologists, who work at the Sensory Ethnography Lab at Harvard University. Their work is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art (NY) and the British Museum, and has been screened at the AFI, BAFICI, Berlin, CPH:DOX, Locarno, NewYork, Toronto, and Viennale film festivals, and exhibited at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts, the Centre Pompidou, the Berlin Kunsthalle, and elsewhere.

Awards

Sevilla International Film Festival – Non-Fiction Eurodoc Award
Belfort International Film Festival – Grand Jury Award
Locarno International Film Festival – Fipresci jury award