Calendar

October 2013 – March 2014

Oct
12
Sat
Short Term 12 @ Film House
Oct 12 @ 8:15 pm

Director: Destin Daniel Cretton
USA | 2012 | Fiction | French w/English subtitles
Run Time: 96 minutes
Film source: Cinedigm
Sponsor: Lorna-Kay Peal & Michael Smolin

Short Term 12

GET TICKETS
Winner of both the Grand Jury Narrative Feature and the Narrative Audience Award at this year’s SXSW Film Festival, Short Term 12 is moving, honest, and emotionally revelatory. Focusing on the residents and caretakers at a residential foster care center for at-risk teenagers, Short Term 12 explores the difficult and extremely human realities of what it means to take care of another person. The story is told largely through the eyes of Grace (rising star Brie Larson, who won Best Actress at the Locarno Film Festival for her performance), the facility’s supervisor, as she tries to find ways to deal with her own life as well as those of the residents. Grace is put to the test with the arrival of Jayden, a troubled new arrival with whom she finds a special connection. Shot in an unobtrusive, handheld style, Short Term 12 is raw, sincere, and, at times, unexpectedly funny, with terrific performances at every level.

Awards

Grand Jury Award SXSW, Best Actress Locarno Film Festival

Oct
13
Sun
It’s Such a Beautiful Day @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 11:00 am
Director: Don Hertzfeldt
USA | 2013 | Fiction | Animation
Run Time: 62 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker 

It's Such a Beautiful Day

GET TICKETS
Cult animator and Academy Award nominee Don Hertzfeldt has seamlessly combined his three short films about a troubled man named Bill (Everything will be OK (2006), I Am So Proud of You (2008), and It’s Such a Beautiful Day (2011), into a darkly comedic, beautiful new feature film, captured entirely in-camera on an antique 35mm animation stand. Built in the 1940s, it is one of the last surviving cameras of its kind still operating in America, and was indispensable in the creation of the films’ unique visual effects and experimental images. “The film turns into an astonishing epic of the human experience with mortality and the frailty of the flesh, rendered in the combination of Hertzfeldt’s primitive stick figures, flashes of real-world pictures and a jaw-dropping sound design” - Scott Renshaw, SLC Weekly

Magnetic Reconnection @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 11:00 am
Director: Kyle Armstrong
Canada | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 6 minutes
Note: Playing with It’s Such a Beautiful Day

Magnetic-Reconnection

Contrasting the northern lights of Canada’s north with the harsh landscapes and decaying manmade debris littered around Churchill Manitoba.

Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase 3 @ Film House
Oct 13 @ 12:00 pm

FREE SCREENING
Screening free, recommended donation of $5+

COW POWER
Director: Allison Gillette
USA | Documentary | English
Run Time: 55 minutes
Sponsors: The Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase is sponsored by Ben & Jerry’s and the Vermont Arts Council

cow-butts

Our environment is in jeopardy and Vermont farmers give a $#*!. With the help of a local utility company, Vermonters are funding a program that turns cow manure into renewable energy: saving farms and our environment!

The Ridge (Pura Vida) @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 1:15 pm
Director: Pablo Irburu, Migueltxo Molina
Nepal, Spain | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 85 minutes
Film source: Dogwoof
Sponsor: Bobbie Lanahan
Special Note: US Premiere

The Ridge (Pura Vida)

GET TICKETS
This exciting and gorgeously photographed film will keep you at the edge of your seat. It tells the nail-biting and life-affirming story of a dangerous rescue mission in the Himalayan Mountains. The south wall of Mount Annapurna in the Nepalese Himalayas is known among climbers as the most dangerous climb in the world. To reach the mountain’s summit at over 8,000 meters above sea level, mountaineers have to traverse a seven-kilometer-long ridge at 7,500 meters – an impossible task, especially for “pure” climbers who brave the thin air without oxygen tanks. So when experienced Spanish climber Iñaki Ochoa de Olza falls seriously ill while crossing the ridge in 2008, his hopes are slim. After his climbing partner Horia Colibasanu sounds the alarm, 12 fellow climbers from all over the world (Switzerland, Kazakhstan, Russia and the United States) mount a highly dangerous rescue operation. We travel the world to let these 12 rescuers tell their stories in their home environments. Why would they risk their lives to reach these mountaintops? Whatever the result of the rescue will be, these 12 heroes show us that the human spirit is alive and well.

Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase 4 @ Film House
Oct 13 @ 1:30 pm

FREE SCREENING
Screening free, recommended donation of $5+

STRENGTH OF THE STORM
Director: Rob Koier
Documentary | 42 minutes
Sponsors: The Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase is sponsored by Ben & Jerry’s and the Vermont Arts Council

Irene Storm

This is a documentary about the residents of a trailer park in Berlin, Vermont who came together after losing their homes to tropical storm Irene to create an organization working on issues of system poverty in the state.

Restoring Olympic Films @ Film House
Oct 13 @ 3:00 pm

Presentation by: Adrian Wood, archive consultant to the IOC.
Ticketing Note: This event is part of a triple bill with A Passion For Snow and White Rock and includes a reception.
Run Time: 60 minutes

GET TICKETS
In the mid-1990s the International Olympic realized that serious gaps existed in its audio-visual patrimony. To address this a project was initiated to recover, restore and preserve the Official Films of the Games. As part of this initiative Adrian Wood was engaged to assist in the process given his experience in the location and acquisition of archival materials. Now the project approaches completion, scheduled for December next year, his presentation will give an overview of what this collection is, what are the Official Films and the changing role they play in chronicling the modern Olympic Games. A major theme will be the technical problems that have been faced by him and his IOC colleagues in what will be an almost 20 year adventure in the midst of an on-going technical revolution.

Of interest to professionals and the general public, the presentation is also a natural follow up to the Saturday Symposium: Lost, Found & Remixed.

Adrian-Wood
BAFTA award winning archive documentary producer, film researcher and author Adrian Wood’s personal mantra in the hunt for unknown footage: “It’s not that it doesn’t exist, it’s just that we haven’t yet found it…”. Read more…

 

The Fatwa: Salman’s Story @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 3:15 pm
Director: Alan Yentob
UK | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 81 minutes
Film source: Jill Nichols
Additional info: US Premiere
Introduction by: Mark Pendergrast 

The Fatwa: Salman's Story

GET TICKETS
Rushdie’s 1988 book The Satanic Verses, inspired in part by the life of the Muslim prophet Muhammad, was seen as blasphemous by some conservative Muslims and prompted the former spiritual leader of Iran to condemn Rushdie to death. This fascinating BBC film takes us through many of the events described in Salman Rushdie’s latest book – Joseph Anton: A Memoir. Between the narration taken straight from the language of the book, are interviews, news clips, images, and contemporary footage of the places featured in Rushdie’s story. The overall effect is the sense of traveling along with Rushdie through his story from the first moment he heard about the fatwa to his eventual freedom from police protection and the Iranian government’s death threat. We are reminded of the circumstances surrounding the publication of The Satanic Verses, including film clips showing the riots which took place in response to the book and the book burning. Rushdie is fascinating about the role of writers in society: “An attack upon our ability to tell stories is not just censorship — it is a crime against our nature as human beings”.

A Passion for Snow @ Film House
Oct 13 @ 4:00 pm
Directors: Producer: Lisa Denmore;  Assoc Producer:  Rick Moulton; Exec. Producer: Steve Waterhouse
USA | 2013 | Documentary | English
Run Time: 60 minutes
Film source: biggreen65.com
Sponsor: Seventh Generation
Ticketing Note: This film is part of a triple bill with White Rock and the presentation: Restoring Olympic Films and includes a reception sponsored by SunCommon.

A Passion for Snow

GET TICKETS Note: Special triple bill ticketing including White Rock & Restoring Olympic Films.
100-plus years of skiing history from Dartmouth, based on the book “Passion for Skiing” by Dartmouth graduate Stephen Waterhouse. Breathtaking newly-discovered footage and compelling 1st-hand accounts from alumni who helped transform the sport of skiing into the $25 billion industry it is today- are masterfully edited by VT filmmaker Rick Moulton. The film opens with footage of “The Grinch,” created by Dartmouth grad Theodor Geisel – aka Dr. Seuss – sledding downhill towards Whoville. Narrated by Buck Henry and followed by stories on how ski racing, the 10th Mtn Div, ski resorts, the Olympics/Paralympics and much more got started,

SPECIAL EVENT

Q&A led by the filmmakers and Olympic Coach John Morton ,with former Olympians in the audience, including Tiger Shaw (President-to-be of the US Ski Association), members of the Cochran Family, and a number of Dartmouth’s all time racing stars. Followed by reception at 5:30 pm in the Main Street Landing Boardroom to launch the Sport & Film series, food and cash bar. Sponsored by SunCommon.

Voices Unveiled: Turkish Women Who Dare @ North End Studios
Oct 13 @ 5:00 pm

Director: Binnur Karaevli
Turkey/USA | 2010 | Narrative | English & Turkish w/English subtitles
Narrative | 69 minutes
Film source: Women Make Movies

Sponsors: The Vermont Council on World Affairs; The World Affairs Councils of America; The Turkish Cultural Foundation

VoicesUnveiledhires

FREE SHOWING

Can Islamic values co-exist with full equality for women? VOICES UNVEILED examines this timely issue through portraits of three women pursuing life paths and careers of their own choosing in present-day Turkey. Each has defied social expectations in a democratic, secular nation where religious fundamentalism has re-emerged as a political force and patriarchal values still prevail. Well-known textile artist Belkis Belpinar, whose work combines science and kilim rug traditions, resisted her father’s wishes that she study engineering. Dancer and psychologist Banu Yucelar braved family opposition to modern dance, widely perceived as a form of prostitution. Women’s rights activist Nur Bakata Mardin helps women in underserved communities, where old beliefs hold sway, form small business cooperatives.

 As engaging as its subjects, Voice Unveiled punctuates its in-depth portraits with insights from other Turks and lively discussions that include intergenerational debates over veiling.

 

Reception for A Passion for Snow @ Film House Boardroom
Oct 13 @ 5:30 pm – 6:45 pm

A special reception to celebrate A Passion for Snow and our Sport & Film series
Food provided, cash bar.
Sponsors:  SunCommon. with support from Dartmouth Regional Affairs
catering-4

All ticket holders for A Passion for Snow  and White Rock are invited.

Hot Water @ ECHO
Oct 13 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Lizabeth Rogers & Kevin Flint
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker
Also: Q&A with Lizabeth Rogers, moderated by Bill Stetson 

Hot Water

GET TICKETS
Hot Water tells the story of the contamination that runs through our air, soil and, even more dramatically, our water. Despite messages from older films, such as Fat Man and Little Boy and Duck and Cover, which led us to believe it was safe to eat, drink and breathe in the shadow of the atomic bomb, the reality is that our ground water, air and soil are contaminated with some of the most toxic heavy metals on the planet. The filmmakers begin in South Dakota witnessing communities overwhelmed by cancer from what they described as constant exposure to uranium from local mining interests. They then follow the story to Oklahoma to explain the economic model of the industry. Interviews with leading scientists and environmentalist such as Dennis Kucinich are interspersed with personal insights: “I took this journey because I was pissed off. I felt like an idiot because I believed the lies. I believed we were safe. I made this film because people need to know the truth.” – Lizabeth Rogers

White Rock @ Film House
Oct 13 @ 6:45 pm
Director: Tony Maylem
UK | 1977 | Documentary
Run Time: 80 minutes
Film source: IOC
Sponsor: Smugglers Notch Resort
Special Note: North American Premiere. Introduced by Adrian Wood.
Ticketing Note:TICKETS CANNOT BE PURCHASED ONLINE BUT ARE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT THE DOOR. This film is part of a triple bill with A Passion for Snow and the presentation: Restoring Olympic Films and includes a reception.

White Rock

TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT THE DOOR
Photograph © IOC. The Official Film of the Innsbruck 1976 Winter Olympics in a brand new restored version. Director’s Statement: “It is never easy to make a film on the Olympic Games that will theatrically engage audiences. By the time of its release most people have already seen the event on TV, so it has to deliver on a very different level than simple reportage. I concentrated on just a handful of chosen events rather than dissipate the focus across every sport and medal. The concept was to take the audience inside those winter sports—to feel the emotion and experience the dangers and majesty that the competitors felt. Rick Wakeman’s score added considerably to the visual and emotional experience. To bring the audience even closer to the action, James Coburn was brought in to act as “everyman,” helping the audience to identify, not only with the obvious dangers, but also with the competitors high levels of skill.” Shot in Panavision utilizing using vari-speed cameras with telephoto lenses up to 2000mm, White Rock was created to take the audience on a ride that was very different from the TV coverage. It resulted in an extensive worldwide theatrical release including the US, the UK and Japan.
The restoration: The film was digitally restored in 4K for the International Olympic Committee by Warner Bros. Motion Picture Imaging using the 35mm original anamorphic negative. The 4-track magnetic stereo sound was restored and re-mastered at Audio Mechanics in Burbank, CA.
TICKETS CANNOT BE PURCHASED ONLINE BUT ARE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT THE DOOR.

Frances Ha @ Film House
Oct 13 @ 8:30 pm

Director: Noah Baumbach
USA | 2013 | Fiction
Run Time: 86 minutes
Film source: IFC Films

Frances Ha

GET TICKETS
Buoyed up by a charming, winning performance by Greta Gerwig (who co-wrote the script), Frances Ha unfolds as a witty, enjoyable series of snapshots of the life of the title character, a young woman adrift in Manhattan. Though she’s funny, charming, and great fun to get drunk with, Frances can’t quite get her act together. But, unlike director Noah Baumbach’s previous, rather more serious films, The Squid and the Whale and Greenberg (also starring Gerwig), Frances Ha takes a lighter, even comical look at young, urban driftlessness, without ever glorifying it. Shot in black and white and set chiefly in New York City, Frances Ha’s tip of the hat to Woody Allen’s Manhattan suggests that the film is as much about that dynamic city as it is about its loose-knit story. More prominent an influence is that of the French New Wave, which crops up in the film’s use of music by Georges Delerue, the charming purposelessness of the main characters, the cinematography, and even offhand references to Jean-Pierre Léaud and François Truffaut’s Small Change. Baumbach’s film boldly asks viewers to consider it within the contexts of film history, yet remains a charming, modern-day, urban fable, with which we can all identify.

Oct
14
Mon
Lunchtime Shorts: Remixed @ BCA
Oct 14 @ 12:00 pm

A Program of short films that recycle and repurpose found footage.

The Lunchtime Shorts Series is sponsored in part by Middlebury College

Curated by Deb Ellis

The Film of Her

Director: Bill Morrison | USA | 2013 | Run Time: 12 minutes

FilmofHer

A Library of Congress clerk tries to save early cinematic treasures in this doc-fiction hybrid.

An Incomplete History of the Travelogue, 1925

Director: Sasha Waters Freyer | USA | 2012 | Run Time: 10 minutes
Travelogue1925_

Subverting the form of the amateur ethnography film to reflect upon our anxiety & fascination with race, evolution, and civilization, this lyrical essay film captures the spirit of excess embodied by The Great Gatsby (1925) in fragments from home movies.

Lucky Strike

Director: Shashwati Talukdar | Run Time: 1 minute

Shashwati_Talukdar_Lucky strike

Ready! Aim! Light Up! Lucky Strike commercials from the fifties and atomic bomb tests meet their match.

End of an Error

Director: Peter Freund | USA | 2013 | Run Time: 10 minutes

EndofError

The 1954 Army-McCarthy Hearings marked the beginning of the end of the “Red Scare” in the U.S. An exploration of the phantasmatic character of historical memory, the relationship between historical and narrative time and more.

Ghost of Yesterday

Director: Tony Gault | USA | 2011 | Run Time: 6 minutes

ghostofyesterday still 2

A rotoscoped collage of anonymous home movies inspired by childhood memories of religion, altered consciousness and watching in wonder as cocktails played their magic on adults around me.

Bonobo – Cirrus Music Video

Director: Cyriak Harris | USA | 2012 | Run Time: 3.5 minutes

Bonobo

Subverting the form of the amateur ethnography film to reflect upon our anxiety & fascination with race, evolution, and civilization, this lyrical essay film captures the spirit of excess embodied by The Great Gatsby (1925) in fragments from home movies.

GET TICKETS
Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters @ ECHO
Oct 14 @ 1:30 pm
Director: Ben Shapiro
USA | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 77 minutes
Film source: Zeitgeist Films
Sponsor: Judy Gerber & Dan Higgins
Introduction by: Dan Higgins 

Gregory Crewdson

GET TICKETS
A fascinating portrait of one of the most compelling, mysterious and theatrical photographers of our time. Gregory Crewdson’s photographs are elaborately staged, elegant narratives compressed into a single, albeit large-scale image, many of them taken at twilight, set in small towns of Western Massachusetts or meticulously recreated interior spaces, built on the kind of sound stages associated with big-budget movies. Shapiro’s fascinating profile of this acclaimed artist at work includes stories of his Park Slope childhood (in which he tried to overhear patients of his psychologist father), his summers in the bucolic countryside (which he now imbues with a sense of dread and foreboding), and his encounter with Diane Arbus’s work in 1972 at age 10. Novelists Rick Moody and Russell Banks, and fellow photographer Laurie Simmons, comment on the motivation behind their friend’s haunting images.

Red Obsession @ ECHO
Oct 14 @ 3:30 pm
Director: David Roach, Warwick Ross
Australia| 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 75 minutes
Film source: Film Buff
Sponsor: Pistou Restaurant 

Red Obsession

GET TICKETS
One of the most beautiful films about wine in general, and Bordeaux and its magical product in particular. But the series of aerial shots in golden light that establish the Medoc’s important proximity to the water, the rich combination of soil and sunlight, and the extraordinary architecture of the chateaux built here in the past 300 years are not gratuitous eye candy. They enhance the dramatic arc and the rude awakening about 20 minutes in. The action shifts to Shanghai and Hong Kong, from the people who make and sell the wine to those who buy it. It becomes a rip-roaring documentary tale of power, greed, vanity and increasingly the bricks and mortar of its famous chateaux. China is Bordeaux’s biggest market but also home to the fastest growing wine industry in the world, leading to the tantalizing notion that Bordeaux’s biggest client is about to become its biggest competitor.

A River Changes Course @ Film House
Oct 14 @ 5:45 pm

Director: Kalyanee Mam
Cambodia/USA | 2013 | Documentary | Cambodian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 83 minutes
Film source: The Film Collaborative

A River Changes Course

GET TICKETS
This mesmerizing film, in a refreshing departure from polemical envrionmental films, follows three Cambodian families – one living in a floating hut on the Tonlé Sap river, one dwelling deep in the jungle, and one whose daughter moves to Phnom Penh to work in a garment factory – as their world is transformed by forces beyond their power to control or understand. The cinematography and pacing gently transport us into their lives.

Director’s statement: “My approach to documentary filmmaking has been to tell the human story rather than the politcal one [...] Filmmaking is about asking the right questions, not finding solutions and for me the best way to do this is to explore the lives of people and allow them to tell their own stories. The experts for me are the people themselves. When people in Cambodia view this film, it’s often their first opportunity to travel to different parts of the country. Those who live on the lake have never seen the jungle before. The people in the jungle have never seen people working in a factory. So this is really their first opportunity to see their country — how beautiful it is, how precious it is, and how important it is to preserve and protect that beauty”. Adapted from an interview in the Huffington Post.

AWARDS

World Cinema Grand Jury Prize-Best Documentary - Sundance 2013
Golden Gate Award-Best Documentary Feature – SFIFF

King Curling (King Curling) @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 14 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Ole Endresen
Norway | 2013 | Fiction | Norwegian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 90 minutes
Film source: Films Boutique
Sponsors: Eyes On The World

King Curling (King Curling)

GET TICKETS
King Curling is nothing less than The Big Lebowski of curling movies. If that’s not enough to intrigue you, consider that it’s also full of deadpan humor, pill-popping weirdos, and heavyset, gaudily attired Norwegians with emotional problems. A riot of color, comedy, and, yes, curling, King Curling slots itself neatly into the tradition of sports comedies about ne’er-do-well misfits (The Bad News Bears and Kingpin come to mind) who band together – in as awkward and bizarre a manner as possible – to win The Big Game. In this case, that game is the championship of curling, a sport often mocked tepidly in late-night monologues around Winter Olympics time, but the film, as a kind of bonus feature, reveals it to be more complex and entertaining than it appears. The inherent ridiculousness of the sport – ice brooms, really? – rests knowingly at the heart of this fun, outsized comedy that will have you laughing out loud and rooting for the underdog misfit loser oddball emotionally maladjusted gang of bizarro curlers.

Bottled Life @ ECHO
Oct 14 @ 6:30 pm
Director: Urs Schnell
Switzerland | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 90 minutes
Film source: Rise and Shine
Sponsor: VT Council on World Affairs

Bottled Life, Nestle

GET TICKETS
Do you know how to turn ordinary water into a billion-dollar business? In Switzerland there’s a company which has developed the art to perfection – Nestlé. This company dominates the global business in bottled water. Swiss journalist Res Gehringer has investigated this money-making phenomena. Nestlé refused to cooperate, on the pretext that it was “the wrong film at the wrong time”. So Gehringer went on a journey of exploration, researching the story in the USA, Nigeria and Pakistan. His journey into the world of bottled water provides insight into the strategies of the most powerful food and beverage company in the world.

Awards

Winner: GreenMe Festival, Berlin

Presented

by
Jen Fleckenstein, Vermont Certified Class II Water Operator, Clear Water Filtration, and Board Member, Pure Water for the World, Inc.

Act of Killing @ Film House
Oct 14 @ 7:30 pm

Director: Joshua Oppenheimer
Denmark/Norway/UK | 2013 | Documentary | Indonesian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 120 minutes
Film source: Drafthouse Films
Sponsors: Planet Hardwood & Burlington College

Act of Killing

GET TICKETS
You have never seen a film like this one. Director Joshua Oppenheimer interviews the leaders of Indonesian death squads, who were collectively responsible for the deaths of millions of Communists, leftists and ethnic Chinese in 1965 and 1966. But he doesn’t just interview them. As the ambiguous title of the film suggests, he lets them re-enact their crimes and even invites them to write, perform and film skits dramatizing their murders in the style of the American movies they love. This film is about the power of moviemaking and storytelling, sometimes cathartic, sometimes destructive, always illuminating. And, incredibly, you will also find yourself laughing occasionally.

Q&A with director via skype.
Director’s statement:
 The film is fundamentally about how we as human beings use storytelling to create our reality, to justify our actions, and to cope, or to escape from even our most bitter and painful truths. We can commit any kind of crime if we have a story to justify it.

AWARDS

Audience Award – Berlin Film Festival

Almayer’s Folley (La Folie Almayer) @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 14 @ 8:00 pm

Director: Chantal Akerman
France | 2013 | Fiction | French & Khmer w/ English subtitles
Run Time: 127 minutes
Film source: New Yorker Films

Almayer's Folly

GET TICKETS

La Folie Almayer (Almayer’s Folly)

As mysterious and dark as the Joseph Conrad novel from which it is freely adapted, acclaimed director Chantal Akerman’s latest film digs into the racial and sexual underpinnings of European colonialism. Told in oblique, introspective vignettes, La Folie Almayer follows the misguided exploits of Kaspar Almayer as he searches in vain for treasure in the Malaysian jungle, and labors ineffectually to safeguard his mixed-race daughter, Nina, the object of fascination of nearly every male character in the film. The film is lush and beautiful, with unforgettably odd and lovely images of decaying jungles, neon-lit karaoke clubs, and bizarre, floating temples. Akerman’s characteristic long takes encourage both contemplation and wonderment. Acclaimed by critics worldwide, La Folie Almayer is a puzzling and rewarding film that plunges into Conrad’s heart of darkness and brings the viewer along for the enigmatic ride.

About the Director: One of the boldest cinematic visionaries of the past quarter century, Akerman takes a profoundly personal and aesthetically idiosyncratic approach to cinema, using it to investigate geography and identity, space and time, sexuality and religion. Influenced by the structural cinema she was exposed to when she came to New York from her native Belgium in 1970, Akerman made her mark in the decade that followed, playing with long takes and formal repetition in her films, which include Hotel Monterey (1972), Je tu il elle (1975), News from Home (1976) and Les Rendez-vous d’Anna (1978). Her greatest achievement to date, however, is her epic 1975 experiment Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles, a hypnotic study of a middle-aged widow’s stifling routine widely considered one of the great feminist films.

Oct
15
Tue
Lunchtime Shorts: Reality? @ BCA
Oct 15 @ 12:00 pm

A program of some of the most interesting and varied international documentary shorts.
Your ticket includes lunch. Come up to the Loraine B Goode room on the 2nd floor of BCA, grab your sandwich and drink, sit down and watch the films.

The Lunchtime Shorts Series is sponsored in part by Middlebury College

Program curated by: Orly Yadin

No Ordinary Passenger

Director: Cabell Hopkins
UK | 2012 | Documentary | 8 minutes

Noordinarypassenger_WEB

86 years old and positively fearless, Stan Dibben recalls his hair-raising, tarmac-skimming career as a World Champion passenger.

Coffee Time

Director: Maria Fredriksson
Sweden | 2011 | Documentary
Run Time: 14 minutes

Coffee Time

A quartet of proper Swedish ladies of a certain age get together for a coffee klatch; they nibble on sweet cakes, sip from fine china and discuss all the usual things: viagra, cock rings and orgasms. Just like your grandmother used to do.

The Stitches Speak

Director: Nina Sabnani
India | 2011 | Documentary | 10 minutes
Sponsor: Documentary Educational Resources

Stitches-Speak

After

Director: Lukasz Konopa
UK | 2011 | Documentary | 7 minutes
Playing in the program Lunchtime Shorts: Reality?

After, Lukasz Konopa

Film about contemporary life in Auschwitz. In an observation from dusk to dawn, it portrays the theatre of everyday life around the grim confines of this former concentration camp.

Americanized

Director: Abhi Singh
USA | 2013 | Documentary | 4 minutes

Americanized

Irish Folk Furniture

Director: Tony Donoghue
Ireland | 2012 | Documentary | 8 minutes

IrishFolkFurniture

A animation film that explores a local craftsman’s restoration of a rural piece of furniture in a small Irish community.

Abuelas (The Grandmothers)

Director: Afarin Eghbal
UK | 2011 | Documentary | 9 minutes

Abuelas

In a small apartment in Buenos Aires a grandmother (abuela) is surrounded by reminders of the tragedy that befell her family during Argentina’s military dictatorship. Using real life testimonials from the Grandmothers of May Square the films is a testament to the tenacity of the women who conitinue to fight for the truth about their missing relatives.

The Bubbleologist

Director: Jan Bednarz
UK | 2012 | Documentary | 6 minutes

Bubbleologist

GET TICKETS
Chihuly Outside @ ECHO
Oct 15 @ 1:30 pm
Director: Peter West
USA | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 60 minutes
Film source: Chihuly Workshop
Presented by: Rich Arentzen of AO Glass

Chihuly Outside

GET TICKETS
Chihuly Outside covers nearly half a century of Dale Chihuly’s epic outdoor installations. The film chronicles Chihuly’s first experiments with floating glass on water and using ice and neon, his early work at Art Park in Upstate New York and his decade-long exploration of large-scale installations at 12 of the world’s preeminent botanic gardens and conservatories. Among many highlights, the hour-long documentary traces the development of Mille Fiori, a 56-foot “garden of glass” first exhibited in 2008 at the DeYoung Museum in San Francisco, and his most recent work, Chihuly Garden and Glass, which opened May 2012 at the foot of Seattle’s iconic Space Needle. What emerges is a portrait of an innovative artist always seeking new ways to adapt his medium to natural spaces, propelled by a desire to move, provoke and inspire viewers. Chihuly Outside completes a trilogy of films exploring Chihuly’s work, which began in 2008 with Chihuly in the Hotshop and continued with 2010′s Chihuly Fire & Light.

Rising From The Ashes @ ECHO
Oct 15 @ 3:30 pm
Director: T. C. Johnstone
USA, Rwanda | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: First Run Features
Sponsor: Old Spokes Home

Rising From The Ashes

GET TICKETS
Two worlds collide when cycling legend Jock Boyer moves to Rwanda, Africa to help a group of struggling genocide survivors pursue their dream of a national team. The young cyclists, whose horrendous personal experiences in the 1994 genocide are still fresh in their minds, are determined to train and learn how to be professional athletes. The film’s journey to the finale at the London 2012 Olympic games is rivetting. We become gradually privy to the boys’ personal traumas and root for them to achieve their new life’s dreams. Narrated (and executive produced) by Forest Whitaker

A Hijacking @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 15 @ 6:00 pm

Director: Tobias Lindholm
Denmark | 2013 | Fiction | Various languages/subtitled when not English
Run Time: 99 minutes
Film source: Magnolia Pictures

A Hijacking

GET TICKETS
Absolutely gripping from start to finish, A Hijacking eschews the action-packed histrionics one might expect from a Hollywood film with a similar premise, extracting incredible tension from the interpersonal relationships that underpin an international hijacking crisis. A Danish commercial ship is overtaken by Somali pirates in the Indian Ocean, plunging into turmoil the lives of hostages, families, negotiators, and even those of the pirates themselves. The film’s great strength is in its highly subtle insights into the lives and behaviors of everyone involved in an incredibly delicate situation. Some of the film’s most touching and realistic scenes are those of the interactions between the captors and the hostages, who strike up an uneasy, complicated coexistence. A Hijacking is directed with supreme confidence by Tobias Lindholm: the actions he chooses to not present directly on screen carry as much weight as those we do see.

Director’s statement: Director’s Statement: Before I was born my father was a seaman, but he never spoke to me about it. Maybe that is why the sea has always been on my mind. With the hijackings of the Danish-owned freighters DANICA WHITE and CEC FUTURE in 2007 and 2008, I became aware of a reality that I did not know existed. A reality where shipping companies are forced to negotiate directly with pirates. A reality where pirates earn millions of dollars and a reality where seamen are held hostage for months without any influence on their own fate. I couldn’t make a film about the truth of the hijackings in the Indian Ocean, because I don’t believe that truth exists. But I could make a film about seamen, pirates, CEOs and relatives. Because they do exist. And if A HIJACKING feels like it is about them, then I am very close to my goal.

Make Hummus Not War @ ECHO
Oct 15 @ 6:30 pm
Director: Trevor Graham
Australia | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 77 minutes
Film source: Yarrabank Films
Sponsor Burlington-Bethlehem-Arad Sister City Program
Also: Hummus tasting at 5:45PM

Make Hummus Not War Director Trevor Graham

GET TICKETS
Can a regional love of hummus be a recipe for peace in the Middle East? One of the oldest-known prepared foods in human history, hummus is claimed by multiple Middle-Eastern nationalities. So when Trevor Graham, a self-described hummus tragic, learned of a Lebanese plan to sue Israel for acting as if it had proprietary rights over the dish, he was intrigued and hungry for more. With Israel, Lebanon and Palestine fighting over who “owns” the hummus heritage, Graham set off on a personal, culinary and humorous journey through the hummus bars and kitchens of Beirut, Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and New York. Along the way he encounters doyenne of Middle East cuisine, Claudia Roden, zealots, Jewish settlers, political activists, chick pea farmers, novelists and sheikhs.

8 1/2 @ Film House
Oct 15 @ 7:00 pm

Director: Federico Felini
Italy | 1963 | Fiction | Italian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 138 minutes
Sponsor: Movies at Main Street Landing

8 1/2 by Federico Felini

FREE SCREENING
“8 1/2 is one of the undisputed classics of modern international film. Fresh off of the international success of La Dolce Vita, master director Federico Fellini moved into the realm of self-reflexive autobiography with what is widely believed to be his finest and most personal work. Marcello Mastroianni delivers a brilliant performance as Fellini’s alter ego Guido Anselmi, a film director overwhelmed by the large-scale production he has undertaken. He finds himself harangued by producers, his wife, and his mistress while he struggles to find the inspiration to finish his film.”
~ Mariah Riggs, Main Street Landing

Introduced by Mariah Riggs.

Maya Lin – A Strong Clear Vision @ BCA
Oct 15 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

A VTIFF-affiliated monthly series of films and discussions about architecture and design

Directed by Freida Lee Mack | USA | 1994 | documentary | 105 minutes

This Academy award winning film profiles the career of Maya Lin, a young artist whose winning design for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington DC became a national controversy and has since evolved to become a vision for hope and positive change in the world. The film chronicles her maturation from an emerging young enthusiastic 20-year old into a mature and articulate artist who continues to thoughtfully approach politically motivated artistic creations

In the House @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 15 @ 8:15 pm

Director: François Ozon
France | 2013 | Fiction | French w/English subtitles
Run Time: 105 minutes
Film source: Cohen Media Group 

In The House

GET TICKETS
Perhaps the most important and daring modern French filmmaker, François Ozon has created, in In the House, another in a series of provocative explorations of sexuality and desire. Claude (Umhauer, in a cryptic performance), a gifted student, impresses his teacher (Luchini) with uncommonly perceptive essays, thus beginning a surprising series of manipulations that reverberate throughout the lives of reader and writer alike. As Claude’s stories – all of which involve his classmate, Rapha, and his “perfect family” – get darker and stranger, it becomes increasingly difficult to separate fact from fiction, and Ozon revels in this uncertainty, daring us to do the same. Winner of multiple international awards, this is a deceptively simple film that, once unraveled, becomes more and more challenging; in the end, it does nothing less than call into question the very nature of storytelling itself. The film’s jaw-dropping last shot is at once a summary, a question mark, and a challenge to anyone who thinks they understand the way stories “should” be told.

Oct
16
Wed
Lunchtime Shorts: Animated @ BCA
Oct 16 @ 12:00 pm

A selection of award-winning international animated films.

The Lunchtime Shorts Series is sponsored in part by Middlebury College

Your ticket includes lunch. Come up to the Loraine B Goode room on the 2nd floor of BCA, grab your sandwich and drink, sit down and watch the films.

Curated by Orly Yadin

When One Stops

When-One-Stops

Director: Jenni Rahkonen
Finland | Fiction | Animation | 7 minutes

The world won’t stop turning even when one stops turning with it.

 

Gates of Life

Gates Of Life

Director: Hannes Vartiainen, Pekka Veikkolainen
Finland | Fiction | Animation | 6 minutes

Brief moments of life stolen from passing-by strangers form a sequence of events hidden in plain sight.

 

Oh Willy…

Oh WIlly

Director: Emma de Swaef & Marc James Roels
Belgium | Fiction | Animation | 17 minutes

Forced to return to his naturist roots, Willy bungles his way into noble savagery.

 

Damned

Damned

Director: Richard Phelan
UK | Fiction | Animation | 9 minutes

An over-ambitious beaver goes too far when he gets the chance to realize his ultimate dream.

 

Miss Todd

Miss Todd

Director: Kristina Yee
UK | Fiction | Animation | 13 minutes

The story of one young woman who dreams of flight in 1909, just as the whole of mankind is learning how to fly. Her passion is tireless, but in this era, she has more than gravity holding her down.

Awards:  Student Academy Awards – Gold Medal

GET TICKETS
The Ridge (Pura Vida) @ ECHO
Oct 16 @ 1:30 pm
Director: Pablo Irburu, Migueltxo Molina
Nepal, Spain | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 85 minutes
Film source: Dogwoof
Sponsor: Bobbie Lanahan
Special Note: US Premiere

The Ridge (Pura Vida)

GET TICKETS
This exciting and gorgeously photographed film will keep you at the edge of your seat. It tells the nail-biting and life-affirming story of a dangerous rescue mission in the Himalayan Mountains. The south wall of Mount Annapurna in the Nepalese Himalayas is known among climbers as the most dangerous climb in the world. To reach the mountain’s summit at over 8,000 meters above sea level, mountaineers have to traverse a seven-kilometer-long ridge at 7,500 meters – an impossible task, especially for “pure” climbers who brave the thin air without oxygen tanks. So when experienced Spanish climber Iñaki Ochoa de Olza falls seriously ill while crossing the ridge in 2008, his hopes are slim. After his climbing partner Horia Colibasanu sounds the alarm, 12 fellow climbers from all over the world (Switzerland, Kazakhstan, Russia and the United States) mount a highly dangerous rescue operation. We travel the world to let these 12 rescuers tell their stories in their home environments. Why would they risk their lives to reach these mountaintops? Whatever the result of the rescue will be, these 12 heroes show us that the human spirit is alive and well.

The Fatwa: Salman’s Story @ ECHO
Oct 16 @ 3:30 pm
Director: Alan Yentob
UK | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 81 minutes
Film source: Jill Nichols
Additional info: US Premiere

The Fatwa: Salman's Story

GET TICKETS
Rushdie’s 1988 book The Satanic Verses, inspired in part by the life of the Muslim prophet Muhammad, was seen as blasphemous by some conservative Muslims and prompted the former spiritual leader of Iran to condemn Rushdie to death. This fascinating BBC film takes us through many of the events described in Salman Rushdie’s latest book – Joseph Anton: A Memoir. Between the narration taken straight from the language of the book, are interviews, news clips, images, and contemporary footage of the places featured in Rushdie’s story. The overall effect is the sense of traveling along with Rushdie through his story from the first moment he heard about the fatwa to his eventual freedom from police protection and the Iranian government’s death threat. We are reminded of the circumstances surrounding the publication of The Satanic Verses, including film clips showing the riots which took place in response to the book and the book burning. Rushdie is fascinating about the role of writers in society: “An attack upon our ability to tell stories is not just censorship — it is a crime against our nature as human beings”.

Hannah Arendt @ Film House
Oct 16 @ 6:00 pm

Director: Margarethe von Trotte
Germany | 2013 | Fiction | English and German w/English subtitles
Run Time: 113 minutes
Film source: Zeitgeist Films
Sponsor: Institute for Civic Engagement
Q&A with: Sandy Baird 

Hannah Arendt

GET TICKETS
A complex and compelling biopic of one of the most original thinkers of the 20th Century, Hannah Arendt delves deeply into the philosophical and personal life of its title character. The film marks the sixth cinematic collaboration between director Margarethe von Trotta, one of the leading figures of the New German Cinema, and star Barbara Sukowa, one of that movements most important performers. Sukowa’s nuanced performance reveals the deeply personal emotions that underpin – sometimes complicatedly – Arendt’s groundbreaking philosophy. Hannah Arendt shuttles back and forth between Arendt’s middle age, when she developed and refined her theory of evil, and her youth, when she studied with Martin Heidegger, whose subsequent affiliation with the Nazi Party caused her to call her own work into question. In its early scenes of Arendt covering the trial of Adolf Eichmann for The New Yorker, Von Trotta boldly blends actuality footage of the courtroom proceedings with her film’s “regular” fiction scenes, thereby encouraging the viewer to consider, as Arendt herself did, the links between past and present.

Director’s statement: This is a film that shows Arendt as a person caught between her thoughts and her emotions—one who often has to disentangle her intellect from her feelings. We see her as a passionate thinker and professor; as a woman capable of lifelong friendship—she was hailed as a woman who was a “genius at friendship”—but also as a fighter who courageously defended her ideas and never shied away from any confrontation. But her goal was always to understand. Her signature declaration, “I want to understand,” is the phrase that best describes her.

Tanta Agua (So Much Water) @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 16 @ 6:00 pm

Director: Ana Guevara, Leticia Jorge
Uruguay | 2012 | Fiction | Spanish w/English subtitles
Run Time: 96 minutes
Film source: Film Movement

Tanta Agua

GET TICKETS
Winner of multiple awards at several international film festivals, Uruguay’s Tanta Agua is the directorial debut of Ana Guevara Pose and Leticia Jorge Romero. Simple in premise but emotionally complex, Tanta Agua (roughly translated, “So Much Water”) takes us along on a “fun” resort vacation as a divorced father (Guzzini) tries to reconnect with his kids, 13-year-old Lucía (Chouza, in a terrific performance) and 10-year-old Federico (Castiglioni). But the constant, torrential rain and the awkwardness between the family members make any sort of reconnection nearly impossible. Rather than play this situation for pathos, Pose and Romero extract from it gentle comedy and true insight into adolescence, especially in the film’s latter half, which focuses on Lucía’s misguided attempts at a summertime fling. Tanta Agua is the exact opposite of heavy-handed, leaving it up to the viewer to process and reflect on its emotional genuineness, and on the kind of uncomfortable family situation with which we can all identify.

Awards

Knight Grand Jury Prize – MIFF; Best First Feature – Guadalajara Film Festival

Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters @ ECHO
Oct 16 @ 6:30 pm
Director: Ben Shapiro
USA | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 77 minutes
Film source: Zeitgeist Films
Sponsor: Judy Gerber & Dan Higgins
Introduction by: Dan Higgins 

Gregory Crewdson

GET TICKETS
A fascinating portrait of one of the most compelling, mysterious and theatrical photographers of our time. Gregory Crewdson’s photographs are elaborately staged, elegant narratives compressed into a single, albeit large-scale image, many of them taken at twilight, set in small towns of Western Massachusetts or meticulously recreated interior spaces, built on the kind of sound stages associated with big-budget movies. Shapiro’s fascinating profile of this acclaimed artist at work includes stories of his Park Slope childhood (in which he tried to overhear patients of his psychologist father), his summers in the bucolic countryside (which he now imbues with a sense of dread and foreboding), and his encounter with Diane Arbus’s work in 1972 at age 10. Novelists Rick Moody and Russell Banks, and fellow photographer Laurie Simmons, comment on the motivation behind their friend’s haunting images.

Byzantium @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 16 @ 8:00 pm
Director: Neil Jordan
Ireland | 2013 | Fiction | English
Run Time: 118 minutes
Film source: IFC Films
GET TICKETS

Byzantium

Oscar-winning director Neil Jordan returns to the world of the undead, which he visited to great success with Interview with the Vampire in 1994. His latest, Byzantium, plumbs the sexual and psychological effects of vampirism on two ageless-but-young women whose unhappy craving for blood has rendered them unstuck in time and space. Eleanor (Saoirse Ronan, Oscar-nominated for Atonement) and Clara (rising star Gemma Arterton), by choice or by fate, must either succumb to their condition or risk their lives by seeking a cure. The world of Byzantium (the title refers to the run-down guesthouse in the faded resort town where Eleanor and Clara hole up) is rain spattered and neon-hued, vibrant in its sordidness and reflective of the characters’ razor’s-edge existence. Moody and bleak, yet shimmeringly beautiful, Byzantium is, on the surface, a vampire film, but, deeper down, a meditation on the ways that one’s choices in the past resonate in and shape the present – often with dire consequences.

Rising From The Ashes @ Film House
Oct 16 @ 8:30 pm
Director: T. C. Johnstone
USA, Rwanda | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: First Run Features
Sponsor: Old Spokes Home

Rising From The Ashes

GET TICKETS
Two worlds collide when cycling legend Jock Boyer moves to Rwanda, Africa to help a group of struggling genocide survivors pursue their dream of a national team. The young cyclists, whose horrendous personal experiences in the 1994 genocide are still fresh in their minds, are determined to train and learn how to be professional athletes. The film’s journey to the finale at the London 2012 Olympic games is rivetting. We become gradually privy to the boys’ personal traumas and root for them to achieve their new life’s dreams. Narrated (and executive produced) by Forest Whitaker

Oct
17
Thu
Lunchtime Shorts: Fictions? @ BCA
Oct 17 @ 12:00 pm

4 short fiction films from 4 continents.
Your ticket includes lunch. Come up to the Loraine B Goode room on the 2nd floor of BCA, grab your sandwich and drink, sit down and watch the films.

The Lunchtime Shorts Series is sponsored in part by Middlebury College

Program curated by: Orly Yadin

Cook Book

Directors: Martin Briggs-Watson & Andrew William Robb
USA | 2012 | Fiction | 11 minutes

Cook-Book_12

Shot without dialogue, Cook Book is a short comedy about the hazards of cooking a romantic meal.

La Hija (The Daughter)

Director: Jazmin Rada
Spain, Argentina | 2012 | Fiction | Spanish w/English subtitles | 5 minutes

LA HIJA_THE DAUGHTER_ STILLS_ POSTER Higher-Res._ CONTACT INFO

Challenging her father’s excuses not to play, Fatima uses her imagination and special balloons.

Meathead

Directors: Sam Holst
New Zealand | 2013 | Fiction | 11 minutes

Meathead

Michael is a seventeen year-old kid who gets a job at the local meat works. The place is challenging and his fellow workers aren’t exactly welcoming of new blood. It soon becomes clear that this day isn’t going to be about just trying to fit in.

The Mass of Men

Director: Jan Bednarz
UK | 2013 | Fiction | 17 minutes

Mass-of-Men-still-4

Inspired by the events surrounding the London Riots in 2011 and the subsequent infamous speech made by Prime Minister David Cameron, The Mass of Men gives harsh insight into the dangers of repression, disillusionment and apathy.

GET TICKETS
Act of Killing @ ECHO
Oct 17 @ 1:00 pm

Director: Joshua Oppenheimer
Denmark/Norway/UK | 2013 | Documentary | Indonesian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 120 minutes
Film source: Drafthouse Films
Sponsors: Planet Hardwood & Burlington College

Act of Killing

GET TICKETS
You have never seen a film like this one. Director Joshua Oppenheimer interviews the leaders of Indonesian death squads, who were collectively responsible for the deaths of millions of Communists, leftists and ethnic Chinese in 1965 and 1966. But he doesn’t just interview them. As the ambiguous title of the film suggests, he lets them re-enact their crimes and even invites them to write, perform and film skits dramatizing their murders in the style of the American movies they love. This film is about the power of moviemaking and storytelling, sometimes cathartic, sometimes destructive, always illuminating. And, incredibly, you will also find yourself laughing occasionally.

Director’s statement: The film is fundamentally about how we as human beings use storytelling to create our reality, to justify our actions, and to cope, or to escape from even our most bitter and painful truths. We can commit any kind of crime if we have a story to justify it.

AWARDS

Audience Award – Berlin Film Festival

Bottled Life @ ECHO
Oct 17 @ 3:30 pm
Director: Urs Schnell
Switzerland | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 90 minutes
Film source: Rise and Shine
Sponsor: VT Council on World Affairs

Bottled Life, Nestle

GET TICKETS
Do you know how to turn ordinary water into a billion-dollar business? In Switzerland there’s a company which has developed the art to perfection – Nestlé. This company dominates the global business in bottled water. Swiss journalist Res Gehringer has investigated this money-making phenomena. Nestlé refused to cooperate, on the pretext that it was “the wrong film at the wrong time”. So Gehringer went on a journey of exploration, researching the story in the USA, Nigeria and Pakistan. His journey into the world of bottled water provides insight into the strategies of the most powerful food and beverage company in the world.

Awards

Winner: GreenMe Festival, Berlin

Presented

by
Jen Fleckenstein, Vermont Certified Class II Water Operator, Clear Water Filtration, and Board Member, Pure Water for the World, Inc.

Dedalus Wines & Pistou Restaurant Tastings Reception @ Film House Lobby
Oct 17 @ 5:00 pm – 5:45 pm

Special food and wine tasting courtesy of
Dedalus Wine and Pistou restaurant.
Dedalus       Pistou

Followed by screening of Red Obsession at 5:45.

Red Obsession @ The Film House
Oct 17 @ 5:45 pm
Director: David Roach, Warwick Ross
Australia| 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 75 minutes
Film source: Film Buff
Sponsor: Pistou Restaurant
Special Event: Preceded by wine & food tasting presented by Dedalus Wines, Pistou and Slow Food Vermont at 5:00PM

Red Obsession

GET TICKETS
One of the most beautiful films about wine in general, and Bordeaux and its magical product in particular. But the series of aerial shots in golden light that establish the Medoc’s important proximity to the water, the rich combination of soil and sunlight, and the extraordinary architecture of the chateaux built here in the past 300 years are not gratuitous eye candy. They enhance the dramatic arc and the rude awakening about 20 minutes in. The action shifts to Shanghai and Hong Kong, from the people who make and sell the wine to those who buy it. It becomes a rip-roaring documentary tale of power, greed, vanity and but increasingly the bricks and mortar of its famous chateaux. China is Bordeaux’s biggest market but also home to the fastest growing wine industry in the world, leading to the tantalizing notion that Bordeaux’s biggest client is about to become its biggest competitor.

SPECIAL EVENT

Preceded by reception at 5:00 pm of wine tastings from Dedalus Wine and food tastings from Pistou and Slow Food Vermont.

Wajma (An Afghan Love Story) @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 17 @ 6:00 pm

Director: Barmak Akram
Afghanistan | 2012 | Fiction | Persian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 86 minutes
Film source: Doc & Film International
Sponsor: The Caroline Baird Crichfield Fund

Wajma

GET TICKETS
Achingly realistic and immediately affecting, Wajma relates an age-old story through a neotraditionalist lens. It offers a fascinating portrait of conflicting middle class family values in contemporary Afghanistan. The title character (Wajma Behar) is a young Afghan woman with a bright future ahead of her – a future that is immediately called into question when she becomes pregnant before marrying. Her boyfriend, Mustafa (Mustafa Abdulsatar), is charming and loving, but only to a point, and his insensitivity puts Wajma in a dangerous situation. As one character puts it, Afghan society is far too “outdated” to offer any decent options to an unmarried, pregnant woman. Beyond its emotional rawness and fly-on-the-wall cinematography (which deliberately echoes that of many of the films of the Iranian New Wave), Wajma’s major achievement occurs at the narrative level. Two-thirds through the film, the story shifts its focus from Wajma and Mustafa to the young woman’s father, who is faced with a crisis of his own: punish his daughter for shaming his family, or care for the daughter he loves? In presenting multiple sides of a complex issue, Wajma demonstrates its acute sensitivity to the emotional realities of everyday life.


About the Director: Barmak Akram was born in 1966 in Kabul. He received diplomas from three major art schools in France, including the École nationale supérieure des Beaux Arts. Besides directing several short films and documentaries and two full-length features (Kabuli Kid premiered in 2008 at the Venice Film Festival), Akram is also a musician, songwriter, and composer.

Chihuly Outside @ ECHO
Oct 17 @ 6:30 pm
Director: Peter West
USA | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 60 minutes
Film source: Chihuly Workshop
Presented by: Rich Arentzen of AO Glass

Chihuly Outside

GET TICKETS
Chihuly Outside covers nearly half a century of Dale Chihuly’s epic outdoor installations. The film chronicles Chihuly’s first experiments with floating glass on water and using ice and neon, his early work at Art Park in Upstate New York and his decade-long exploration of large-scale installations at 12 of the world’s preeminent botanic gardens and conservatories. Among many highlights, the hour-long documentary traces the development of Mille Fiori, a 56-foot “garden of glass” first exhibited in 2008 at the DeYoung Museum in San Francisco, and his most recent work, Chihuly Garden and Glass, which opened May 2012 at the foot of Seattle’s iconic Space Needle. What emerges is a portrait of an innovative artist always seeking new ways to adapt his medium to natural spaces, propelled by a desire to move, provoke and inspire viewers. Chihuly Outside completes a trilogy of films exploring Chihuly’s work, which began in 2008 with Chihuly in the Hotshop and continued with 2010′s Chihuly Fire & Light.

The Attack @ Film House
Oct 17 @ 7:30 pm
Director: Ziad Doueiri (read interview)
Lebanon | 2013 | Fiction | Hebrew, Arabic w/English subtitles
Film Source: Cohen Media Group
Sponsor: Barbara McGrew
Also: Film with discussion

The Attack

GET TICKETS
This challenging film – a Lebanese-French-Qatari-Belgian coproduction – focuses on the seemingly small, interpersonal questions and connections which, in reality, underpin even the most dramatic political struggles. Set in present-day Israel, The Attack’s title refers not only to the Israel-Palestinian conflict but to a more metaphorical assault on the closest personal relationship of a doctor who, in the aftermath of a terrorist bombing, finds himself at the epicenter of the battle. The Attack, which has won festival awards and attracted great critical praise, asks two simple yet potentially harrowing questions of every one of its viewers: How well do you really know the people you love? And, furthermore, what are the consequences of truly knowing everything about them? The film walks the tightrope that just barely separates not only Arab and Jewish cultures, but love and hate, as well. It is the personalized approach that gives this film its universal focus.

Interview with Director Ziad Doueiri (PDF)

Laurence Anyways @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 17 @ 7:45 pm

Director: Xavier Nolan
Canada | 2013 | Fiction | French w/English subtitles
Run Time: 161 minutes
Film source: Breaking Glass Pictures

Laurence Anyways

GET TICKETS
Winner of several major festival awards, Laurence Anyways is the third film from Quebeçois enfant terrible Xavier Dolan, whose films I Killed My Mother (2009) and Heartbeats (2010) were both international sensations. Evoking Rainer Werner Fassbinder (via Douglas Sirk), Wong Kar Wai, and Pedro Almodóvar, Dolan, not yet 25, has created a rich brew of daring cinematic accomplishment. A love story rendered impossible by the fluid nature of sexuality and identity, Laurence Anyways takes us through the many-gendered permutations of the romance of Laurence and Frédérique (Suzanne Clément, winner of the Un Certain Regard award for her performance at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival). Laurence, living as a man, reveals to his lover Frédérique that his life has been a lie, and that to be true to himself, he must live as a woman. Unsurprisingly, this revelation changes the nature of the couple’s romance, but not in ways that either of them would ever have expected. Bold, ambitious, and frank, Laurence Anyways is a challenging statement about gender, love, and human nature.

Awards

Best Canadian Feature film; Suzanne Clément – best Actress

Oct
18
Fri
Lunchtime Shorts: On the Edge @ BCA
Oct 18 @ 12:00 pm

A special program of short experimental films, curated by Carole Zucker.

The Lunchtime Shorts Series is sponsored in part by Middlebury College

Carole Zucker is a Professor Emeritus of Film Studies at Concordia University in Montreal, where she taught for 35 years. She has published 7 books and is working on a biography of the acting teacher, Stella Adler. Zucker teaches acting workshops in Montreal and the Burlington area, and will be teaching acting for Film Production students at Champlain College.

Eigenheim

Eigenhiem
Directors: Anja Dornieden and Juan David González Monroy | Germany | 2012 | Experimental | 16 minutes

In the German Democratic Republic children played with dollhouses made to resemble the type of life they would one day grow up to have. Now many of these houses can be found for sale on Ebay or in collectors’ hands.
The dollhouses that survive do so as idealized images of a time and place that no longer exists. Through the words of their past and new owners, Eigenheim looks at the memories that once dwelled in these spaces to explore the remnants of a lost world..
About the Director: Anja Dornieden is a filmmaker currently living and working in Berlin. She obtained a Fulbright Scholarship to study at The New School University from 2007 until 2010. During her time in New York she started making her own documentary and experimental films in Super8 and 16mm.

I Was Here

I-was-here
Director: Phillipe Leonard | Canada/Quebec | 2008 | Experimental | 5 minutes

These images were captured during a long afternoon spent sitting in front of the Pantheon in Rome, paced by the sound of a shutter regularly opening and closing for long exposures whose duration was counted off in a whisper. At precise intervals, the photosensitive surface recorded the constant flow of tourists, people-watchers, cars and animals as they moved, stopped, gathered, and took photos. The historic building thus reveals itself as a magnet whose pull on people has lasted for centuries. I Was Here is a reference to the common phrase often found scratched on public walls, marks left as visible proof of a person’s visit to a place. Like that age-old practice, travel photography is an attempt to record a person’s presence in a particular place – a photographed place taken home as proof. The soundtrack comes from the same place, but from a different timeline: it was compiled from the audio tracks of amateur videos posted to YouTube. These audio snippets, all recorded in front of the same landmark, tell a collective story through each “I” that has recorded a visit to that same piazza. The clips of murmuring crowds were then edited and manipulated to give them a particular synchronization with the images.
About the Director: Philippe Leonard is a filmmaker living and working between Montreal and New York. His artistic practice explores still and moving images through film, photography, performance and installations emphasizing a hybrid approach between analogue and digital techniques. His theoretical and aesthetic reflections focus on the temporality and spectral dimension of physical spaces, sensory documentary practices and urbanism. Distributed by Light Cone and CFMDC, his work has been showcased in notable international contexts such as the Rotterdam International Film Festival (Netherlands), Festival des Cinémas Différents (Paris), Cineteca di Bologna (Italy), Festival du nouveau cinéma (Montreal), EXiS Experimental Film and Video Festival (Seoul), European Media Arts Festival (Germany), O ‘Gallery (Milan), Museo Nitsch (Naples), Edinburgh International Film Festival (UK), Annecy International animated film festival (France), Anthology Film Archive (NYC), etc. As a cinematographer, he is involved in artistic, documentary and commercial audiovisual projects, using a broad range of cameras and formats: Super 8, 16mm, 35mm, HD, etc. He is a member of the Montreal collective of experimental cinema Double Negative

Lacuna

Lacuna

Director: Shannon Harris | Canada | 2008 | Experimental | 9 minutesLacuna: 1. an empty space or a missing part; a gap; an absence. 2. a discontinuity in an anatomical structure.. A portrait of open-air theaters documented under the strange light of day, emptied of the once present hum of human voices, radioed-in soundtracks and tires on gravel

L’un Ne Va Pas Sans L’autre (One doesn’t Go Without the Other)

one doesn't go….
Director: Audréane Beaucage | France | Experimental | 7 minutes

L’un ne va pas sans l’autre is a 16mm, dance- movement film It concerns a journey to a mountaintop by a solo dancer, and two couples who act as his doubles. It is inspired by Japanese Butoh dance. The main character is an incarnation of the union between the anima and animus, somewhere  between male and female. His notion of self begins in water – in which he was born. Then  he becomes conscious of the outside world and loneliness, and finally comes to terms with his solitude and and grows into an independent human being.
About the director: Audréane Beaucage is a young experimental filmmaker from Montreal, whose work revolves around movement, light and nature. The Quebecoise filmmaker has made twenty films and video shorts.

Ritournelle

Becks_Ritournelle_5
Director: Christopher Becks | Netherlands | Experimental | 3 minutes

Working independently in two different cities, Peter Miller and Christopher Becks composed the elegantly intimate corps exquis Ritournelle: Miller created the melodic yet haunting soundtrack which Becks used as the inspiration for the 16mm film, set entirely in the confines of Becks’ Berlin apartment. The subtle beauty of light beams bouncing off the surfaces of the apartment’s rooms slowly reveals the spatial context. Circles of white light dancing across the darkness of the screen give the feeling of awakening in the early morning to glimpses of daylight sneaking through shrouded curtains. The audio track works in harmony with the soft imagery to create a lovely warmth, a respite from the frenetic action of the first three films which sets the tone for the quiet, focused observations that pervade the second half of the program. Becks is Canadian.

The Broken Altar

Broken Altar
Director: Mike Rollo | Canada | Experimental | 20 minutes

A portrait of open-air theaters documented under the strange light of day, emptied of the once present hum of human voices, radioed-in soundtracks and tires on gravel. Scripting the landscape and exploring the residue of a cinematic history, The Broken Altar forms a sculptural treatment of the architectural artifacts of these abandoned and barren spaces: speaker boxes rise from tall grass like grave markers and the screens themselves are monumental, sepulchral in their peeling whiteness.
About the director: Born and raised in Saskatchewan, Mike Rollo obtained a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Film Production at the University of Regina and a Master of Fine Arts in Studio Arts at Concordia University. His work explores first person cinema and experimental approaches to documentary filmmaking. Rollo’s films and videos have been shown at festivals, galleries, conferences and venues internationally. His film Ghosts and Gravel Roads was recognized as one of Canada’s Top Ten Shorts of 2008 by the Toronto International Film Group and received the Mikeldi Silver Documentary Award at the 50th Edition of the International Festival of Documentary and Short Film of Bilbao. Mike Rollo is also a founding member of the Double Negative Film Collective, a Montreal-based group of film, video and installation artists interested in creating, curating and disseminating experimental film and video. Mike teaches film production at the University of Regina.

The Handeye (Bone Ghosts)

Handeye
Director: Juan David González Monroy & Anja Dornieden | Austria | Experimental | 7 minutes

In early 20th century Vienna Robert Musil invited Sigmund Freud to partake in, what he called, “a very special séance”. Seated at the table Musil revealed that they were going to summon the ghost of Frans Anton Mesmer, discoverer of animal magnetism and forefather of hypnosis. Musil told Freud about a series of dreams he had which involved a talking flea. Musil, who had secretly become a follower of the imaginationist school of animal magnetism wanted to question Mesmer as to the meaning of these dreams, in which said flea foretold of impending catastrophes all over Europe. It is said that Mesmer obligingly appeared and spoke in a repetitive and oblique manner. Mesmer’s words were transcribed by Freud in several scraps of paper and hidden separately in a series of objects that, owing to the vicissitudes of history, would end up in the collections of three Viennese museums. Legend has it that he who could piece together the text would find instructions for the assembly of a film. We visited these museums and, unable to break away the objects from their glass prisons, have made an attempt to reconstruct the film, hoping that the magnetic force inside the objects would transfer to the film’s silver halide crystals, allowing us to make sense of the single written testimony left over from the séance. In her diary as the lone entry for that date, Eugenie Schwarzwald, the only other known participant wrote: “A distinguished flea hypnotizes the ghost of a distinguished man.”
About the directors: Anja Dornieden and Juan David González Monroy are filmmakers who live and work in Berlin. They met in New York where they both received graduate degrees in Media Studies from The New School University. Since 2010 they have been working together under the moniker OJOBOCA. Their work encompasses films, performances, installations and workshops. They have presented their work internationally in a variety of festivals, galleries and museums. They are currently members of the artist-run film lab LaborBerlin.

The Yellow Ghost

yellow ghost
Director: Guillaume Vallée | Canada/Quebec | Experimental | 3 minutes

Director’s note: Based on a Recurrent nightmare from my childhood, usually ending in night terror A yellow specter riding a horse, the filmstrip being destroyed by multiple expositions with a flashlight, hand-processing and a heavy noise soundtrack composed by Eric Gingras. Camera less film

GET TICKETS
Hot Water @ ECHO
Oct 18 @ 1:30 pm

Director: Lizabeth Rogers & Kevin Flint
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 82 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker

Hot Water

GET TICKETS
Hot Water tells the story of the contamination that runs through our air, soil and, even more dramatically, our water. Despite messages from older films, such as Fat Man and Little Boy and Duck and Cover, which led us to believe it was safe to eat, drink and breathe in the shadow of the atomic bomb, the reality is that our ground water, air and soil are contaminated with some of the most toxic heavy metals on the planet. The filmmakers begin in South Dakota witnessing communities overwhelmed by cancer from what they described as constant exposure to uranium from local mining interests. They then follow the story to Oklahoma to explain the economic model of the industry. Interviews with leading scientists and environmentalist such as Dennis Kucinich are interspersed with personal insights: “I took this journey because I was pissed off. I felt like an idiot because I believed the lies. I believed we were safe. I made this film because people need to know the truth.” – Lizabeth Rogers

A Hijacking @ ECHO
Oct 18 @ 3:00 pm

Director: Tobias Lindholm
Denmark | 2013 | Fiction | Various languages/subtitled when not English
Run Time: 99 minutes
Film source: Magnolia Pictures

A Hijacking

GET TICKETS
Absolutely gripping from start to finish, A Hijacking eschews the action-packed histrionics one might expect from a Hollywood film with a similar premise, extracting incredible tension from the interpersonal relationships that underpin an international hijacking crisis. A Danish commercial ship is overtaken by Somali pirates in the Indian Ocean, plunging into turmoil the lives of hostages, families, negotiators, and even those of the pirates themselves. The film’s great strength is in its highly subtle insights into the lives and behaviors of everyone involved in an incredibly delicate situation. Some of the film’s most touching and realistic scenes are those of the interactions between the captors and the hostages, who strike up an uneasy, complicated coexistence. A Hijacking is directed with supreme confidence by Tobias Lindholm: the actions he chooses to not present directly on screen carry as much weight as those we do see.

Director’s statement: Director’s Statement: Before I was born my father was a seaman, but he never spoke to me about it. Maybe that is why the sea has always been on my mind. With the hijackings of the Danish-owned freighters DANICA WHITE and CEC FUTURE in 2007 and 2008, I became aware of a reality that I did not know existed. A reality where shipping companies are forced to negotiate directly with pirates. A reality where pirates earn millions of dollars and a reality where seamen are held hostage for months without any influence on their own fate. I couldn’t make a film about the truth of the hijackings in the Indian Ocean, because I don’t believe that truth exists. But I could make a film about seamen, pirates, CEOs and relatives. Because they do exist. And if A HIJACKING feels like it is about them, then I am very close to my goal.

King Curling (King Curling) @ Film House
Oct 18 @ 3:00 pm

Director: Ole Endresen
Norway | 2013 | Fiction | Norwegian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 90 minutes
Film source: Films Boutique
Sponsors: Eyes On The World 

King Curling (King Curling)

GET TICKETS
King Curling is nothing less than The Big Lebowski of curling movies. If that’s not enough to intrigue you, consider that it’s also full of deadpan humor, pill-popping weirdos, and heavyset, gaudily attired Norwegians with emotional problems. A riot of color, comedy, and, yes, curling, King Curling slots itself neatly into the tradition of sports comedies about ne’er-do-well misfits (The Bad News Bears and Kingpin come to mind) who band together – in as awkward and bizarre a manner as possible – to win The Big Game. In this case, that game is the championship of curling, a sport often mocked tepidly in late-night monologues around Winter Olympics time, but the film, as a kind of bonus feature, reveals it to be more complex and entertaining than it appears. The inherent ridiculousness of the sport – ice brooms, really? – rests knowingly at the heart of this fun, outsized comedy that will have you laughing out loud and rooting for the underdog misfit loser oddball emotionally maladjusted gang of bizarro curlers.

Almayer’s Folley (La Folie Almayer) @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 18 @ 3:15 pm

Director: Chantal Akerman
France | 2013 | Fiction | French & Khmer w/ English subtitles
Run Time: 127 minutes
Film source: New Yorker Films

Almayer's Folly

GET TICKETS

La Folie Almayer (Almayer’s Folly)

As mysterious and dark as the Joseph Conrad novel from which it is freely adapted, acclaimed director Chantal Akerman’s latest film digs into the racial and sexual underpinnings of European colonialism. Told in oblique, introspective vignettes, La Folie Almayer follows the misguided exploits of Kaspar Almayer as he searches in vain for treasure in the Malaysian jungle, and labors ineffectually to safeguard his mixed-race daughter, Nina, the object of fascination of nearly every male character in the film. The film is lush and beautiful, with unforgettably odd and lovely images of decaying jungles, neon-lit karaoke clubs, and bizarre, floating temples. Akerman’s characteristic long takes encourage both contemplation and wonderment. Acclaimed by critics worldwide, La Folie Almayer is a puzzling and rewarding film that plunges into Conrad’s heart of darkness and brings the viewer along for the enigmatic ride.

About the Director: One of the boldest cinematic visionaries of the past quarter century, Akerman takes a profoundly personal and aesthetically idiosyncratic approach to cinema, using it to investigate geography and identity, space and time, sexuality and religion. Influenced by the structural cinema she was exposed to when she came to New York from her native Belgium in 1970, Akerman made her mark in the decade that followed, playing with long takes and formal repetition in her films, which include Hotel Monterey (1972), Je tu il elle (1975), News from Home (1976) and Les rendez-vous d’Anna (1978). Her greatest achievement to date, however, is her epic 1975 experiment Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles, a hypnotic study of a middle-aged widow’s stifling routine widely considered one of the great feminist films.

A River Changes Course @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 18 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Kalyanee Mam
Cambodia/USA | 2013 | Documentary | Cambodian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 83 minutes
Film source: The Film Collaborative

GET TICKETS
This mesmerizing film, in a refreshing departure from polemical envrionmental films, follows three Cambodian families – one living in a floating hut on the Tonlé Sap river, one dwelling deep in the jungle, and one whose daughter moves to Phnom Penh to work in a garment factory – as their world is transformed by forces beyond their power to control or understand. The cinematography and pacing gently transport us into their lives.

River-Changes-Course

Director’s statement: “My approach to documentary filmmaking has been to tell the human story rather than the politcal one [...] Filmmaking is about asking the right questions, not finding solutions and for me the best way to do this is to explore the lives of people and allow them to tell their own stories. The experts for me are the people themselves. When people in Cambodia view this film, it’s often their first opportunity to travel to different parts of the country. Those who live on the lake have never seen the jungle before. The people in the jungle have never seen people working in a factory. So this is really their first opportunity to see their country — how beautiful it is, how precious it is, and how important it is to preserve and protect that beauty”. Adapted from an interview in the Huffington Post.

AWARDS

World Cinema Grand Jury Prize-Best Documentary - Sundance 2013
Golden Gate Award-Best Documentary Feature – SFIFF

Byzantium @ ECHO
Oct 18 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Neil Jordan
Ireland | 2013 | Fiction | English
Run Time: 118 minutes
Film source: IFC Films
GET TICKETS

Byzantium

Oscar-winning director Neil Jordan returns to the world of the undead, which he visited to great success with Interview with the Vampire in 1994. His latest, Byzantium, plumbs the sexual and psychological effects of vampirism on two ageless-but-young women whose unhappy craving for blood has rendered them unstuck in time and space. Eleanor (Saoirse Ronan, Oscar-nominated for Atonement) and Clara (rising star Gemma Arterton), by choice or by fate, must either succumb to their condition or risk their lives by seeking a cure. The world of Byzantium (the title refers to the run-down guesthouse in the faded resort town where Eleanor and Clara hole up) is rain spattered and neon-hued, vibrant in its sordidness and reflective of the characters’ razor’s-edge existence. Moody and bleak, yet shimmeringly beautiful, Byzantium is, on the surface, a vampire film, but, deeper down, a meditation on the ways that one’s choices in the past resonate in and shape the present – often with dire consequences.

Pyaasa (The Thirsty One) @ Film House
Oct 18 @ 6:00 pm
Directors: Guru Dutt, Abrar Alvi
India | 1957 | Fiction | Hindi w/English subtitles
Run Time: 146 minutes
Film source: Gala Global
Sponsor: VT Council on World Affairs
Introduction by: Ken Wade

Pyaasa (The Thirty One)

GET TICKETS
VTIFF is delighted to present Guru Dutt’s Pyaasa as a tribute to mark the 100th anniversary of Indian cinema. Pyaasa, a film found in both Time magazine’s and Sight & Sound’s 100 best movie lists – uses two familiar tropes – that of the starving-struggling artist and that of the prostitute with a heart of gold. Yet, both these narrative devices are reworked so thoroughly that the film ultimately becomes a statement about the poverty of thought and the hypocrisy of a crassly materialist society. Several film scholars consider Guru Dutt as India’s Orson Welles, producing, directing and starring in his own films. His use of chiaruscaro and acute close-up in Pyaasa were very innovative and avant garde for his time. Almost all scenes are shot either in tight, enclosed spaces, or through doorways and windows and framed by gates, arches, pillars and columns. This gives a sense of claustrophobia and constriction and symbolizes the constraints faced by the protagonist. Like most Bollywoood films, Pyaasa is full of memorable songs. But unlike most mainstream directors, Dutt integrates the songs into his narrative. To maintain realism, some songs are part of fantasy (or phantasmatic) sequences or expressions of characters’ emotions; other songs are filmed as poetry readings. Pyaasa was a huge box-office hit when it was released achieving a rare balance between personal artistic aspirations and commercial concerns.

Birth of the Living Dead @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 18 @ 8:00 pm
Director: Rob Kuhns
USA | 2013 | Documentary | English
Run Time: 60 minutes
Film source: First Run Features
Presented by Introduced by Rob Schmidt Barracano - filmmaker and film teacher.
Ticketing Note: This is a double bill with the late night screening of Night of the Living Dead (11:30pm, FH)- 1 ticket for both screenings
GET TICKETS

Birth of the Living Dead

In 1968 a young college drop-out named George A. Romero directed Night of the Living Dead, a low-budget horror film that shocked the world, became an icon of the counterculture, and spawned a zombie industry worth billions of dollars. Birth of the Living Dead shows how Romero gathered an unlikely team of Pittsburghers – policmen, iron workers, teachers, ad-men, housewives and a roller-rink owner – to shoot his seminal film. During that process Romero and his team created an entirely new and horribly chilling monster – one that was undeaded and feasted upon human flesh. The doc also immerses audiences into the singular time in which “Night” was shot – footage of the horrors of Vietnam and racial violence combined with iconic 1960s music puts the film in context.

 

Radio Unnameable @ ECHO
Oct 18 @ 8:30 pm
Directors: Paul Lovelace & Jessica Wolfson
USA | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 87 minutes
Film source: Kino Lorber
Note: This film has been specially selected by  Green Valley Media
Bob Fass will attend the screening and the post-screening Q&A

Radio-Unnameable

GET TICKETS
Legendary New York disc jockey Bob Fass revolutionized late night FM radio by serving as a cultural hub for music, politics and audience participation for nearly 50 years. Long before today’s innovations in social media, Fass utilized the airwaves for mobilization, encouraging luminaries and ordinary listeners to talk openly, taking the program in surprising directions. Radio Unnameable is a visual and aural collage that pulls from Bob Fass’s immense archive of audio, film, photographs, and video that has been sitting dormant until now.
With archival audio and visual appearances by: Bob Dylan, Shirley Clarke, Jose Feliciano Kinky Friedman, Allen Ginsberg, Abbie Hoffman, Herbert Hunke, The Incredible String Band, Carly Simon, Dave Van Ronk, Holly Woodlawn, Karen Dalton.

Escape From Tomorrow @ Film House
Oct 18 @ 9:30 pm

Director: Randy Moore
USA | 2013 | Fiction
Run Time: 89 minutes
Film source: PDA  Special Note: New England premiere
Sponsor: Main Street Landing & Burlington Film Society

Escape From Tomorrow

GET TICKETS
Randy Moore’s directorial debut ESCAPE FROM TOMORROW is a bold and ingenious trip into the “happiest place on earth”, and one of the most provocative films to premiere at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival. Drew McWeeny from Hitfix called it a “surrealist treat” adding “it is not possible this film exists.” An epic battle begins when a middle-aged American husband and father of two learns that he has lost his job. Keeping the news from his nagging wife and wound-up children, he packs up the family and embarks on a full day of park hopping amid enchanted castles and fairytale princesses. Soon, the manufactured mirth of the fantasy land around him begins to haunt his subconscious. An idyllic family vacation quickly unravels into a surrealist and darkly comic nightmare of paranoid visions, bizarre encounters, and an obsessive pursuit of a pair of sexy teenage Parisians. Chillingly shot in black and white, ESCAPE FROM TOMORROW dissects the mythology of artificial perfection while subversively attacking our culture’s obsession with mass entertainment

Night of the Living Dead @ Film House
Oct 18 @ 11:30 pm
Director: George Romero
USA | 1968 | Fiction
Presented by : Presented by Introduced by Rob Schmidt Barracano - filmmaker and film teacher.
Ticketing Note: a ticket to this film gets you free entry to the screening (8:00pm, BB): Birth of the Living Dead
GET TICKETS

Night Of The Living Dead

GET TICKETS
The quintessential zombie movie, George A. Romero’s first film gave rise to myriad imitators, sequels, and remakes, and reanimated the horror genre. The 28-year-old Romero employed unpolished sound, harsh lighting, hand-held cameras, and non-professional actors, which gave the film a documentary feel, making the terror more realistic. With no budget for complicated dolly-track shots, Romero conveyed movement through editing—via the rapid succession of static shots. One of the key innovations of the film, and a key factor in the film’s realism, is the relocation of the monsters from some far-off land right into middle-American backyards. The monsters are now everyday people and the film’s protagonists can’t escape back into the “normal” world. Released at a time when disillusionment was running rampant in the country—spurred by the Vietnam War and the recent assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and JFK—Americans identified with the film’s most shocking suggestion: death is random. No one dies for the greater good. Instead, people die to feed faceless, ordinary America. A metaphor for societal anxiety, the sight of America literally devouring itself and the representation of the desecration of the wholesome American family were “reflections of social hysteria” (J. Hoberman) and served as a release for the country’s repressed trauma.

Oct
19
Sat
It’s Such a Beautiful Day @ ECHO
Oct 19 @ 11:00 am
Director: Don Hertzfeldt
USA | 2013 | Fiction | Animation
Run Time: 62 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker 

It's Such a Beautiful Day

GET TICKETS
Cult animator and Academy Award nominee Don Hertzfeldt has seamlessly combined his three short films about a troubled man named Bill (Everything will be OK (2006), I Am So Proud of You (2008), and It’s Such a Beautiful Day (2011), into a darkly comedic, beautiful new feature film, captured entirely in-camera on an antique 35mm animation stand. Built in the 1940s, it is one of the last surviving cameras of its kind still operating in America, and was indispensable in the creation of the films’ unique visual effects and experimental images. “The film turns into an astonishing epic of the human experience with mortality and the frailty of the flesh, rendered in the combination of Hertzfeldt’s primitive stick figures, flashes of real-world pictures and a jaw-dropping sound design” - Scott Renshaw, SLC Weekly

Magnetic Reconnection @ ECHO
Oct 19 @ 11:00 am
Director: Kyle Armstrong
Canada | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 6 minutes
Note: Playing with It’s Such a Beautiful Day

Magnetic-Reconnection

Contrasting the northern lights of Canada’s north with the harsh landscapes and decaying manmade debris littered around Churchill Manitoba.

Laurence Anyways @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 19 @ 12:00 pm

Director: Xavier Nolan
Canada | 2013 | Fiction | French w/English subtitles
Run Time: 161 minutes
Film source: Breaking Glass Pictures

Laurence Anyways

GET TICKETS
Winner of several major festival awards, Laurence Anyways is the third film from Quebeçois enfant terrible Xavier Dolan, whose films I Killed My Mother (2009) and Heartbeats (2010) were both international sensations. Evoking Rainer Werner Fassbinder (via Douglas Sirk), Wong Kar Wai, and Pedro Almodóvar, Dolan, not yet 25, has created a rich brew of daring cinematic accomplishment. A love story rendered impossible by the fluid nature of sexuality and identity, Laurence Anyways takes us through the many-gendered permutations of the romance of Laurence and Frédérique (Suzanne Clément, winner of the Un Certain Regard award for her performance at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival). Laurence, living as a man, reveals to his lover Frédérique that his life has been a lie, and that to be true to himself, he must live as a woman. Unsurprisingly, this revelation changes the nature of the couple’s romance, but not in ways that either of them would ever have expected. Bold, ambitious, and frank, Laurence Anyways is a challenging statement about gender, love, and human nature.

Awards

Best Canadian Feature film; Suzanne Clément – best Actress

Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase 5 @ Film House
Oct 19 @ 12:00 pm

FREE SCREENING
Screening free, recommended donation of $5+

I AM IN HERE: A VIEW OF MY DAILY LIFE WITH GOOD SUGGESTION FOR IMPROVEMENT FROM MY INTELLIGENT MIND
Directors: Emily Anderson and Jim Heltz
Fiction | Documentary | Experimental | 35 minutes
Sponsors: The Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase is sponsored by Ben & Jerry’s and by The Vermont Arts Council.

I am in Here

“Do you want to know what it’s like to be thought of as stupid?” This was Mark Utter’s experience for most of his life. Mark’s autism prevents him from speaking his thoughts. A day-in-the-life movie using humor to highlight the contrast between perceptions of Mark and the man inside.

The End of Time @ ECHO
Oct 19 @ 12:30 pm
Director: Peter Mettler
Canada | Experimental
Run Time: 114 minutes
Film source: First Run Features

The End of Time

GET TICKETS
Canadian-Swiss filmmaker and photographer Peter Mettler’s stunning and provocative films combine elements of documentary, essay, and experimental cinema. The End of Time is a peripatetic exploration that challenges our conception of time, and perhaps the very fabric of our existence. With brilliant photography and a knack for capturing astonishing moments, The End of Time journeys from the CERN particle accelerator near Geneva to the lava flows in Hawaii that have overtaken all but one home on the south side of the Big Island; from the disintegration of inner-city Detroit to a Hindu funeral rite near the place of Buddha’s enlightenment to a transcendent final section that simply must be seen on the big screen.” Imagine Science Film Festival. Mettler is in the forefront of a new genre that involves mixing images much the way deejays mix sounds and beats, dissolving multiple frames to create fresh, unified designs; but in his case, it is with the purpose of asking big questions and making connections between the infinitesimally small and imponderably vast.

Michael H. Profession: Director @ Film House
Oct 19 @ 2:30 pm

Director: Yves Montmayeur
Austri, France | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 92 minutes
Film source: Films Boutique/box]

Michael H Profession Filmmaker

GET TICKETS
Over the past two-and-a-half decades, director Michael Haneke has established himself as a towering figure in modern cinema with his uniquely controversial and challenging films that have polarized audiences and critics alike for decades. Such works as Funny Games (1997 and 2007: he remade his own film), The Piano Teacher (2001), the mysterious Caché (2005), and last year’s Oscar-winning Amour explore both the dark and the loving sides of human existence – often at the same time, and almost always in unforgettable ways. Now, Yves Montmayeur, who has made the “making-of” documentaries for most of Haneke’s films, turns his lens on Haneke himself, unravelling a working method that reveals a great deal about the man. As much a meditation on the nature of film as any of Haneke’s works themselves, Michael H: Profession Filmmaker uses interviews with Haneke’s creative collaborators as well as re-contextualized footage from his films. The documentary finds a compelling tension between the warmth of the man and the horrors in his films, and is a fascinating portrait of one of the most important filmmakers of our day.

Leviathan @ ECHO
Oct 19 @ 2:45 pm
Director: Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Verena Paravel
France | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 87 minutes
Film source: Chihuly Workshop
Sponsor: VT Energy Investment Corporation=

Leviathan

GET TICKETS
A groundbreaking, immersive portrait of the contemporary commercial fishing industry. Filmed off the coast of New Bedford, Massachusetts, Leviathan follows a hulking groundfish trawler, into the surrounding murky black waters on a weeks-long fishing expedition. But instead of romanticizing the labor or partaking in the longstanding tradition of turning fisherfolk into images, the filmmakers present a vivid, almost-kaleidoscopic representation of players, both human and marine. Employing an arsenal of cameras that passed freely from film crew to ship crew; that swoop from below sea level to astonishing bird’s-eye views, the film that emerges is unlike anything that has been seen before. Entirely dialogue-free, but mesmerizing and gripping throughout, it is a cosmic portrait of one of mankind’s oldest endeavors..

About the Directors: Véréna Paravel and Lucien Castaing-Taylor are filmmakers, artists, and anthropologists, who work at the Sensory Ethnography Lab at Harvard University. Their work is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art (NY) and the British Museum, and has been screened at the AFI, BAFICI, Berlin, CPH:DOX, Locarno, NewYork, Toronto, and Viennale film festivals, and exhibited at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts, the Centre Pompidou, the Berlin Kunsthalle, and elsewhere.

Awards

Sevilla International Film Festival – Non-Fiction Eurodoc Award
Belfort International Film Festival – Grand Jury Award
Locarno International Film Festival – Fipresci jury award

Wajma (An Afghan Love Story) @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 19 @ 3:15 pm
Director: Barmak Akram
Afghanistan | 2012 | Fiction | Persian w/English subtitles
Run Time: 86 minutes
Film source: Doc & Film International
Sponsor: The Caroline Baird Crichfield Fund 

Wajma

GET TICKETS
Achingly realistic and immediately affecting, Wajma relates an age-old story through a neotraditionalist lens. It offers a fascinating portrait of conflicting middle class family values in contemporary Afghanistan. The title character (Wajma Behar) is a young Afghan woman with a bright future ahead of her – a future that is immediately called into question when she becomes pregnant before marrying. Her boyfriend, Mustafa (Mustafa Abdulsatar), is charming and loving, but only to a point, and his insensitivity puts Wajma in a dangerous situation. As one character puts it, Afghan society is far too “outdated” to offer any decent options to an unmarried, pregnant woman. Beyond its emotional rawness and fly-on-the-wall cinematography (which deliberately echoes that of many of the films of the Iranian New Wave), Wajma’s major achievement occurs at the narrative level. Two-thirds through the film, the story shifts its focus from Wajma and Mustafa to the young woman’s father, who is faced with a crisis of his own: punish his daughter for shaming his family, or care for the daughter he loves? In presenting multiple sides of a complex issue, Wajma demonstrates its acute sensitivity to the emotional realities of everyday life.


About the Director: Barmak Akram was born in 1966 in Kabul. He received diplomas from three major art schools in France, including the École nationale supérieure des Beaux Arts. Besides directing several short films and documentaries and two full-length features (Kabuli Kid premiered in 2008 at the Venice Film Festival), Akram is also a musician, songwriter, and composer.

Guild Fine Meats Food Tasting / Cash Bar Reception @ Film House Lobby
Oct 19 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Guild-Fine-Meats-logo
Special Food tasting from Guild Fine Meats and Cash bar
Sponsoring the screening of Meat Hooked! at 5PM

Meat Hooked! @ Film House
Oct 19 @ 5:00 pm
Director: Suzanne Wasserman
USA | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 55 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker
Sponsor: Kate & Bill Schubart
Special Event: Q&A w/filmmaker and talk by Cole Ward, the Gourmet Butcher. Preceded by food reception at 4pm sponsored and provided by Guild Fine Meats, cash bar.

Playing with: Ô DIVIN BOVIN (OH DIVINE BOVINE)
Director:
Alexandre RufinCanada | 2013 | Documentary | 6 minutes

Meat Hooked

GET TICKETS
“Why is a nice Jewish girl like me making a film about pigs and bacon?” Suzanne Wasserman, the writer and director of Meat Hooked, asks in the beginning of her film. In her absorbing and graphic documentary Wasserman introduces us to butchers and meatpackers, chefs and farmers who are part of the current meat craze of artisan butchers and meat CSA’s and includes interviews with Jonathan Sayles and Julie Powell (Julie & Julia). The film follows the rise and fall and rise again of butchers and butchering featuring several butchers, 3 of whom are Jewish but not kosher butchers. With humor and some fascinating insights Meat Hooked concludes that urban butchers, butcher shops and butchering fills an acute yearning for a sense of space and allows the consumer to have more of a sense of control over what we eat.

Awards

Best Feature: NY Food Film Festival

Ô Divin Bovin (Oh Divine Bovine) @ Film House
Oct 19 @ 5:00 pm

Director: Alexandre Rufin
Canada/Quebec | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 6 minutes
Short: Playing with Meat Hooked! .

O-divin-bovin

Just an ordinary day in the life of a farmer: birth/death of a calf.

Short Term 12 @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 19 @ 5:15 pm

Director: Destin Daniel Cretton
USA | 2012 | Fiction
Run Time: 96 minutes
Film source: Cinedigm
Sponsor: Lorna-Kay Peal & Michael Smolin

Short Term 12

GET TICKETS
Winner of both the Grand Jury Narrative Feature and the Narrative Audience Award at this year’s SXSW Film Festival, Short Term 12 is moving, honest, and emotionally revelatory. Focusing on the residents and caretakers at a residential foster care center for at-risk teenagers, Short Term 12 explores the difficult and extremely human realities of what it means to take care of another person. The story is told largely through the eyes of Grace (rising star Brie Larson, who won Best Actress at the Locarno Film Festival for her performance), the facility’s supervisor, as she tries to find ways to deal with her own life as well as those of the residents. Grace is put to the test with the arrival of Jayden, a troubled new arrival with whom she finds a special connection. Shot in an unobtrusive, handheld style, Short Term 12 is raw, sincere, and, at times, unexpectedly funny, with terrific performances at every level.

Awards

Grand Jury Award SXSW, Best Actress Locarno Film Festival

In The Wrong Body @ Arts Riot
Oct 19 @ 6:00 pm

Director: Marilyn Solaya
2010 | Cuba | Documentary | Spanish w/English subtitles
Running Time: 55 mins
Ticketing Note: at the door, on the night. Printed guide says film is playing Fri 10/18. This is incorrect. It is playing Sat, 10/19.
Sponsor: Americas Media Initiative
Q&A with filmmaker
Note: In the printed festival guide the screening is listed for Friday. Oct 18. This is incorrect. The film plays Saturday, oct 19.

IN THE WRONG BODY

The story of Mavi Susel, who underwent the first gender reassignment operation in Cuba in 1988. In the Wrong Body explores such timely issues as the meaning of femininity in the macho and patriarchal society in Cuba where many stereotypes and prejudices still exist. Mariela Castro, Director of the Cuban National Center for Sex Education (CENESEX) was a primary consultant on the film.

In the Wrong Body @ Arts Riot
Oct 19 @ 6:00 pm
Director: Marilyn Solaya
Cuba | 2010 | Documentary | Spanish w/English subtitles
Run Time: 55 minutes
Ticketing Note: This screening is affiliated with VTIFF. Tickets may be purchased at the door only.

IN THE WRONG BODY

The story of Mavi Susel, who underwent the first gender reassignment operation in Cuba in 1988. In the Wrong Body explores such timely issues as the meaning of femininity in the macho and patriarchal society in Cuba where many stereotypes and prejudices still exist. Mariela Castro, Director of the Cuban National Center for Sex Education (CENESEX) was a primary consultant on the film.

Special Note:

Q&A with director

Brothers Hypnotic @ Film House
Oct 19 @ 7:00 pm

Director: Reuben Atlas
USA, Netherlands | 2013 | Documentary | English
Run Time: 85 minutes
Film source: Reuben Atlas
Sponsor: Duncan Wisniewski Architecture 

Brothers Hypnotic

GET TICKETS
Note: Tickets include the live performance at 10PM at Signal Kitchen. One ticket gets you in to both.
The eight brothers in the Hypnotic Brass Ensemble are all sons of anti-establishment jazz legend, Phil Cohran. Raised together on Chicago’s South Side on a diet of jazz, funk and Black Consciousness, the brothers play inthe streets of NYC, collaborate with Mos Def or wow people at jazz festivals. The film constructs their coming of age story with wonderful camera work and hugely enjoyable music scenes.

GALA SCREENING

Screening followed by Gala party at Signal Kitchen (8:45PM) and live performance by the Hypnotic Ensemble. More info… sponsored by Signal Kitchen, John Douglas & Bob Summers. Ticket to film includes free access to the party an  live concert.

In the House @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 19 @ 7:30 pm

Director: François Ozon
France | 2013 | Fiction | French w/English subtitles
Run Time: 105 minutes
Film source: Cohen Media Group 

In The House

GET TICKETS
Perhaps the most important and daring modern French filmmaker, François Ozon has created, in In the House, another in a series of provocative explorations of sexuality and desire. Claude (Umhauer, in a cryptic performance), a gifted student, impresses his teacher (Luchini) with uncommonly perceptive essays, thus beginning a surprising series of manipulations that reverberate throughout the lives of reader and writer alike. As Claude’s stories – all of which involve his classmate, Rapha, and his “perfect family” – get darker and stranger, it becomes increasingly difficult to separate fact from fiction, and Ozon revels in this uncertainty, daring us to do the same. Winner of multiple international awards, this is a deceptively simple film that, once unraveled, becomes more and more challenging; in the end, it does nothing less than call into question the very nature of storytelling itself. The film’s jaw-dropping last shot is at once a summary, a question mark, and a challenge to anyone who thinks they understand the way stories “should” be told.

Gala Party (Closing Night) @ Signal Kitchen
Oct 19 @ 8:30 pm – 9:30 pm

GALA PARTY

Celebrating the screening of Reuben Atlas’s Brother’s Hypnotic, and the live show of the band.
Ticketing Note: This is a double bill with the film: Brother Hypnotic. Tickets get you into both film and show.
The Hypnotic Ensemble will play at the party after The Audience Favorites are announced. Food provided, cash bar.

Brothers Hypnotic

This event was made possible thanks to John Douglas and Bob Summers and to the amazing Signal Kitchen.

Special Ticketing Note: Only ticket holders to Brothers Hypnotic  may attend the party and the show.

Oct
20
Sun
Make Hummus Not War @ ECHO
Oct 20 @ 11:00 am
Director: Trevor Graham
Australia | 2012 | Documentary
Run Time: 77 minutes
Film source: Yarrabank Films
Sponsor Burlington-Bethlehem-Arad Sister City Program

Make Hummus Not War Director Trevor Graham

GET TICKETS
Can a regional love of hummus be a recipe for peace in the Middle East? One of the oldest-known prepared foods in human history, hummus is claimed by multiple Middle-Eastern nationalities. So when Trevor Graham, a self-described hummus tragic, learned of a Lebanese plan to sue Israel for acting as if it had proprietary rights over the dish, he was intrigued and hungry for more. With Israel, Lebanon and Palestine fighting over who “owns” the hummus heritage, Graham set off on a personal, culinary and humorous journey through the hummus bars and kitchens of Beirut, Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and New York. Along the way he encounters doyenne of Middle East cuisine, Claudia Roden, zealots, Jewish settlers, political activists, chick pea farmers, novelists and sheikhs.

Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase 6 @ Film House
Oct 20 @ 12:00 pm

FREE SCREENING
Screening free, recommended donation of $5+

MFANGANO
Director: Derek McIntire
Documentary | 25 minutes
Sponsors: The Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase is sponsored by Ben & Jerry’s and by The Vermont Arts Council  

Mfangano

Focusing on a community center established to address public health issues, Mfangano is a documentary that explores life on a small island off the Kenyan shores of Lake Victoria.

The Genius of Marian @ ECHO
Oct 20 @ 1:00 pm
Director: Banker White, Anna Fitch
USA | 2013 | Documentary
Run Time: 84 minutes
Film source: Filmmaker
Sponsor: Nora and Nancy Bercaw in honor of Beau Bercaw 

Playing with: There’s No Hole in My Head
Director:
 Alison Segar | USA | 2011 | Documentary | 15 minutes

Genius of Marian

GET TICKETS

A visually rich, emotionally complex story that follows Pam White in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease as her son, the filmmaker, documents her struggles to retain her sense of self. After she is diagnosed at age 61 life begins to change for Pam and everyone around her. Pam’s husband grapples with his changing role from partner to caregiver. Her adult children each find ways to show their love and support while mourning the slow loss of their mother. And Pam deals with the fear that she will be institutionalized for her disease. This delicate film treats the subject with a humor and a light touch while serving as a meditation on the role of memory in creating legacy.

 

Director’s Statment

I have been making documentary films for more than a decade and each project has been deeply important to me in its own way.  My most recent film, THE GENIUS OF MARIAN, is the most personal and most challenging project I have ever undertaken. I approached this film both as a loving son and as a patient observer.  It is a story about my extraordinary mother, Pam White, and her struggle with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. On the surface, the film is about my family’s efforts to come to terms with the changes Alzheimer’s disease brings. But it is also a meditation on the meaning of family, the power of art and the beautiful and painful ways we cope with illness and loss. The last few years have been a roller coaster of emotions, filled with frustration, sadness, joy and celebration. I didn’t originally set out to make a documentary film about my mother’s disease. The project began as a series of informal recorded conversations with my mom in the months after her Alzheimer’s diagnosis in 2009. She had begun writing a memoir called “The Genius of Marian” about her own mother (my grandmother), Marian Williams Steele. Marian was a well-loved and well-known painter and was in many ways the matriarch of our family. In 2001, Marian died of Alzheimer’s disease at the age of 89.

Soon after my mom started writing the book, she began to struggle with typing and other mental tasks. To help her continue the project, I began filming our conversations. For the next three years, I recorded both the big events and the small details of my family’s changing reality. I filmed my parents recounting stories of how they met and fell in love. I captured my mother’s delight at the birth of her grandchildren. But I also documented the slow erosion of my mother’s ability to dress and feed herself, her waning independence, and her fierce resistance to accepting help from professional caregivers.

I grew up feeling like my mom could do it all—and often, she did. She worked full-time while raising my siblings and me, maintained deep friendships and dedicated herself to helping others, both in her personal life and in her career as a therapist. She loved being a mom and encouraged us to be ourselves, always stressing how important it was to talk about our feelings, especially when times were tough. That’s why it was especially painful to see her frozen by the shame of her diagnosis, unable to talk openly about what she was experiencing. And despite being a loving, willing and available family, we also struggled to share our thoughts and feelings with each other. Before she was ready to talk candidly about her diagnosis, my mom and I were able to connect by remembering Marian, someone we’d both loved and had lost to the disease that was now affecting my mother. These intimate conversations became a kind of therapy space and my mom began to share the complex emotions related to what she was going through. At the same time, filming with the other members of my family provided a way for each of us to celebrate my mother’s life while processing difficult feelings about how she was changing. I am grateful to my siblings and father for having the bravery to share so openly. I have been especially moved by my father, who displayed tremendous compassion and loyalty while grappling with his changing role from partner to caregiver. The spirit of my mother’s book project was my point of departure — the deep desire to memorialize someone you love and to connect with the difficult and complex emotions that surround losing them. My goal is to create a film that finds light and beauty in a place often shrouded in shame and confusion. A patient approach to production has helped me capture the essence of my family’s story. I’ve shared warmth and intimacy in conversations with my mother, laid bare our family’s challenges in caring for her and allowed myself to feel the silence that increasingly fills my parents’ house. I believe the story is deeply important and powerfully told and I trust it will resonate not only for those directly affected by Alzheimer’s disease, but for with anyone who has had to reconcile complicated emotions around aging and loss. It is from this place that I know we have created something special.

~ Banker White, Director

There’s No Hole In My Head @ ECHO
Oct 20 @ 1:00 pm
Director: Alison Segar
USA | 2011 | Documentary
Run Time: 15 minutes
Sponsor: Jessica Nordhaus & Michael Sheeser
Playing with: Genius of Marian

No-Hole-In-My-Head

In 2007, aged 54, Abby Hale was diagnosed with early onset of Alzheimer’s. As a mom and medical practitioner Abby eloquently shares with grace and insight what she has both gained and lost as a result.

Vermont Filmmkakers’ Showcase 7 @ Film House
Oct 20 @ 1:00 pm

FREE SCREENING
Screening free, recommended donation of $5+

STILL MOVING: PILOBOLUS AT FORTY
Director: Jeffrey Ruoff
Documentary | 38 minutes
Sponsors: The Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase is sponsored by Ben & Jerry’s and the Vermont Arts Council

Still Moving

In the 1970′s, the Dartmouth-born collective Pilobolus innovated a collaborative, improvisational style and organization that transformed modern dance. On the eve of its fortieth anniversary, Pilobolus thrives as an arts organism.

Hannah Arendt @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 20 @ 1:30 pm

Director: Margarethe von Trotte
Germany | 2013 | Fiction | English and German w/English subtitles
Run Time: 113 minutes
Film source: Zeitgeist Films
Sponsor: Institute for Civic Engagement

Hannah Arendt

GET TICKETS
A complex and compelling biopic of one of the most original thinkers of the 20th Century, Hannah Arendt delves deeply into the philosophical and personal life of its title character. The film marks the sixth cinematic collaboration between director Margarethe von Trotta, one of the leading figures of the New German Cinema, and star Barbara Sukowa, one of that movements most important performers. Sukowa’s nuanced performance reveals the deeply personal emotions that underpin – sometimes complicatedly – Arendt’s groundbreaking philosophy. Hannah Arendt shuttles back and forth between Arendt’s middle age, when she developed and refined her theory of evil, and her youth, when she studied with Martin Heidegger, whose subsequent affiliation with the Nazi Party caused her to call her own work into question. In its early scenes of Arendt covering the trial of Adolf Eichmann for The New Yorker, Von Trotta boldly blends actuality footage of the courtroom proceedings with her film’s “regular” fiction scenes, thereby encouraging the viewer to consider, as Arendt herself did, the links between past and present.

Director’s statement: This is a film that shows Arendt as a person caught between her thoughts and her emotions—one who often has to disentangle her intellect from her feelings. We see her as a passionate thinker and professor; as a woman capable of lifelong friendship—she was hailed as a woman who was a “genius at friendship”—but also as a fighter who courageously defended her ideas and never shied away from any confrontation. But her goal was always to understand. Her signature declaration, “I want to understand,” is the phrase that best describes her.

Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase 8 @ Film House
Oct 20 @ 2:15 pm

FREE SCREENING
Screenings free, recommended donation of $5+
Sponsors: The Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase is sponsored by Ben & Jerry’s and the Vermont Arts Council

EDSEL THE BLIND MECHANIC
Director: Andrea Grayson
Documentary | 6 minutes

edsel under car still 2

Within six months of noticing a dark spot in one of his eyes, master mechanic Edsel Hammond was declared legally blind. But with the support of family and friends, he has a thriving car repair business at his garage in Charlotte, Vermont.

TOBY MACNUTT: BODY OF WORK
Directors: Ashley DeLucco & Elizabeth Rossano
Documentary | 7 minutes

Toby MacNutt Body of Work

A short subject documentary featuring the Vermont based fiber artist and dancer Toby MacNutt.

 

DON’T MAKE LOVE TO IT, ANDREW
Director: Andrew Ackerman
Documentary
Run Time: 25 minutes

DMLTIAposter

Mixed Martial Arts is commonly thought to be one of the violent and brutal sports on the planet. I spent three months exploring the culture surrounding this sport and training for an amateur fight. This is a self documentary of that exploration.

Frances Ha @ Black Box Theatre
Oct 20 @ 4:00 pm

Director: Noah Baumbach
USA | 2013 | Fiction
Run Time: 86 minutes
Film source: IFC Films

Frances Ha

GET TICKETS
Buoyed up by a charming, winning performance by Greta Gerwig (who co-wrote the script), Frances Ha unfolds as a witty, enjoyable series of snapshots of the life of the title character, a young woman adrift in Manhattan. Though she’s funny, charming, and great fun to get drunk with, Frances can’t quite get her act together. But, unlike director Noah Baumbach’s previous, rather more serious films, The Squid and the Whale and Greenberg (also starring Gerwig), Frances Ha takes a lighter, even comical look at young, urban driftlessness, without ever glorifying it. Shot in black and white and set chiefly in New York City, Frances Ha’s tip of the hat to Woody Allen’s Manhattan suggests that the film is as much about that dynamic city as it is about its loose-knit story. More prominent an influence is that of the French New Wave, which crops up in the film’s use of music by Georges Delerue, the charming purposelessness of the main characters, the cinematography, and even offhand references to Jean-Pierre Léaud and François Truffaut’s Small Change. Baumbach’s film boldly asks viewers to consider it within the contexts of film history, yet remains a charming, modern-day, urban fable, with which we can all identify.

Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase 9 @ Film House
Oct 20 @ 4:00 pm

FREE SCREENING
Screening free, recommended donation of $5+

WISCONSIN RISING
Director: Sam Mayfield
2013 | Documentary | 56 minutes
Director’s Cut
Sponsors: The Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase is sponsored by Ben & Jerry’s and the Vermont Arts Council

Wisconsin-Rising

Wisconsin Rising tells the story of the largest sustained workers resistance in American history. In 2011, Wisconsin was the canary in the coal mine for America as newly-elected Republican Governor Scott Walker suddenly stripped collective bargaining rights from the state’s public employees, undoing eight decades of basic workers’ rights. The people rose up. The future of America hung in the balance.

Sleepless in Burlington @ Film House
Oct 20 @ 7:00 pm

The closing celebration of the festival, handed over to the 5 area colleges – UVM, St Michael’s, Burlington College, Champlain College and Middlebury – who each have 24 hours to make a film.

The results, presented in an American Idol style showcase, puts on display the creativity, imagination, and technical skills of these, our next generation of filmmakers. The evening concludes with the awarding of prizes.

After the screening of the competing films, and while the jury is privately discussing the winners, we will be serving food and drinks in the lobby area outside Film House.

The evening concludes with the announcement and presentation of 4 Awards: Best Film, Best Actor, Best Actress and Audience Choice.

HIGHLIGHT REEL from 2012′s SLEPPLESS IN BURLINGTON

Nov
1
Fri
VTIFF Showcase at Brattleboro Film Festival @ Latchis Theater
Nov 1 – Nov 14 all-day

A showcase of select films from VTIFF 2013

Brattelboro-FFThe showcase will be featured at the 2013 Brattleboro Film Festival, which runs from November 1 to 14. We are delighted to be partnering with kindred spirits in the opposite corner of the state. Sharing information and resources makes sense in a state as sparsely populated as Vermont. We look forward to developing this mutually beneficial relationship and future collaborations.

Nov
12
Tue
Eames: The Architect and the Painter @ BCA
Nov 12 @ 7:00 pm – 9:30 pm

A VTIFF-affiliated monthly series of films and discussions about architecture and design

Directed by Jason Cohen & Bill Jersey | USA | 2011 | documentary | 82 minutes

The husband-and-wife team of Charles and Ray Eames are widely regarded as America’s most important designers. Perhaps best remembered for their mid-century plywood and fiberglass furniture, the Eames Office also created a mind bending variety of other products, from splints for wounded military during World War II, to photography, interiors, multi-media exhibits, graphics, games, films and toys. But their personal lives and influence on significant events in American life – from the development of modernism, to the rise of the computer age – has been less widely understood. Narrated by James Franco, Eames: The Architect and the Painter is the first film since their death dedicated to these creative geniuses and their work

Watch trailer

Dec
3
Tue
Unfinished Spaces @ BCA
Dec 3 @ 7:00 pm – 9:30 pm

A VTIFF-affiliated monthly series of films and discussions about architecture and design

Directed by Alysa Nahmias | USA | 2011 | documentary | 86 minutes

In 1961, three young, visionary architects were commissioned by Fidel Castro and Che Guevara to create Cuba’s National Art Schools on the grounds of a former golf course in Havana, Cuba. Dancers, musicians and artists from all over the country reveled in the beauty of the schools, but as the dream of the Revolution quickly became a reality, construction was abruptly halted and the architects and their designs were deemed irrelevant in the prevailing political climate. Forty years later the schools are in use, but remain unfinished and decaying. Castro has invited the exiled architects back to finish their unrealized dream

Dec
31
Tue
First Night Burlington-Family-friendly Shorts @ BCA
Dec 31 @ 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm
First Night Burlington-Family-friendly Shorts @ BCA | Burlington | Vermont | United States

A program of award-winning family friendly short films curated especially for First Night Burlington.

New Year’s Eve – The Hypnotic Brass Ensemble @ Arts Riot
Dec 31 @ 8:00 pm – Dec 31 @ 12:00 am
New Year's Eve - The Hypnotic Brass Ensemble @ Arts Riot | Burlington | Vermont | United States

Signal Kitchen and ArtsRiot present, in association with VTIFF, Zero Gravity Craft Brewery and Farrell Distribution, New Years Eve ’14 with Hypnotic Brass Ensemble!: 2 sets by the Ensemble, open bar & catered food. Hurry up to get your discounted tickets at the amazing price of $60 before these run out – we have only a limited supply of tickets at this price.
GET TICKETS

The Hypnotic show sold out during the Vermont International Film Festival 2013. They are an eight-piece brass ensemble out o the South Side of Chicago, consisting of eight sons of the jazz trumpeter Phil Cohran. With only horns and a drum set, “Hypnotic” has traveled the world. Their musical style ranges from hip-hop to jazz to funk and rock, including calypso and gypsy music. They call their eclectic blend of sound “now music”, or “Hypnotic”. Reared in the teachings of music since they were children, they grew up on the stage playing as the “Phil Cohran Youth Ensemble”

Jan
21
Tue
Rivers & Tides @ BCA
Jan 21 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm

A VTIFF-affiliated monthly series of films and discussions about architecture and design

Directed by Thomas Riedelsheimer | USA | 2002 | documentary | 90 minutes

Depicting the magical relationship between art and nature while painting a visually intoxicating portrait of artist Andy Goldsworthy, RIVERS AND TIDES follows the bohemian free spirit all over the world as he demonstrates and discusses his creative process and artistic philosophies. From his long-winding rock walls and icicle sculptures to his interlocking leaf chains and multicolored pools of flowers, Goldsworthy’s painstakingly intricate masterpieces are made entirely of materials found in Mother Nature – an unpredictable “critic” who threatens and often succeeds in destroying his art, sometimes before it is even finished. RIVERS AND TIDES is a mesmerizing cinematic experience that helps us to appreciate design and nature in new and enchanting ways

Jan
23
Thu
Is The Man Who Is Tall Happy? @ The Film House, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center
Jan 23 @ 7:00 pm

An Animated Conversation With Noam Chomsky
Directed by Michel Gondry | USA | 2013 | documentary | 88 minutes
tallman-chomsky
From Michel Gondry, the innovative director of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and The Science of Sleep, comes this unique animated documentary on the life of controversial MIT professor, philosopher, linguist, anti-war activist and political firebrand Noam Chomsky. [...]
Post screening discussion, led by Emily Manetta, Associate Professor of Anthropology in the program of Linguistics at The University of Vermont

Watch the trailer

Jan
26
Sun
Inequality For All: A Passionate Argument On Behalf Of The Middle Class @ Palace 9
Jan 26 @ 10:00 am

Inequality-for-All

This free film will be followed by a town meeting to discuss the issue of income inequality, what it means for the future of our society, and what we can do to make a difference. Sen. Sanders will lead a panel discussion with audience participation.
Free bagels and coffee at 10 a.m.
Film begins at 10:30 a.m.

Feb
11
Tue
If You Build It @ BCA
Feb 11 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm

A VTIFF-affiliated monthly series of films and discussions about architecture and design

Directed by Patrick Creadon | USA | 2013 | documentary | 82 minutes

If You Build It spends a year in the life of one of America’s most innovative classrooms. Starring Emily Pilloton and Matt Miller, founders of Project H Design, which is dedicated to design initiatives for Humanity, Habitats, Health, and Happiness. The film chronicles 13 high school juniors in Bertie County, NC throughout the school year where Emily and Matt will be teaching the fundamentals of design, architecture, and construction. Together with “design-build” fundamentals, the students will be learning the principles of “design thinking” – a very specific way of looking at problems to determine how best to solve them: Research, Ideate, Develop, Prototype, Refine, and Build. Their goal is that the students will leave Studio H equipped to tackle virtually any problem they will face throughout their lives
Watch the trailer

Feb
13
Thu
Idle Threat @ Perry Hall Presentation Room, Champlain College
Feb 13 @ 7:00 pm

Since 1971, the City of New York has had laws restricting curbside engine idling. One man, determined to reduce air pollution in his neighborhood and combat global climate change, confronted the city’s lax enforcement efforts. This film chronicles the challenges and triumphs of his campaign
IdleThreat

Following the one hour screening, there will be a Q&A session with the filmmaker, George Pakenham, as well as representatives from Idle-Free Vermont and the City of Burlington to discuss current, local anti-idling efforts. Sponsored by the Divisions of Communication and Creative Media, Education & Human Studies, and Core and Sustain Champlain.

 

Feb
20
Thu
The Punk Singer @ Main Street Landing Film House
Feb 20 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

The Punk Singer
Directed by Sini Anderson | 80 Min | U.S.A. | 2013

PS_POSTER-202x300

Introduction and post-screening discussion led by Stella Marrs, interdisciplinary artist and Champlain College professor.
About the film: Kathleen Hanna, lead singer of the punk band Bikini Kill and dance-punk trio Le Tigre, rose to national attention as the reluctant but never shy voice of the riot grrrl movement…read more

Watch trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwrXC5OXqgc

Feb
21
Fri
Strength of the Storm @ Main Street Landing Film House
Feb 21 @ 6:00 pm

“Strength of the Storm” directed by Rob Koier tells the moving story of the residents of Weston park, a mobile home park in rural Vermont, that are brought together to fight against issues of economic discrimination after losing their homes to Hurricane Irene. The film weaves together footage of the flood with interviews with members of Weston park. We follow their recovery process from one week after the flood to six months later.

Watch the trailer

Feb
28
Fri
Experimental Films Inspire TR Ericsson @ BCA, 2nd floor
Feb 28 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm

About TR Ericsson

Chris Marker’s La Jetee
lajetee

1962, black & white, unrated, 28 minutes, France
Chris Marker, filmmaker, poet, novelist, photographer, editor, and now videographer and digital multimedia artist, has been challenging moviegoers, philosophers, and himself for years with his complex queries about time, memory, and the rapid advancement of life on this planet. Marker’s La Jetée is one of the most influential, radical science-fiction films ever made, a tale of time travel told in still images.

Hollis Frampton’s Nostalgia
1971, black & white, unrated, 36 minutes, USA
To speak of Frampton’s films as merely structural riddles or philosophical proposals, fails to take into account their pleasurable and poetic nature. The gamelike qualities of his films prove playful rather than didactic and always retain a residue of enigma. Read on…

Bruce Baillie’s Mass for the Dakota Sioux
1964, black & white. unrated, 24 minutes, USA
A film Mass, dedicated to nobility and excellence. Read on…

Mar
12
Wed
The House I Live In @ Vermont Commons School
Mar 12 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Directed by Eugene Jarecki | USA | 2013 |
Grand Jury Prize Sundance 2013
As America remains embroiled in conflict overseas, a less visible war is taking place at home, costing countless lives, destroying families, and inflicting untold damage on future generations of Americans. Over forty years, the War on Drugs has accounted for more than 45 million arrests, made America the world’s largest jailer, and damaged poor communities at home and abroad. Read more…

Watch trailer

While recognizing the seriousness of drug abuse as a matter of public health, the film investigates the tragic errors and shortcomings that have meant it is more often treated as a matter for law enforcement, creating a vast machine that feeds largely on America’s poor, and especially on minority communities. Beyond simple misguided policy, The House I Live In examines how political and economic corruption have fueled the war for forty years, despite persistent evidence of its moral, economic, and practical failures.

Mar
18
Tue
How Much Does Your Building Weigh, Mr. Foster? @ The BCA Center
Mar 18 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm

53617

A VTIFF-affiliated monthly series of films and discussions about architecture and design

Directed by Carlos Carcas & Noberto Lopez Amado | Spain | 2010 | documentary | 78 minutes

The film traces the rise of one of the world’s premier architects, Norman Foster and his unending quest to improve the quality of life through design. Portrayed are Foster’s origins and how his dreams and influences inspired the design of emblematic projects such as the largest building in the world Beijing Airport, the Reichstag, the Hearst Building in New York and works such as the tallest bridge ever in Millau France. In the very near future, the majority of mankind will abandon the countryside and live entirely in cities. Foster offers some striking solutions to the problems that this historic event will create
Watch the trailer

Mar
20
Thu
Irish Film Festival @ Somerville Theatre
Mar 20 – Mar 24 all-day

IFF_Primary_Logo_low res

 

http://www.irishfilmfestival.com/about/

Fast, Cheap & Out of Control @ UVM's Billings Lecture Hall
Mar 20 @ 6:45 pm – 7:45 pm

Directed by Errol Morris | 1997 | USA |82 minutes
Pre-film discussion at 6.00pm.Part of the UVM Lane Film Series.

fastcheap_poster

What do an elderly topiary gardener, a retired lion tamer, a man fascinated by mole rats, and a cutting-edge robotics designer have in common? Both nothing and everything in this unconventional documentary directed by Erroll Morris. Fast, Cheap & Out of Control (Referring to the robot specialist’s strange philosophy of robot design structure, not Erroll Morris’s documentary techniques!) interplays, overlaps, and interrelates these four separate and highly specialized documentary subjects in order to in truth study all of humanity, raising questions about the future of mankind. Written by Matthew F. Griffin.

Main Street Landing Presents: The Broken Circle Breakdown @ Main Street Landing Film House
Mar 20 @ 7:00 pm

bsb-poster-web

Main Street Landing Presents
The Broken Circle Breakdown
Directed by Felix Van Groeningen
Screenplay By Carl Joos & Felix Van Groeningen | With Johan Heldenbergh And Veerle Baetens
2012 | 112 Minutes | Dutch w/English subtitles

2013 Oscar Nominee – Best Foreign Film
Awards:
Panorama Audience Award at the 2013 Berlin International Film Festival, Europa Cinemas Label as Best European Film in the Panorama section in the Berlin
International Film Festival, Best Screenplay for a narrative feature -2013 Tribeca Film Festival, Best Actress in a narrative feature (Veerle Baetens)
– 2013 Tribeca Film Festival 9 Ensor Awards of Flemish Cinema including for Best Film,
Best Director, Best Actress, and Best Music.

About the film:

Elise (Veerle Baetens) and Didier (Johan Heldenbergh) fall in love at first sight. She has her own tattoo shop and he plays the banjo in a bluegrass band.
They bond over their shared enthusiasm for American music and culture, and dive headfirst into a sweeping romance that plays out on and off stage —
but when an unexpected tragedy hits their new family, everything they know and love is tested. An intensely moving portrait of a relationship from
beginning to end, propelled by a soundtrack of foot-stomping bluegrass, The Broken Circle Breakdown is a romantic melodrama of the highest order.

The New Black @ Merrill's Roxy Cinemas
Mar 20 @ 7:00 pm – 8:50 pm

the-new-black-poster

The New Black is a documentary that tells the story of how the African-American community is grappling with the gay rights issue in light of the recent gay marriage movement and the fight over civil rights. The film documents activists, families and clergy on both sides of the campaign to legalize gay marriage and examines homophobia in the black community’s institutional pillar—the black church and reveals the Christian right wing’s strategy of exploiting this phenomenon in order to pursue an anti-gay political agenda. The New Black takes viewers into the pews and onto the streets and provides a seat at the kitchen table as it tells the story of the historic fight to win marriage equality in Maryland and charts the evolution of this divisive issue within the black community.

Watch the trailer

An opportunity to see the award winning film The New Black, followed by a panel discussion.​ Issues of race, and the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community are rarely discussed in our area.​ This film will give us an opportunity to do that, learn from each other and move forward as a community.

Mar
21
Fri
Green Mountain Film Festival @ Montpelier, Vermont
Mar 21 – Mar 30 all-day

gmff

 

Welcome to the seventeenth annual Green Mountain Film Festival. Here we are again; Mud season and the arrival of some the finest films from around the world and as our new byline declares… The World Comes To You! As always, our lineup includes a broad range of feature, documentary, short and animated films as well as engaging conversations with distinguished guests, and we are excited this year to continue what we started last year with several sneak previews of high profile films that will show only once (get your tickets early!).

Among those, of note, is a premium program with Bela Fleck, the internationally renowned banjo artist. Bela was commissioned last year to write a banjo concerto for the Nashville Symphony and a film was made chronicling the process. Bela will be here in person to talk about the film and to play a passage from the concerto. We have added the Montpelier High School auditorium to our venues this year to accommodate what will surely be a sell-out event. Additionally, Luis Guzman, the acclaimed actor and fellow Vermont resident will take part in an excerpt retrospective of many of his great films with a following Q&A. And Burlington’s own Spielpalast Cabaret is paired with the classic film Pandora’s Box.

We had a lot of great feedback on last year’s festival and we have adapted to suggestions and adopted changes to make your festival experience easier and more enjoyable. Our ticketing system continues to improve and you can purchase tickets: online from our easy-to-navigate festival website (www.gmffestival.org) starting March 3rd, by phone (802-262-3423) beginning March 8th and in person beginning March 10th at our new ticket office at 13 Main St., Montpelier (old Verizon storefront, courtesy of the Jacobs family).

The Green Mountain Film Festival is presented byFocus on Film a 30 year-old Central Vermont organization whose purpose is :-

  • to provide public film showings of cultural, social and historic interest;
  • to sponsor discussions of such films;
  • and to provide an opportunity for independent filmmakers to exhibit their works.
Mar
25
Tue
Feminist Video Shorts @ The BCA Center
Mar 25 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

feminist-360

Curated by Stella Marrs & DJ Hellerman

Join us for a special presentation of feminist inspired video shorts in celebration of Women’s History Month. Co-curated by Stella Marrs and DJ Hellerman, the shorts program provides an opportunity to examine ideas of gender, race, and class through an interrogation of pop culture, celebrity, domesticity, and sexual orientation.

Stella Marrs is an interdisciplinary artist whose work addresses feminism, ecology, and the female voice. Marrs has made large scale, collaborative, event-based works such as Girl City and 100 Women Dinner Party that are cited as seeds for later Riot Grrrl culture. She was commissioned to create a video installation for the 2013 BCA Center exhibition Seat’s Taken. DJ Hellerman is Curator and Director of Exhibitions at Burlington City Arts.

http://www.stellamarrs.com/about/